Blu-ray/DVD Reviews


Currently showing posts tagged 1972

  • Where the Buffalo Roam (1980) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    Where the Buffalo Roam (1980)

    Director: Art Linson

    Starring: Peter Boyle & Bill Murray

    Released by: Shout Select

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Culled from the wild and crazy exploits of gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson, Where the Buffalo Roam centers on the eccentric reporter (Bill Murray, Caddyshack) and his ex-attorney Carlo Lazlo, Esq. (Peter Boyle, Young Frankenstein), fueled on drugs and a madness for adventure, as they navigate the politically spiraling and violent days of the late sixties and seventies.

    The first film taken from Thompson’s toxic brand of chaotic intellect, Where the Buffalo Roam takes liberties with the facts concerning the journalist’s construction of a story based on the misadventures of friend and ex-attorney Carlo Lazlo, Esq.  Rewinding to the years 1968-1972 where Lazlo attempts to free an avalanche of San Francisco youths from overly severe drug charges, Thompson drinks and drugs his way through the proceedings while his latest deadline looms.  Rambling his way from one city to the next and leaving a trail of destruction in his wake, Thompson’s coverage of Super Bowl VI is sidetracked by the equally eccentric Lazlo’s presence who convinces the writer to join him on a mission to supply freedom fighters with heavy artillery.  Bailing on the plane escaping madness once the fuzz show and capturing the attention of young adults across the college campus circuit, Thompson offers sage advice by supporting the notion of illegal substances in the writing process and confronting then Presidential candidate Richard Nixon during an awkward bathroom encounter.  While the chemistry between Murray and Boyle sells and their performances, most notably Murray who does a sound impression of Thompson that was, for better and sometimes worse according to his fellow cast members, carried over to his next season of Saturday Night Live, Where the Buffalo Roam is structurally messy and never as funny or witty as it thinks it is.  Scored by Neil Young in one of his only film efforts, a lackluster screenplay and dismal box-office returns, trifled by Thompson’s own disdain for the finished effort, leaves Where the Buffalo Roam as merely the forgotten predecessor to Terry Gilliam’s much trippier and appreciated Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas adaptation.

    Shout Select welcomes Where the Buffalo Roam to high-definition with a 1080p transfer, preserving its 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  A softer sight, colors are favorable but never do much popping while, skin tones remain nicely detailed and natural-looking.  Very scant notices of scuffs aside, a filmic quality is inherent throughout the feature without any over-sharpening techniques applied.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is serviceable with the mumbling manner of Thompson’s speech requiring an occasional increase in volume while, the film’s excellent music choices (presented for the first time ever on home video!) ranging from cuts by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, The Temptations, Neil Young and more, offer stronger boosts in range and bass.  

    Billed under Shout Select’s Collector’s Edition banner, special features, although limited, include, Inventing the Buffalo: A Look Back with John Kaye (41:58) where the screenwriter recalls being originally tasked with scripting Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, although caring little for its source citing a lackluster narrative structure, while its rights situation was resolved.  Bluntly put, Kaye also admits to being a former drug-addict and cites his research trip with Thompson through such cities as Aspen, Los Angeles and New Orleans as a fun drug binge.  In addition, Kaye felt Art Linson, making his directorial debut on the picture, was in over his head and maintains that his working relationship with Murray was a friendly one with the exception of one evening where the star badgered Kaye to come out and party resulting in Kaye having him removed from his hotel.  Lengthy and refreshingly honest, the interview is a must-watch for fans and detractors alike.  Furthermore, the Theatrical Trailer (3:14) and Reversible Cover Art conclude the supplemental package.

    Rarely funny but earning mild points for Murray’s spot-on interpretation of Thompson and Boyle’s equally worthy performance, Where the Buffalo Roam remains Hollywood’s dusty paperback attempt at bringing Thompson’s madcap brilliance to the big-screen with mostly unfavorable results.  Although its Collector’s Edition status, given its limited supply of extras, may be debated, the quality of Kaye’s interview and the film’s original music fully intact is warrant enough.  Murray completists will be pleased with what he brings to role of one of journalism’s most eccentric voices while, Thompson purists won’t help feeling underwhelmed.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Shout Select, Where the Buffalo Roam can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • Trouble Man (1972) Blu-ray Review

    Trouble Man (1972)

    Director: Ivan Dixon

    Starring: Robert Hooks, Paul Winfield, Ralph Waite, William Smithers, Paula Kelly & Julius Harris

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    When full-time hustler and licensed private eye Mr. T (Robert Hooks, N.Y.P.D.) is hired by two thugs to investigate their compromised gambling operation, Trouble Man finds the smooth talking enforcer engaged in a web of gang wars and murder in order to clear his slandered name.  Paul Winfield (The Terminator), Ralph Waite (The Waltons), William Smithers (Scorpio), Paula Kelly (Soylent Green) and Julius Harris (Super Fly) costar.

    A step above the average blaxploitation feature, Trouble Man highlights the bustling lifestyle of South Central’s own Mr. T whose expert pool skills, fashionable style and ladies man swagger compliment his no-nonsense street smarts and sharp business savvy as the ghetto’s personal problem solver.  Approached by local thugs Chalky (Winfield) and Pete (Waite) to uncover the masked thieves responsible for disrupting their gambling circuit, Mr. T finds himself entangled in a gang war when rival crime lord Big (Harris) is gunned down, laying the blame on the very capable hands of the inner city private detective.  Pursued by vengeful gangsters and local law enforcement, Mr. T unbuttons his expensive jacket and leads a one man army to bring his foolish framers down.  Charismatically charged, Robert Hooks headlines as the smooth soul brother whose martial arts expertise and whip-cracking demeanor ignites the film’s contagiously cool aura while, Motown legend Marvin Gaye’s choice musical accompaniments can’t be overstated.  Tightly edited by Michael Kahn before his career spanning collaborations with Director Steven Spielberg, Trouble Man is wickedly fun with memorable performances and action-packed gang warfare justifying itself as one bad motha worth investigating.

    With the exception of speckling observed during dimly lit sequences, Kino Lorber Studio Classics’ 1080p (1.85:1) transfer is overwhelmingly clean with no overt levels of damage while, the film’s inherent softness, as a product of its time, remains intact without compromising detail.  Meanwhile, flesh tones are eye-pleasing with more flamboyantly colorful attire and vibrant 70s decor popping nicely.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix that occasionally requires volume increases, dialogue is largely audible with few softer spoken exchanges registering not as strongly.  Thankfully, Marvin Gaye’s main title theme and other melodic queues are projected sharply with gunfire effects throughout the film’s final act making appropriate statements.  Relatively scant, special features include, an Audio Commentary with Film Historians Nathanial Thompson & Howard S. Berger with a Trailer Gallery featuring Trouble Man (2:30), Truck Turner (5:13), Across 110th Street (2:58), Cotton Comes to Harlem (2:11) and Report to the Commissioner (2:21) concluding the extras.

    Absurdly included amongst the fifty worst films of all time in Harry Medved and Randy Dreyfuss’ 1978 paperback, Trouble Man is far better and more entertaining than its reputation suggests.  Battling to clear his name while always ensuring time for beautiful girls, Robert Hooks leads the way with an entertaining turn loaded with attitude and leaving his enemies calling for mercy.  Boasting a soulful score from Marvin Gaye and a film appreciators audio commentary, Kino Lorber Studio Classics’ HD treatment of this underrated blaxploitation picture is as cool as the original Mr. T.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, Trouble Man can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Beware! The Blob (1972) Blu-ray Review

    Beware! The Blob (1972)

    Director: Larry Hagman

    Starring: Robert Walker, Gwynne Gilford, Richard Stahl, Richard Webb, Godfrey Cambridge, Carol Lynley, Larry Hagman & Shelley Berman

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Continuing the gooey mayhem, Beware! The Blob finds a community under attack when a geologist’s token from the North Pole thaws and unleashes an all-consuming feast on its terrified citizens.  Starring a plethora of familiar faces and cult figures including, Robert Walker (Easy Rider), Gwynne Gilford (Fade to Black), Sid Haig (Spider Baby), Shelley Berman (You Don’t Mess with the Zohan) among others, Jack H. Harris (The Blob, Dark Star) executive produces this followup.

    Oozing to theaters well over a decade after its classic predecessor, Beware! The Blob misfires in capturing the simple charms of its originator and instead opts to embrace the modern hippie culture of its era with droopy, tensionless results.  Returning home from his Arctic job assignment with a frozen keepsake in tow, Chester (Godfrey Cambridge, Watermelon Man) and his wife’s forgetfulness allows the mysterious capsule to thaw unleashing unexpected slimy mayhem.  Consumed while watchingThe Blob on television, Chester’s takeaway from the North Pole descends upon the local population, crossing paths with neighborhood gal Lisa (Gilford) and her boyfriend Bobby (Walker) who live to warn others only to have their cries fall on deaf ears.  Introducing spacey hippies, local law enforcement types and a troop of boy scouts to the festivities, directionless performances and meandering conversations between characters permeate the runtime until the Blob far too sporadically claims victims.  Unsurprisingly improvised with its screenplay greatly ignored, Beware! The Blob collects a diverse pool of talent including, but not limited to, an ape-suit wearing Gerrit Graham (Phantom of the Paradise), Burgess Meredith (Rocky) as a rambling wino, Cindy Williams (Laverne & Shirley) toking as a pot-smoking hippie and Dick Van Patten (Eight is Enough) as a dorky Scoutmaster, the lackluster sequel overwhelmingly stumbles with a bowling alley attack, akin to the original’s Colonial Theatre stampede but far less exciting, and an intendedly tense ice rink climax that arrives too little, too late.  Helmed by Larry Hagman in his only feature film credit, Beware! The Blob was re-released at the height of Dallas’ popularity, bearing the clever tagline, “The Film that J.R. Shot!” yet, failed to capture anything more than mild curiosity.  Lacking the fun of the original film and dawdling for much of its runtime with its titular monster a near afterthought, Beware! The Blob is a bubbling mess.

    Newly remastered, Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents Beware! The Blob with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Arriving with cases of speckling over its opening titles, the sci-fi sequel appears with a softer focus that can be attributed to its limited budget and on the fly making.  Skin tones are reasonably relayed while, colors in funky fashion choices and the Blob’s pinkish hues impress the most.  A welcome upgrade that still bears its battle wounds, the star-filled feature looks respectably decent.  Equipped with a rather disappointing DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, cracks and pops are not uncommon while, dialogue exchange is modest at best with muffled moments and poor sound mixing heavily apparent.  Special features include, an Audio Commentary with Film Historian Richard Harland Smith, an Alternate Title Sequence (2:42) bearing its Son of Blob moniker and Trailers for Beware! The Blob (1:45), The Incredible Two-Headed Transplant (2:14), Deranged (1:34) and Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? (2:14).

    A far cry from its iconic 1958 brethren, Beware! The Blob is a clumsy, unguided sequel that misses the mark on what should have been a simple, entertaining formula.  With no shortage of famous faces onscreen, the impaired direction and sheer lack of suspense or Blob-related appearances in the film shatters its chances, leaving it dazed in a cloud of its own bewilderment.  Presented with a new HD master, technical grades waver from sufficient to underwhelming with scant special features rounding out this bland schlockfest to beware.

    RATING: 2.5/5

    Available September 20th from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, Beware! The Blob can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Night of the Strangler (1972) DVD Review

    Night of the Strangler (1972)

    Director: Joy N. Houck, Jr.

    Starring: Chuck Patterson, Micky Dolenz, Michael Anthony & Jim Ralston

    Released by: Vinegar Syndrome

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set in the muggy region of Louisiana, Night of the Strangler centers on the scandalous relationship between a caucasian woman and her black lover.  Amidst family controversy and escalating racial tension, a string of mysterious murders follows in its path.  Chuck Patterson (Hair), Micky Dolenz (The Monkees), Michael Anthony (Keep Off My Grass!) and Jim Ralston (Thunder Run) star.

    Bearing an intriguing yet, wildly misleading title, Night of the Strangler crafts a whodunit murder mystery amongst the segregated south of New Orleans.  Returning home from college to inform her brothers of life changing news, Denise (Susan McCullough in her only film appearance) nervously admits to being impregnated by her African-American lover whom she plans to wed.  Bigoted big brother Dan (Ralston) doesn’t take kindly to the news of his baby sister shacking up with a colored man and intends to fix the situation.  Meanwhile, Denise’s middle brother Vance (Dolenz), equally unhappy with Dan following his own girlfriend being taken for himself, sympathizes with her.  With Denise madly in love and excited for her future, Dan’s wealth and power ensures their lives being cut short in order to not tarnish his own reputation.  Distraught over his sister’s alleged suicide, Vance seeks refuge in close family friend Father Jessie (Patterson), a black priest.  As tension builds between brothers, more murders conducted by a mysterious individual begin.  Lacking any kind of strangulation sequences, Night of the Strangler introduces viewers to hate spewing antagonist Dan as a character everyone lives to hate.  In addition, as victims linked to the brothers are targeted, intriguing murder attempts including a venomous snake hidden in flowers unfold.  While each brother is vehemently convinced the other is responsible for the homicides, viewers are left certain they know until a surprising finale proves everyone wrong.  Washing away the squeaky-clean image of his television stardom, Micky Dolenz makes an unexpected appearance in this mildly sleazy film, far from the tracks of Clarksville.  While overt violence and nudity are minimal, Night of the Strangler is an intriguing mystery centered on a racially-charged family triangle and the brotherly priest stuck in its crosshairs.

    Scanned and restored in 2K from the American Genre Film Archive’s 35mm print, Vinegar Syndrome presents Night of the Strangler in its original 1.85:1 aspect ratio for the first time ever.  Diluted of more vibrant color, the film’s wear is evident with its soft focus and moderate scratches.  In addition, dimly lit sequences demonstrate doses of flakes and speckles while the occasional cigarette burn can be spotted.  Aging artifacts aside, the less than stellar qualities never make the viewing experience unwatchable.  Instead, the film’s grindhouse battle wounds add a level of charm for those with managed expectations.  Equipped with a Dolby Digital 1.0 mix, dialogue is relayed as decently as can be while, instances of soft distortion can be heard in quieter sequences.  Spared of any overwhelming pops or cracks, sound quality is serviceable but, can be benefitted by increased volume.  Finally, no special features are included on this release.

    Continuing their fitting collaboration with the American Genre Film Archive, Vinegar Syndrome delivers another peculiar picture filled with racist richies and interracial love affairs.  Far from an exploitation free for all, Night of the Strangler boasts a decent murder mystery with a reveal audiences won’t see coming.  Starring a formerly well-trained Monkee, Director Joy N. Houck, Jr.’s (Creature from Black Lake) non-strangulating effort makes for a decent stay in the disgustingly sweaty south.  While it may not always look pretty, Vinegar Syndrome’s 2K restoration saves the film from permanent extinction and appreciatively presents it in its original aspect ratio for the first time ever.  Seeking confession for the lack of racially-charged mysteries starring Micky Dolenz?  Night of the Strangler is your only penance!

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Vinegar Syndrome, Night of the Strangler can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.