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  • The Dead Room (2015) Blu-ray Review

    The Dead Room (2015)

    Director: Jason Stutter

    Starring: Jed Brophy, Jeffrey Thomas & Laura Petersen

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set in New Zealand, The Dead Room centers on a trio of ghost hunters as they investigate strange happenings at an abandoned farmhouse.  Before long, skepticism morphs into full-blown fear when supernatural forces make their presence known to the unwanted visitors.

    Inspired by the local legend of Central Otago, New Zealand, the contrasting methods of science and faith converge to uncover the unsettling truths behind a haunted home in this slow-build snoozer.  Descending upon the forsaken abode, two technologically savvy and scientifically minded paranormal investigators (Jed Brophy, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and Jeffrey Thomas, The Light Between Oceans respectively) joined by twentysomething medium Holly (Laura Petersen, Shopping) waste little time rigging their equipment in hopes of capturing evidence of the otherworldly to no such avail.  With little exposition and minimal character development, The Dead Room crawls at a snail’s pace before yawn-inducing bumps in the night and howling winds finally signal the trio’s cameras and nerves into believing ghostly apparitions are near.  While Holly intuitively senses her intrusion upon the homestead, uneasy techie Liam is urged by his scientific superior Scott to remain together until conclusive evidence can be obtained of their supposed haunting.  Swinging doors and thrown furniture continue the parlor tricks of the entity as onscreen fear fails to convert restless viewers.  With a promising setup and breezy runtime, The Dead Room attempts to desperately possess audiences in its fleeting moments with the discovery of an unexpected guest and a ghostly twist that feels far too rushed and questionably unexpected to make any redeeming impact.  Establishing little to no emotional connection to its characters and making sluggish strides in suspense, The Dead Room is unfortunately all bark and no bite.

    Scream Factory presents The Dead Room with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Reading expectedly sharp for a feature of its era, skin tones from Holly’s pale-pigment to the aging lines of lead scientist Scott are natural and well-defined.  Meanwhile, textures in the green and purple wall paint of the haunted home are strongly relayed with black levels appearing generally inky with no heavy instances of crush with only minimal splotchiness in facial features during the film’s basement set climax.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is effortlessly handled with the creaky floors, glass breaking and door slamming sound effects of the specter making excellent motions on the track.  In addition, an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix has also been provided.  Lastly, the disc’s sole supplement is the film’s Trailer (1:43).

    Exhaustively sedate and gapingly monotonous, The Dead Room strives to use its slow-pace and less is more approach to its strengths while, colorless character development and uneventful occurrences sacrifice its true potential.  Shortchanging its runtime and concluding on a go for broke jump scare, the Kiwi-based production gravely disappoints whereas its high-def presentation at least makes worthwhile strides in its crisp photography and effective soundscape.

    RATING: 2.5/5

    Available now from Scream Factory, The Dead Room can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Jeepers Creepers (2001) / Jeepers Creepers 2 (2003) Collector's Editions Blu-ray Reviews

    Jeepers Creepers (2001) / Jeepers Creepers 2 (2003)

    Director: Victor Salva

    Starring: Gina Philips, Justin Long, Jonathan Breck & Eileen Brennan / Ray Wise, Jonathan Breck, Eric Nenninger, Nicki Aycox & Luke Edwards 

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Knowing precisely what’s eating horror fans, Scream Factory, the horror/cult offshoot of Shout! Factory, presents the definitive home video releases of Director Victor Salva’s (Powder) modern monster features!  In Jeepers Creepers, siblings Trish (Gina Philips, Chained) and Darry (Justin Long, Tusk) are nearly ran off a desolate highway road only to later investigate what they believe are bodies being disposed of down a sewer pipe.  Literally biting off more than they can chew, the terrified teens find themselves targeted by a mysterious monster with a scent for fear.  Next up, Jeepers Creepers 2 centers on a broken down school bus transporting a team of high school athletes who have just become the Creeper’s newest course of flesh.  Testing their fears and own loyalty to one another, the team must stick together in order to survive the final night of the monster’s feeding cycle.   

    Debuting at the tail end of the waining slasher movie cycle, Jeepers Creepers is a consummately constructed ode to the monster movies of yesteryear with an antagonist that appropriately remains shrouded in the shadows and free of a deconstructive backstory.  Headlined by up and comers Gina Philips and Justin Long, the rural set shriekfest wisely makes the leads brother and sister in order to shatter the predictable lovers in peril scenario with the film’s focus prominently placed on their fear of what’s stalking them.  From a tense road game between the traveling teens and an eerie high-speed truck, Jeepers Creepers submerges viewers into the grim underworld of its monster as Trish and Darry foolishly investigate their attackers homestead only to discover a mausoleum of death.  Seeking salvation from the proper authorities, the unsuspecting officers are no match for what awaits them, ultimately leaving the siblings to fend for themselves.  Excellently performed by Jonathan Breck (Everybody Wants Some!!) while doused in impressive makeup design work, the mysterious otherworldly creature packs a sufficiently scary presence with only its computer-generated wingspan showing its age.  Sniffing out the desirable scent of fear, the film’s climax at a blacked-out police station welcomes several opportunities for jump scares and a tense conclusion that surprisingly doesn’t include a celebratory moment of relief for its survivors.  A box-office smash during its original release, Jeepers Creepers was a refreshing jolt of fear during a time when the genre found itself scatterbrained yet again.  Aging gracefully with a simplistic story that makes terror its central priority, Jeepers Creepers still entertains accordingly.

    Emerging two years after its predecessors instant success and downward slide following the September 11th attacks, Jeepers Creepers 2 returns to the scene with its terrorizing monster hungry for seconds.  Following the attack and abduction of his young son, Jack Taggart Sr. (Ray Wise, RoboCop), vows to take vengeance on the winged creature responsible.  Juxtaposing to the final day of the creature’s last eating cycle for the next 23 years, a school bus of athletes are stranded on a backcountry highway with jealousy, racial tension and homophobia tearing them apart.  As nightfall comes, the Creeper sets his sights on the tattered bus, sniffing out his potential victims in what proves to be the longest night of the students’ young lives.  With a larger budget and a bigger cast, Jeepers Creepers 2 follows common sequel tropes by increasing the body count and action set pieces yet, lacking the more intimate punch of its originator.  In addition, although Justin Long returns in a ghostly dream sequence warning clairvoyant cheerleader Minxie (Nicki Aycox, Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead) of the doom awaiting her friends, the lack of former lead Gina Philips also returning greatly disappoints while, the current crop of characters are mostly unlikeable and almost always out for themselves.  Fortunately, the Creeper is far more high-powered in his latest outing, taking to the skies more frequently and serving up an especially fun decapitation via wing.  Restraining the cast to the enclosed school bus for the bulk of its runtime backfires as the thrills decrease with each passing minute while, Ray Wise’s revenge plot, awesomely carried out by a makeshift harpoon, arrives much later than anticipated.  Exceeding the box-office performance of the original film, Jeepers Creepers 2 proved there was more bite left in the franchise with plans for a third movie still being touted.  While the Creeper truly comes into greater form in the sequel and allows for a larger playing field for its action, Jeepers Creepers 2 ultimately lacks the tighter eeriness of its first effort.            

    Previously released in high-definition by MGM, Scream Factory presents both films with 1080p transfers, sporting 1.85:1 and 2.35:1 aspect ratios respectively.  With the original film bearing a new 2K scan of the interpositive, the sunny, rural exteriors appear even more lush than before while, skin tones are topnotch and black levels appear sharply inky with only fleeting instances of speckling.  Meanwhile, its sequel, presumably carrying its originally released transfer, remains equally as pleasing.  Equipped with DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mixes, each film makes dialogue prioritized for maximum clarity while, the films suspenseful scores and emphasis on gunshots and expected screams give tremendous rise to their designated sequences.  Furthermore, both film comes equipped with optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mixes as well.  

    Joining the ranks of Scream Factory’s lauded Collector’s Editions, Jeepers Creepers arrives with a new Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Victor Salva and Stars Gina Philips & Justin Long plus, a vintage Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Victor Salva.  Located on the original film’s second disc, Jeepers Creepers: Then and Now (36:45) is a newly recorded look back at the film, its making and continued impact with new insight from Writer/Director Victor Salva, Producer Barry Opper, Director of Photography Don FauntLeRoy, Editor Ed Marx and Actor Tom Tarantini.  Also included, From Critters to Creepers with Barry Opper (19:38) sits down with the film’s producer as he discusses his career highlights leading up to Salva’s monster movie including work on Android and the Critters franchise.  Next up, The Town Psychic with Patricia Belcher (16:34) catches up with the film’s clairvoyant character and how she landed the role while, Behind the Peepers: The Making of Jeepers Creepers (59:02) is ported over from its previous release alongside Deleted Scenes (17:13), a Photo Gallery (7:56), the Theatrical Trailer (1:54), a Radio Spot (1:00) and Reversible Cover Art featuring the film’s original 1-sheet design rounding the abundance of special features.

    Surprisingly more packed than the previous film, Jeepers Creepers 2 kicks off disc 1 with an Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Victor Salva and Stars Eric Nenninger, Josh Hammon, Nicki Lynn Aycox, Marieh Delfino, Garikayi Mutambirwa & Shaun Fleming.  In addition, a second Audio Commentary with Actor Jonathan Breck, Production Illustrator Brad Parker & Special Effects Makeup Artist Brian Penikas is also included.  Located on its second disc, Jeepers Creepers 2: Then and Now (22:34) finds Writer/Director Victor Salva, Producer Barry Opper, Director of Photography Don FauntLeRoy, Editor Ed Marx and Actor Tom Tarantin returning to discuss the success of the original film and the steps to produce a sequel of equal worth.  Next up, A Father’s Revenge with Ray Wise (15:20) captures a newly recorded sit-down with Wise on his involvement in the project and his love for horror while, Don’t Get off the Bus! (20:52) finds Actors Tom Tarantini, Thom Gossom Jr. and Diane Delano also reminiscing on their experiences.  Vintage supplements ported over include, A Day in Hell: A Look at the Filming of Jeepers Creepers 2 (26:43), Light, Camera, Creeper: The Making of Jeepers Creepers 2 (14:23), Creeper Creation (11:29), Jeepers Creepers 2: The Orphanage Visual Effects Reel (5:23) and Creeper Composer (9:26) featuring interviews with Composer Bennett Salvay and Writer/Director Victor Salva.  Finally, Storyboards (5:35), Deleted Scenes (15:51), two Photo Galleries (15:37), the Theatrical Trailer (2:13) and a Reversible Cover Art sporting the original 1-sheet design concludes the extensive bonus features.

    Separating the art and scandal of its creator, Writer/Director Victor Salva’s twosome of creepy efforts gave modern audiences a new and effectively realized monster of their own.  While the original Jeepers Creepers may be imperfect in its own right, its smaller-scale and mysterious aura of its antagonist makes it the preferred feature to its bigger budgeted and increasingly tiresome sequel.  Making previously available releases virtually unneeded, Scream Factory’s Collector’s Editions are a treasure trove of high quality with their expansive special features requiring two discs to be contained.  Topped off with phenomenal new cover designs by fan-favorite artist Justin Osbourn (Phantom of the Paradise), both releases will surely fill up hungry horror fans.

    Jeepers Creepers RATING: 4/5

    Jeepers Creepers 2 RATING: 3.5/5

    Available June 14th from Scream Factory, Jeepers Creepers and Jeepers Creepers 2 can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Inside Out 3D Ultimate Collector's Edition (2015) Blu-ray Review

    Inside Out (2015)

    Director: Pete Docter

    Starring: Amy Poehler, Phyllis Smith, Bill Hader, Lewis Black & Mindy Kaling

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From the director of Monsters Inc. and Up, Inside Out travels into the mind of 11-year-old Riley as she emotionally processes her move to a new city.  With the optimistic Joy (Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation) and her fellow emotions Sadness (Phyllis Smith, The Office), Fear (Bill Hader, Trainwreck), Anger (Lewis Black, The Daily Show) and Disgust (Mindy Kaling, The Mindy Project), the contrasting quintet brace themselves for an adventure of self discovery.  Richard Kind (Spin City), Diane Lane (Secretariat) and Kyle MacLachlan (Twin Peaks) provide additional vocal talent.

    Breaking new ground in the form of animated storytelling, Inside Out takes viewers on an ingenious journey through the inner workings of an emotionally evolving young girl.  Abruptly whisked away from her idyllic home in Minnesota to the unfamiliar San Francisco, Riley’s once happy existence is traumatically challenged.  Processing the life-changing events are Riley’s gamut of emotions Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger and Disgust as the colorful characters strive to stabilize Riley’s rocky feelings.  Determined to right the ship, Joy and her fellow cohorts find themselves overwhelmed by the always gloomy Sadness as their control center begins rapidly changing with Riley’s increasing unhappiness.  As chaos ensues and previously happy memories are compromised, Joy’s frantic attempts at repair results in her and Sadness transplanted to the complex dwellings of Riley’s long-term memories.  While the remaining emotions only cause Riley to grow more distant from her parents, Joy and Sadness navigate the labyrinth of her subconscious and encounter imaginative characters while, learning invaluable information about their feelings in order for Riley to be whole once again.

    Complimented by a perfectly selected voice cast, Inside Out gives life to the ever-changing quirks that make us tick with knee-slapping humor and immense heart.  From Fear’s hilariously paranoid personality and Anger’s constant desire to curse to the film’s wickedly smart explanations behind our ability to retain selected memories, Inside Out explores the bowels of the human psyche unlike any film before.  Simultaneously absorbing Riley’s personal journey and her emotions own epic misadventure, audiences’ hearts are consistently tugged between characters they care the world for.  Following Joy and Sadnesses encounter with Riley’s former imaginary friend Bing Bong (Kind) and his selfless fate, viewers will be unquestionably left teary-eyed.  Remarkably constructed and emotionally captivating, Director Pete Docter’s imaginative investigation of our feelings is a visual triumph and the latest in Pixar’s modern day masterpieces.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Inside Out with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Capturing the boldly defined colors of its emotional characters and their sprawling control center, picture quality is immaculate.  Detail found in the illuminating glow of Joy and the lightly fuzzy skin of her co-stars is astounding while, black levels, most appreciatively during Joy and Bing Bong’s escape from the Memory Dump, are deeply inky and free of any crushing artifacts.  Echoing the high standards of previously released Pixar productions, Inside Out look flawless.  In addition, its 3D counterpart located on Disc 2 is beautifully immersive, inviting viewers into its unique world with remarkable depth easily making it one of the year’s finest examples of 3D entertainment.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is excellently prioritized with strong fidelity throughout.  The delicate key strokes of Composer Michael Giacchino’s score are beautifully relayed while, the crumbling sounds of Riley’s personality islands maintain a thunderous presence resulting in a universally applauded mix.  Special features located on Disc 1 include, an Audio Commentary with Director Pete Docter & Co-Director Ronnie Del Carmen, Lava (7:12), Director James Ford Murphy’s short film about a lovesick volcano that preceded Inside Out theatrically looks lovely and contains a hauntingly beautiful ukulele tune but, lacks the memorability of past shorts.  In addition, the all-new short Riley’s First Date? (4:40) finds Inside Out’s human star embarking on possibly her first date much to the uneasiness of her father who hysterically bonds with her date over AC/DC.  Also included, Path to Pixar: The Women of Inside Out (11:22) is an inspirational look at the female artists and voice talent who share their childhood ambitions and sage advice with viewers.  Finally, Mixed Emotions (7:17) focuses on the intensive research developing the film’s emotional characters and their appearances while, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Disney: Infinity 3.0, Aulani - Disney Resort & Spa (0:32), Disney Movies Anywhere (0:40), The Good Dinosaur (1:14), Toy Story That Time Forgot (0:59) and Tomorrowland (0:50) round out the disc’s supplements.  

    Additionally, more special features located on Disc 3 include, a multi-part Behind the Scenes series comprised of Story of the Story (10:30), Mapping the Mind (8:24), Our Dad, the Filmmakers (7:25), Into the Unknown: The Sound of Inside Out (7:09), The Misunderstood Art of Animation Film Editing (4:43) and Mind Candy (14:26).  Furthermore, Deleted Scenes (16:53), Trailers for Remember (1:38), Experience (2:19) and the Japan Trailer (2:30) can also be found with a DVD edition and Digital HD Code rounding out the remaining extras.

    Following their timeless classics of talking toys and virtually speechless robots, Inside Out joins the ranks of Pixar’s most endearing and deeply original concepts.  Starring and conjuring a variety of emotions for viewers, Director Pete Docter’s most daring effort to date is a masterful accomplishment that blends imagination and heart effortlessly.  Exceptionally presented, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment delivers Inside Out with pristine technical grades, top-quality 3D and a handsome dose of additional bonus content.  Distinct and powerfully moving, Inside Out is the animated gem of the year!

    RATING: 5/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Inside Out can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • It Follows (2014) Blu-ray Review

    It Follows (2014)

    Director: David Robert Mitchell

    Starring: Maika Monroe, Keir Gilchrist, Olivia Luccardi, Lili Sepe, Daniel Zovatto & Jake Weary

    Released by: Anchor Bay Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    For gorgeous college student Jay Height (Maika Monroe,The Guest) life couldn’t be better until, an innocent date and sexual encounter takes place, plaguing Jay with nightmarish visions and paranoia that something is after her.  Comforted by her sister and friends, Jay must find a way to combat the evil entity before it’s too late.  Keir Gilchrist (It’s Kind of a Funny Story), Olivia Luccardi (The Rewrite), Lili Sepe (Spork), Daniel Zovatto (Beneath) and Jake Weary (As the World Turns) co-stars.

    From the director of The Myth of the American Sleepover, It Follows is far from an easily describable film but, one that captures the very foundation of subconscious fear.  Simply stated, following a should-be romantic date and a steamy sexual encounter in the backseat of a car, the beautiful Jay Height (Monroe) is struck with a startling sense of fear that an unknown force is stalking her.  Forewarned after being set up by her date, Jay has inherited the evil being as she questions her sanity and turns to her sister and friends for protection.  While its premise feels anything less than ordinary by genre standards, It Follows taps into a dreadful tone found only in nightmares responsible for countless sleepless nights.  Objecting to drown itself in expositions, the film is reliant on its unsettling atmosphere and the entities unrelenting will to follow its victims to separate itself from the crowd.  Constantly altering its appearance from a scantly clad elder woman to a freakishly tall man lacking eyes, the supernatural force perfectly embodies dream logic with little rhyme or reason for its existence while, never failing to startle the audience.  For as unsettling as the many faces of “it” appear to be, It Follows is also aided by its unidentifiable time period set in Detroit, Michigan.  With a cellphone making a minor appearance, household appliances, vintage station wagons and outdated appliances including, tube televisions and characters only witnessing black and white films continue to cement the film’s surreal logic of not quite grasping where you are.  In addition, Composer Disasterpeace’s score of tranquil and aggressive synthesizer use is unlike any score heard in decades that feels familiar yet, wildly unique.  Influenced by the works of John Carpenter, Disasterpeace’s applauded efforts take shape as a character of their own, startling viewers at every dramatic turn.  Unsurprisingly, some may be left with more questions than answers regarding the film’s narrative while, akin to our most chilling nightmares of little to no explanation, It Follows runs its course like a fever dream of fear, leaving viewers sometimes unsure but nonetheless terrified.

    Anchor Bay Entertainment presents It Follows with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Demonstrating excellent clarity and bold colors, the transfer shines with its naturally pleasing skin tones and admirably handled inky black levels.  Free of any digital rendering or intrusive anomalies, It Follows looks pitch perfect.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, dialogue is always audible, even during the film’s many hushed moments.  In addition, Disasterpeace’s lauded synth score is beautifully handled offering a powerful effect leaving listeners in a state of absolute bliss with its mix.  Although falling on the lighter side, special features include, an Audio Commentary hosted by Scott Weinberg of Nerdist fame with Critics Eric O. Snider (Moviebs), Britt Hayes (Screencrush), Samuel D. Zimmerman (Shock Till You Drop), Alison Natasi (Flavorwire) and Eric Vespe (Ain’t It Cool News).  In addition, A Conversation with Film Composer Disasterpeace (4:56), the Theatrical Trailer (2:13), a Poster Art Gallery (5 in total) and a Digital HD Code are also included.  

    Hailed by many as an instant classic, It Follows is a daring exploration of fear that oozes originality.  With a naturalistic, likable cast and an addictive score from another era, Director David Robert Mitchell’s terrifying tale of dream logic hits all the right notes for those willing to surrender themselves to its abstract sensibilities.  Complimenting the film’s quality, Anchor Bay Entertainment succeeds with a flawless transfer and audio mix although, a juicier supplemental package would have been most appreciated.  Creepy and refreshing, It Follows will bring your nightmares to life.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available July 14th from Anchor Bay Entertainment, It Follows can be purchased via Amazon.com