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Currently showing posts tagged Artsploitation Films

  • Blu-ray/DVD Weekly Wrap-Up #5: Gravity, Memory of the Dead, L.A. Law, Oldboy & More!

    This week's installment of the Blu-ray/DVD Weekly Wrap-Up #5 includes:

    - Gravity (2013) (0:32)
    Street Date: February 25, 2014
    Warner Bros: http://www.warnerbros.com/

    - L.A. Law Season 1 (6:27)
    Street Date: February 25, 2014
    Shout! Factory: http://www.shoutfactory.com/

    - Memory of the Dead (2011) (11:14)
    Street Date: February 25, 2014
    Artsploitation Films: http://www.artsploitationfilms.com/

    - Gotham City Serials (16:23)
    Street Date: February 4, 2014
    Mill Creek Entertainment: http://www.millcreekent.com/

    - Oldboy (2013) (19:32)
    Street Date: March 4, 2014
    Sony Pictures: http://www.sonypictures.com/

    - Farewells/Sneak Peeks (25:11)

  • Toad Road (2012) DVD Review


    Toad Road (2012)
    Director: Jason Banker
    Starring: James Davidson, Sara Anne Jones, Jim Driscoll, Scott Rader & Jamie Siebold
    Released by: Artsploitation Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Cementing their status as one of the leading forces of unique and independent cinema, Artsploitation Films teams up with Elijah Wood’s SpectreVision to invite viewers down a hallucinatory path.  Toad Road is Artsploitation Films’ first American acquisition, shot on a shoestring budget that feels akin to 1999’s The Blair Witch Project in its execution.  Honest and disturbing, Toad Road sends chills down your spine in unexpected ways that make you wish for the terror to end.  The barriers of reality and nightmares become blurred as the characters struggle to navigate in this mixture of urban myth lore and documentary.  In order to find out what truly lies on Toad Road, let’s trip out…


    This review was originally published through Euro Cult AV.  To view it in its entirety, click this link:

    http://eurocultav.com/Reviews/Toad_Road__Artsploitation_/toad_road__artsploitation_.html

  • Animals (2012) DVD Review



    Animals (2012)
    Director: Marçal Forés
    Starring: Orial Pla, Augustus Prew, Roser Tapias & Martin Freeman
    Released by: Artsploitation Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Is growing up defined by the parting of childish toys that you once cherished so much?  Somewhere between the worlds of reality and fantasy, Animals attempts to explore that question.  Hailing from Spain and marking the feature film debut of Director Marçal Forés, this unconventional story weaves a web about the innocence of childhood and the fear and pain of growing up.  Scooping up the “Best First Feature” Award and “Special Programming Award for Artistic Achievement” at OutFest 2013, Animals has intrigued audiences with its unusual, albeit relatable story.  Grab your favorite cuddly companion and let’s take a look for ourselves...

    Animals is a coming-of-age tale rooted in between the realms of fantasy and stark reality.  Pol (Orial Pla), a seventeen-year-old high school student can’t seem to come into his own age.  Pol laughs, confides in and jams to music with his English-speaking teddy bear named Deerhoof.  When a new student, Iraci (Augustus Prew, Kick-Ass 2), arrives Pol’s childhood innocence begins to crumble as he experiences his first taste of love and sexual longing.  Joined by Martin Freeman (The Hobbit) as a high school teacher, Animals spins a unique tale on love, innocence and childhood.

    MOVIE:
    Simply seeing the cover of Artsploitation Films‘ latest release and hearing it involves a boy and his talking teddy bear, may cause some to brush this off as a blatant rip-off of another foul-mouthed talking teddy bear voiced by Seth MacFarlane.  Aside from the obvious, Animals could not be more unique considering the films origins date back to a short film made in 2005.  The beauty of Animals comes in its uncertainty of the messages being relayed to the audience.  As Travis Crawford of Artsploitation Films mentions, Animals, while having little in common with the films of David Lynch, does share in the trait of provoking as many questions as it does providing answers.  The film is very much left up to the viewer to feel and work out what they believe it means.  Some may be bothered by this, but taking in a Hollywood that produces films that are so  perfectly explained by the end credits, Animals is a breath of fresh air that gives due credit to its audience.  

    Headlined by an up and coming group of young actors, the cast does a remarkable job conveying so much emotion and range throughout the film.  Scenes of Pol living out dreams of putting on a rock concert, with Deerhoof on drums, is an image anyone who ever was young can relate to.  It is Pol’s pure heart and “friends ‘til the end” motto with Deerhoof that invokes a bond that isn’t held back by anything including differences in dialect.  The practical puppetry utilized to bring Deerhoof to life is wonderful as well as his interactions with Pol.  As a mysterious new student, Iraci (Prew), enters Pol’s world his innocent bond with Deerhoof becomes threatened.  A poisonous attraction develops between the boys as Pol begins experiencing his first sexual urges and Iraci teaches him not to fear pain through use of self mutilation.  Being fixated in a childlike world, watching Pol thrust into love and sex without causing a big fuss about his sexual orientation was welcoming.  In a way, it’s fitting and childlike that Pol would not pass judgement or question what gender his attraction lies in.  As we move farther away from Pol’s innocence and deeper into his dark maturity, the viewer and Pol both long for better days gone by.  The finale of the film is certainly haunting and will solidify that the magic of childhood is something we all fear losing and desperately try to retain.  Animals is a charming and bizarre film that reminded me how scary and painful growing up can be but also that parting with your childlike spirit is never required.
    RATING: 4/5

    VIDEO:
    Animals is presented in 2.35:1 aspect ratio and looks quite remarkable.  The beautiful cinematography by Eduard Grau translates well on this disc with skin tones looking accurate and detail looking nice.  Outdoor sequences look lush and warm which makes for a pleasant viewing experience.
    RATING: 4.5/5

    AUDIO:
    Artsploitation Films offers a 5.1 Surround Sound mix that serves its purpose well.  Dialogue is clear as a whistle while subtle noises in nature scenes are picked up nicely.  Moments of rock music come out blaring, just the way we like it!  While the film utilizes its native Catalan tongue as well as moments of English, optional English subtitles with optional SDH are provided.  In addition, a 2.0 Stereo mix is also included on the disc.
    RATING: 4.5/5

    EXTRAS:

    Artsploitation Films offers a wonderful assortment of special features to cut into.

    - Making-of Featurette: This nearly 20-minute featurette interviews the cast and crew about the story, its characters, atmosphere and puppetry effects used to bring Deerhoof to life.

    - The Bear Truth: A Short Film: Award-Winning Irish filmmaker Anna Rodgers directed this short documentary, in celebration of the film, about people and their personal stories about their own teddy bears.

    - Animals: The original short film that Director Marçal Forés shot at film school in London of 2005.

    - Audio Commentary with Director Marçal Forés & Travis Crawford

    - 8-page Collectible Booklet: Artsploitation Films’ Travis Crawford interviews Director Marçal Forés in this insightful companion to the film.

    - Animals Trailer

    - Artsploitation Films Trailers

    - Reversible Cover

    RATING: 5/5

    OVERALL:
    Animals is a unique coming-of-age tale that isn’t afraid to ask a lot of questions and allow the viewer to come to their own answers.  The film captures what the magic of childhood feels like and the pain of growing up.  The young cast did remarkable work with a slightly underused yet effective Martin Freeman offering some experienced clout to the film.  Artsploitation Films‘ technical achievements are spot on along with a perfect assortment of special features to round out such an intriguing picture.  Destined to be more than a genre label, Artsploitation Films has managed to deliver yet another strong film that deserves to be seen by more people.  Hats off to the label that is quickly becoming the dark horse with exciting and unpredictable films to look out for.
    RATING: 4.5/5

  • Horror Stories (2012) DVD Review



    Horror Stories (2012)
    Director(s): Kyu-dong Min, Bum-shik Jung, Dae-woong Lim, Ji-Yeong Hong, Gok Kim & Sun Kim
    Starring: Ji-won Kim, Tae-woo Kim, Bo-ra Nam, Mi-ran Ra & Yeon-Seok Yoo
    Released by: Artsploitation Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Anthology films have been around for decades dating back to 1945’s Dead of Night all the way to the highly successful Creepshow from 1982.  As years progressed, the likelihood of witnessing a new anthology based film seemed near impossible as their popularity waned.  Within the past few years, countless horror anthologies have emerged including Trick ‘r Treat, V/H/S and The ABCs of Death.  In 2012, six of Korea’s top genre directors formed to create an anthology film like no other.  One where the wraparound segment, mostly used for gimmicky-like interludes in other films, was as horrifying as the actual short tales.  Horror Stories makes a bold challenge but does it live up to its intent?  Let’s take a look…

    Horror Stories collects six of South Korea’s top directors to tell four horrifying stories that are framed through a wraparound segment (directed by Kyu-dong Min of Memento Mori fame) that finds a high school girl abducted and forced by a psychopath to tell him the most frightening tales she knows.  Her stories include Don’t Answer the Door, directed by Bum-shink Jung (Epitaph), which finds a young brother and sister home alone and under attack by an intruder.  In Director Dae-woong Lim’s (Bloody Reunion) Endless Flight, a serial killer escapes police custody while onboard an otherwise empty flight.  Secret Recipe, directed by Ji-Yeong Hong, tells a macabre fairy tale about two jealous stepsisters who take plastic surgery to the extreme.  Finally, brothers Gok & Sun Kim (White: The Melody of the Curse) direct Ambulance on the Death Zone, a claustrophobic zombie tale detailing the standoff between a paramedic and a mother over the possibility of her daughter being infected.

    MOVIE:
    Being a strong enthusiast of the horror anthology format, Horror Stories immediately peaked my interest.  The outcome exceeded my expectations on every level and ultimately left me chilled to the bone.  The no-nonsense wraparound segment set a frighting tone to the film from the first frame.  The madness seen in the eyes of the serial killer keeping a high school girl captive leaves you disturbed knowing people of this ilk actually exist.  The first and arguably most terrifying segment, Don’t Answer the Phone, made me jump more times then I care to remember.  The end of the segment would make one assume the nightmare is over when in reality its just begun.  Director Bum-shink Jung weaves a suspenseful tale that concludes with an ambitious commentary on Korean employment and economy.  The grim ending truly makes one question whether the fairy tale we just witnessed or the real world reality is more horrifying.  Endless Flight received immediate praise for taking terror back into the skies which brought fond memories back of an anthology favorite found in Twilight Zone: The Movie.  While, the terror in this film is not found in the shape of a monstrous unearthly creature, its almost scarier because we are dealing with a flesh and blood serial killer.  A scene that includes a door peephole and a hairpin will make even the bravest squeam.  Director Ji-Yeong Hong’s Secret Recipe takes two jealous stepsisters and their obsession to wed a plastic surgeon obsessed with eternal youth to twisted heights.  The emphasis on plastic surgery that was utilized so well in another 2012 effort, American Mary, is used more subtly to show how far people will go to obtain what they want.  Nightmarish imagery and a dose of cannibalism makes this a bizarre and unforgettable inclusion.  The final segment, Ambulance on the Death Zone, is quite possibly the most creative of the bunch and proves how effective a zombie tale can be within the constrains of one location and less than a handful of actors.  The standoff between the mother and the paramedic makes the audience believe that the possibly infected daughter is truly infected and the mother doesn’t want to accept it.  Interestingly enough, as the tales continues, the daughter isn’t seen succumbing to the zombie infection as quickly as we’d assume which keeps you guessing until the finale.  The segment is incredibly effective in its delivery and sprays plenty of the red stuff which is always a plus for a zombie flick.  Horror Stories is an incredible execution in suspense and terror with each segment succeeding in making you jump.  The film is quoted on the back of its DVD release as being “one of the scariest Asian horror anthologies of the 21st century”, a gracious compliment indeed but slightly off.  Horror Stories is not just one of the scariest Asian horror anthologies, it’s one the scariest anthologies ever!
    RATING: 5/5

    VIDEO:
    Artsploitation Films presents Horror Stories in 2.35:1 aspect ratio.  The film looks quite nice on DVD with skin tones appearing as natural as can be.  Unfortunately, scenes of darker light (which there are many), have slightly crushed black levels that leaves pixelation to be found.  Colors look decent with images of blood popping nicely.  A serviceable transfer but one that could have looked a bit better.
    RATING: 3.5/5

    AUDIO:
    Horror Stories is presented in its native Korean language in 2.0 Stereo.  Sound quality is nice and robust with dialogue and subtle noises coming across without a hitch.  English subtitles are also provided.
    RATING: 4/5

    EXTRAS:

    - Cast Interviews

    - 12-page collectible booklet: This wonderful companion to the film has two essays entitled Omnibus Onslaught by Travis Crawford and The Terror of Modern Subjectivity: An Overview of Contemporary Korean Horror Cinema by Kyu Hyun Kim.  In addition, A Fairy Tale of the Sun and Moon, an interview with Director Bum-shik Jung conducted by Travis Crawford is included.

    - Reversible cover

    RATING: 4/5

    OVERALL:
    Horror Stories was a masterful demonstration of four frightening tales all wrapped up in one supreme package.  Every segment possessed immense style and packed enough scares to chill me to the bone.  As we mature and age, it becomes difficult to truly “scare” someone who was raised on genre cinema but “Horror Stories” managed to do just that in spades.  As Kyu Hyun Kim mentions, North American consumers may believe that Korean horror is simply just a variation of the J-wave of horror from Japan showcased in The Ring and Ju-On franchises.  If you’re looking for long haired ghosts that are in desperate need of a chiropractor, look elsewhere because if Horror Stories is an indication of the best Korean horror then the future looks very bright.  Artsploitation Films‘ presentation of the film is serviceable enough and the booklet included is a wonderful read that offers very scholarly approaches to the content.  Artsploitation Films should be praised for bringing such a terrifying and rewarding film stateside and their future in distributing unique and unsettling films is one I anxiously look forward to.  The strength of the film itself gets my highest recommendation as an anthology that deserves to be seen by anyone looking to be truly frightened.
    RATING: 5/5