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Currently showing posts tagged Haunting

  • The Dead Room (2015) Blu-ray Review

    The Dead Room (2015)

    Director: Jason Stutter

    Starring: Jed Brophy, Jeffrey Thomas & Laura Petersen

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set in New Zealand, The Dead Room centers on a trio of ghost hunters as they investigate strange happenings at an abandoned farmhouse.  Before long, skepticism morphs into full-blown fear when supernatural forces make their presence known to the unwanted visitors.

    Inspired by the local legend of Central Otago, New Zealand, the contrasting methods of science and faith converge to uncover the unsettling truths behind a haunted home in this slow-build snoozer.  Descending upon the forsaken abode, two technologically savvy and scientifically minded paranormal investigators (Jed Brophy, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and Jeffrey Thomas, The Light Between Oceans respectively) joined by twentysomething medium Holly (Laura Petersen, Shopping) waste little time rigging their equipment in hopes of capturing evidence of the otherworldly to no such avail.  With little exposition and minimal character development, The Dead Room crawls at a snail’s pace before yawn-inducing bumps in the night and howling winds finally signal the trio’s cameras and nerves into believing ghostly apparitions are near.  While Holly intuitively senses her intrusion upon the homestead, uneasy techie Liam is urged by his scientific superior Scott to remain together until conclusive evidence can be obtained of their supposed haunting.  Swinging doors and thrown furniture continue the parlor tricks of the entity as onscreen fear fails to convert restless viewers.  With a promising setup and breezy runtime, The Dead Room attempts to desperately possess audiences in its fleeting moments with the discovery of an unexpected guest and a ghostly twist that feels far too rushed and questionably unexpected to make any redeeming impact.  Establishing little to no emotional connection to its characters and making sluggish strides in suspense, The Dead Room is unfortunately all bark and no bite.

    Scream Factory presents The Dead Room with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Reading expectedly sharp for a feature of its era, skin tones from Holly’s pale-pigment to the aging lines of lead scientist Scott are natural and well-defined.  Meanwhile, textures in the green and purple wall paint of the haunted home are strongly relayed with black levels appearing generally inky with no heavy instances of crush with only minimal splotchiness in facial features during the film’s basement set climax.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is effortlessly handled with the creaky floors, glass breaking and door slamming sound effects of the specter making excellent motions on the track.  In addition, an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix has also been provided.  Lastly, the disc’s sole supplement is the film’s Trailer (1:43).

    Exhaustively sedate and gapingly monotonous, The Dead Room strives to use its slow-pace and less is more approach to its strengths while, colorless character development and uneventful occurrences sacrifice its true potential.  Shortchanging its runtime and concluding on a go for broke jump scare, the Kiwi-based production gravely disappoints whereas its high-def presentation at least makes worthwhile strides in its crisp photography and effective soundscape.

    RATING: 2.5/5

    Available now from Scream Factory, The Dead Room can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Clown (2014) Blu-ray Review

    Clown (2014)

    Director: Jon Watts

    Starring: Laura Allen, Andy Powers & Peter Stormare

    Released by: Anchor Bay Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    After the entertainment for his young son’s birthday fails to arrive, Clown finds loving father Kent (Andy Powers, In Her Shoes) donning a clown suit and makeup to perform.  Unfortunately, over time the vintage costume and wig refuses to come off, simultaneously altering Kent’s personality into something demonic.  With little hope for a cure, the once wholesome father finds himself in a circus of nightmares that places his family in dire straits.  Laura Allen (The 4400) and Peter Stormare (22 Jump Street) co-star.

    Conceived from a clever mock trailer deceivingly billing eventual Producer Eli Roth (Cabin Fever, The Green Inferno) as its helmer, Clown spotlights the fear-inducing carny figure under unique circumstances as a cobweb infested vintage costume serves as the carrier of evil for an unsuspecting father.  Uniquely crafted, Jon Watts’ (Cop Car, Marvel Studios’ upcoming Spider-Man: Homecoming) feature-length directorial debut wastes little time establishing the idyllic family life Kent and wife Meg (Allen) live as they celebrate the birthday of their son Jack (Christian Distefano, PAW Patrol) before peculiar events strike.  Experiencing extreme difficulty in removing the clown nose and full body costume discovered in a mysterious traveling trunk, Kent grows frantic when even power tools fail to sever a single stitch.  Developing a voracious hunger, the real estate agent in clown’s clothing finds answers in the costume’s previous owner Herbert Karlsson (Stormare) who reveals the sinister past of the clown through history and its insatiable appetite for children.  Failing to fatally eliminate the demon’s carrier, Kent, progressively becoming more clown-like, evades death to feed while, Karlsson and Meg join forces to stop a big top reign of blood.

    Shot quickly and cheaply, several years of domestic delays and increased buildup escalated the occasionally creepy feature to heights impossible to live up to.  Presenting one of the better clown designs in recent memory with a grim pursuit of children through Chuck E. Cheese ball pits and unapologetically leaving gallons of prepubescent blood in the demon jester’s wake, Clown also adds a possessed dog in need of decapitation and rainbow spewing body liquid as Kent attempts to unsuccessfully take his life several times.  Greatly suffering from severe pacing issues that jeopardizes the film’s initial suspense, Clown possesses genuine moments of eeriness yet, not nearly enough to leave a lasting impression.

    Anchor Bay Entertainment presents Clown with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Maintaining a softer approach that keeps detail and otherwise more impactful colors mildly restrained, the digitally shot feature is decently presented and appears true to its intended palette.  Although, black levels lack a deeper inkiness common in other modern features resulting in murkier presentations that are mediocre at best.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is greatly prioritized while, the film’s inclusions of heavy bass notes during intense moments of screams and other frights make the track a nice compliment to its onscreen theatrics.  Containing only one supplement, Making Clown (6:24) is a fairly standard EPK with talking heads Eli Roth, Star Laura Allen, Cinematographer Matthew Santo and others discussing the film and their various contributions to it.  In addition, a Digital HD Code has also been included.

    Anticipated for far too long, Clown’s delayed release may have generated welcome buzz yet, its finished product, littered with pacing misfires and an otherwise interesting plot gone dull, diminishes the promise it once had.  While jolts of creativity are contained within, Director Jon Watts has graduated to far better projects that display his talents to much greater effect.  Given its long road to home video, special features are regrettably nominal while, Anchor Bay Entertainment’s presentation is pleasing enough.  

    RATING: 2.5/5

    Available August 23rd from Anchor Bay Entertainment, Clown can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Sorceress (1995) Blu-ray Review

    Sorceress (1995)

    Director: Jim Wynorski

    Starring: Larry Poindexter, Rochelle Swanson, Julie Strain, Linda Blair, Edward Albert, Michael Parks & William Marshall

    Released by: Synapse Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Presented in its uncensored director approved form, Sorceress centers on ambitious attorney Larry Barnes (Larry Poindexter, American Ninja 2: The Confrontation) as he zeroes in on a partnership at a respected law firm.  In an effort to ensure Larry’s success, his witch dabbling wife Erica (Julie Strain, Heavy Metal 2000) works her dark magic to tragically weed out his competition, Howard Reynolds (Edward Albert, Galaxy of Terror).  Understandably incensed, Howard’s wife Amelia (Linda Blair, The Exorcist) plots her own revenge using similar powers.

    Billed under its original Temptress title card, Sorceress is an erotically charged, cheaply budgeted effort starring a bevy of buxom babes who make clothes a chore to keep on.  Produced in a whopping 12 days, exploitation maverick Jim Wynorski (Chopping Mall, Deathstalker II) brings his appetite for attractive actresses and glorified nudity to the forefront while the film’s witchcraft focused narrative takes a backseat to the oil-lathered bodies on display.  After his black magic worshipping wife meets a tragic end, Larry Barnes attempts to move on with his life by focusing on his career and reuniting with former flame Carol (Rochelle Swanson, Secret Games 3).  Haunted by Erica’s sexually restless spirit, Larry notices dramatic changes in Carol’s behavior while, Amelia, wife to Larry’s crippled former competition, puppet masters a seductively deadly revenge plot against the handsome hunk.  With the exception of a forgettable subplot involving a subdued Michael Parks (Red State), Sorceress keeps viewers hot and bothered with sexy sequences allowing star Larry Poindexter to sleep with virtually every pretty face in the cast.  Featuring more steamy footage and extra nudity than ever before, Wynorski’s bonafide Skinemax-style sizzler showcases Penthouse Pet of the Year Julie Strain baring all with toe-sucking lesbian love sessions also included for good measure.  While plot is surely secondary to its visual proceedings, Sorceress remains a nostalgic reminder of late night encounters with scandalous content.  Promising healthy doses of T&A and soft-core fornication, Jim Wynorski’s coven of kinkiness is sure to bewitch genre aficionados.

    Boasting a new 2K scan from uncut vault materials, Synapse Films presents Sorceress with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Decidedly lush with excellent detail found on body sweat and natural skin tones to match, Wynorski’s nudie witch flick impresses with solid black levels during its many dimly lit sequences with no noticeable age-related damage to report.  Joined by a respectable DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, special features include, an Audio Commentary with Director Jim Wynorski and a second Audio Commentary with Director Jim Wynorski and Special Guest, SPFX Make-Up Artist/Actor/Director Tom Savini.  Recorded during the Cinema Wasteland convention, Wynorski and Savini have a hoot drunkenly commentate over the film with Savini’s childlike glee for T&A serving as a hilarious highlight.

    Ushered direct-to-video upon its initial release and popping up during the wee hours on television, Sorceress is a red-hot opus starring even hotter players that cast wicked spells and suffer from insatiable appetites for lovemaking.  Featuring the sexiness of horror goddesses and Penthouse Pets, Wynorski’s low-budget skin flick will greatly appeal to all exploitation horndogs with a penchant for the B-moviemakers efforts.  Preserving the film’s never-before-seen uncut version, Synapse Films treats viewers with a typically solid HD presentation and two enjoyable commentary tracks that are nearly as attention grabbing as the film’s rampant nudity.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available June 14th from Synapse Films, Sorceress can be purchased via Synapse-Films.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • The Witch (2015) Blu-ray Review

    The Witch (2015)

    Director: Robert Eggers

    Starring: Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger & Lucas Dawson

    Released by: Lionsgate

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set in 17th century New England, The Witch finds a banished Puritan family building a new home for themselves in the peaceful wilderness only to unravel following the mysterious disappearance of their newborn child.  Further tested by the demise of their crops and other questionable occurrences, the family suspects a powerful evil has targeted them.  Marking the impressive directorial debut of Robert Eggers, The Witch is a bleak and occasionally unsettling folktale of a religiously dedicated family come undone by tragedy and accusations.  Hauntingly atmospheric and scripted with historically accurate dialogue, Eggers’ fever dream of rural witchcraft may be slow-building yet, its nightmarish imagery of an elderly witch bathing in the blood of an infant and a crow pecking away at a woman’s breast make for some of the film’s more unnervingly memorable moments.  With rewarding performances all around, newcomers Anya Taylor-Joy (Atlantis) appearing as the film’s oldest daughter Thomasin and Harvey Scrimshaw (Oranges and Sunshine) as her younger brother Caleb give especially strong deliveries, The Witch is at its best the deeper the devil divides the unfortunate family as hope for salivation becomes impossible.  Lushly photographed and booming with remarkable production design, The Witch occasionally suffers from a laborious pace but, demonstrates a bold achievement for Eggers and his keen attention to detail that will undoubtedly serve him well in future efforts.

    Lionsgate presents The Witch with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.66:1 aspect ratio.  Excellently preserved, skin tones are sharply detailed while the somber tones of overcast skies are handsomely demonstrated.  In addition, the earth shades found in the film’s setting and period based wardrobe display appreciative sense of textures and fibers with black levels appearing perfectly inky.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is solidly audible, if not occasionally hard to understand due to the strong accents of the performers while Composer Mark Korven’s (Cube) frightening score makes powerfully effective declarations.  Special features include, an Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Robert Eggers, The Witch: A Primal Folktale (8:28) featuring interviews with Eggers and his cast, a Salem Panel Q&A with Cast and Crew (27:59) plus, a Design Gallery (17 in total).  Finally, Trailers (10:46) for Green Room, The Adderall Diaries, Mojave, Tusk and Ex Machina are included along with a Digital HD Code.  Weaving its own spell on viewers with its hyper realistic foundation and disturbing injections of horror, The Witch takes its time establishing its folktale, equally serving and harming its narrative.  Regardless of its carefully calculated narrative, The Witch is a marvelous directorial debut, ripe for multiple viewings to fully appreciate the capturing of its bygone period.  Furthermore, Lionsgate’s high-definition release excels in its technical areas while its assortment of special features are few yet offer a sizable amount of detail into the film’s making.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available May 17th from Lionsgate, The Witch can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Crimson Peak (2015) Blu-ray Review

    Crimson Peak (2015)

    Director: Guillermo del Toro

    Starring: Mia Wasikowska, Tom Hiddleston, Jessica Chastain & Charlie Hunnam

    Released by: Universal Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From the acclaimed director of Pan’s Labyrinth, Crimson Peak centers on Edith Cushing (Mia Wasikowska, Stoker) who after suffering a personal tragedy, falls head over heels for the seductive Thomas Sharpe (Tom Hiddleston, The Avengers).  Whisked away to his dilapidated mansion, Edith encounters mysteries and spirits within her new home revolving around her newfound love and the darkest of truths.  Jessica Chastain (The Martian) and Charlie Hunnam (Pacific Rim) co-star.

    Honoring such classics as The Haunting and The Innocents, Director Guillermo del Toro’s love letter to Gothic Romances and chilling ghost tales is as visually ravishing as it is tragically compelling.  Co-written by Brian Robbins (Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark),  Crimson Peak, taking place in the late 19th century, follows independent spirit Edith Cushing (Wasikowska) as she attempts to get her novel published despite her gender.  Juggling responsibilities at her father’s respected business, Edith encounters the dashingly handsome Sir Thomas Sharpe (Hiddleston) as he attempts to gain investments from Mr. Cushing on his unproven clay-mining invention.  Unimpressed by the privileged baronet and his suspicious sister Lucille (Chastain), Mr. Cushing discovers unsavory details about the siblings, demanding them to return to their homeland despite Thomas’ expressed love for his daughter.  Suffering a heartbreaking tragedy and with no other family remaining, Edith and Thomas are joined together in Holy matrimony before relocating back to the Sharpe’s English mansion.  Haunted by ghostly apparitions and progressively growing more ill, Edith uncovers the house’s darkest secrets while fearing for her life from those now considered loved ones.  Equally concerned for her well-being, longtime friend Dr. Alan McMichael (Hunnam) travels to the imposing Allerdale Hall for a terrifying discovery, one that he and Edith may not survive.

    Dripping with potent atmosphere and unafraid to shock audiences with grizzly imagery despite its classy appearance, Crimson Peak is an exceptional tour de force of gothic cinema.  Empowered by del Toro’s flawless visual touches, the auteur’s haunting romance makes dazzling statements through its rich production design and spot-on wardrobe choices, both of which were astoundingly ignored by the Academy.  Excellently casted, the innocence of Wasikowska, Chastain’s unhinged demeanor and the conflicted emotional state of Hiddleston greatly impress while, the Sharpe’s questionable correlation and eventual reveal sends the film down even darker hallways than anticipated.  Combining onset performers with effective uses of CGI, the film’s predominately blood red ghosts are genuinely frightening with a particular specter paying homage to del Toro’s own The Devil’s Backbone.  Although making modest strides at the box-office and graciously appreciated by critics, Crimson Peak is a beautifully haunting masterpiece that impressively ranks as del Toro’s finest effort to date.

    Universal Studios Home Entertainment presents Crimson Peak with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Relaying skin tones with natural ease and well-defined detail, the dreary location of Allerdale Hall and its various lighting choices ranging from reds to blues, are effectively highlighted.  Costume choices, realized by newcomer Kate Hawely (Edge of Tomorrow), read beautifully with various stitching methods and textures easily seen and better appreciated.  Doused in considerable darkness, black levels are quite exquisite in the shadowy halls of the haunted house and Thomas’ jet black attire with no evidence of crushing on display.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is always audible while, quieter ghostly ambiance, rainy wailing winds and Fernando Velázquez’s (The Orphanage, Mama) frightful music queues never disappointing.  Special feature include, an enthralling Audio Commentary with Co-Writer/Director Guillermo del Toro, Deleted Scenes (4:26), I Remember Crimson Peak (Blu-ray exclusive), a four part featurette consisting of The Gothic Corridor (4:06), The Scullery (4:24), The Red Clay Mines (5:18) and The Limbo Fog Set (5:42) all of which host interviews with del Toro and his remarkable cast.  In addition, A Primer on Gothic Romance (Blu-ray exclusive) (5:36) traces the roots of the genre with the interviewees using their own feature as a springboard, The Light and Dark of Crimson Peak (7:53) spotlights the film’s impressive production design, Hand Tailored Gothic (8:58) (Blu-ray exclusive) details Costume Designer Kate Hawley’s gorgeous contributions, A Living Thing (12:11) (Blu-ray exclusive) explores the artistic efforts designing the haunted Allerdale Hall, Beware of Crimson Peak (7:51) finds Thomas Hiddleston acting as tour guide on a walkthrough of the house and Crimson Phantoms (7:02) (Blu-ray exclusive) takes a look at the film’s unique approaches to its many specters.  Finally, a DVD edition and Digital HD Code are also included.

    A personal favorite of last year’s theatrical releases and arguably del Toro’s finest achievement yet, Crimson Peak presents an unforgettably haunting experience, respecting the Gothic romances that came before while, delivering a distinct visual feast firmly rooted in the imagination of its maker.  As gorgeously realized as its feature, Universal Studios Home Entertainment delivers an outstanding high-def presentation with a stimulating selection of special features for those who dare to take an extended stay at Allerdale Hall.

    RATING: 5/5

    Available now from Universal Studios Home Entertainment, Crimson Peak can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Haunter (2013) Blu-ray Review


    Haunter (2013)
    Director: Vincenzo Natali
    Starring: Abigail Breslin, Stephen McHattie, Michelle Nolden & Peter Outerbridge
    Released by: IFC Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    With the runaway success of the Paranormal Activity franchise and most recently, The Conjuring, stories of the supernatural and ghosts are all the rage.  Whether it’s a house or a doll, hauntings have always managed to delight and terrify audiences for decades.  Aiming for originality, the concept of a ghost haunting a fellow ghost seems fresh in a climate of mediocrity.  Director Vincenzo Natali (Cube, Splice) invites viewers to witness a young, suffering ghost attempting to save a living soul from a deadly fate.  Does this unique spin on ghost tales have what it takes to send you chills?  Let’s find out...  

    Haunter stars Abigail Breslin (Little Miss Sunshine, Zombieland) as Lisa, a 15-year-old girl living with her family in 1985.  Tragically, Lisa and her family died under unusual circumstances leaving their spirits to unknowingly follow the same routine.  Lisa discovers a way to reach out to the world of the living in order to help Olivia, the young girl currently residing in Lisa’s house, from a deadly fate similar to her own.  Unique and shocking, Haunter co-stars Stephen McHattie (Watchmen), Michelle Nolden (Red) and Peter Outerbridge (Lucky Number Slevin).

    MOVIE:
    Admittedly, films set in the 1980s normally cast a nostalgic spell for those enamored with the days of Devo and Pac-Man.  Engaging the audience with subtleties, opposed to painfully obvious reminders allows for the spirit of the era to take over.  Unfortunately, Haunter breaks this cardinal rule immediately.  Reminding the viewer that this is 1985 at every turn is beyond distracting.  Lisa’s (Breslin) room is covered with Depeche Mode and David Bowie posters, her little brother Robbie (Peter DaCunha) spends most of his time playing Pac-Man and Lisa’s family unwinds by watching Murder, She Wrote.  The worst offense is when Lisa is called to the table to talk with her parents as she toys with a Rubik’s Cube.  The constant attempts to reaffirm the time period fails to engage the viewer but reminds us that we are in fact watching a film.  In addition, Lisa goes about her normal daily routine until she begins to notice a similar pattern.  The audience spends the first 30 minutes of the film subjected to Lisa’s Groundhog Day-like awareness that continuously treads the same water.  This routine quickly becomes tiresome as the story bites its time trying to develop a narrative.  Finally, Lisa begins hearing voices and makes attempts to communicate with the living world.  A sinister, ghostly pale man (Stephen McHattie) warns Lisa about the voices and advises her to continue her routine.  Of course, Lisa, with Siouxsie and the Banshees shirt in tow, rebels against the fellow ghost and connects with Olivia, the young teenage girl presently residing in Lisa’s house.  Through investigation, Lisa learns that countless girls that previously resided in her house disappeared and were never heard from again.  It becomes clear that The Pale Man formally lived in the house and has developed a bratty jealousy about anyone else residing there.  In hopes of her family reaching peace, Lisa defies the odds and plans to help Olivia before The Pale Man makes her his next victim.

    Haunter presents a unique concept but fails every step of the way in telling a frightening or mildly interesting tale.  Abigail Breslin, who shines in nearly every film she appears in, looks dreadfully bored here.  In addition, the far from polished screenplay casts a dark cloud of uncertainty on what the makers of the film were attempting to accomplish.  The sad 1980s referential moments only remove the viewer from the experience and highlight the laziness of tone setting.  Most importantly, Haunter fails to pack any sense of frights or suspense in a tale about ghosts haunting ghosts.  Director Vincenzo Natali has shown immense promise with his previous efforts, but unfortunately Haunter is a major step back.  In what sounded intriguing, Haunter is an unstructured and sad take on the supernatural and hauntings.
    RATING: 1/5

    VIDEO:
    IFC Films presents Haunter in a 1080p anamorphic widescreen (1.85:1) transfer.  While, the film fails to deliver, its transfer doesn’t bode so well either.  The 1980s time period is cast in a softer light with Lisa’s house constantly engulfed in fog giving the film a hazier, less than appealing look.  In addition, as Lisa investigates her basement and other dark areas, black levels are often muddy leaving much to be desired.  Detail appears decently sharp in wardrobe but not as on par with other films shot in 2013.  The softer appearance and bleak black levels may have been intended, but it hardly translates to a stellar transfer.
    RATING: 3/5

    AUDIO:
    Haunter comes equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix that fares better than its video presentation.  Dialogue comes across with no issues while hisses and pops remain extinct.  Attempts at jump scares push the sound nicely but the mix does little to overly impress.  In addition, a 2.0 PCM lossless mix is also included.
    RATING: 3.5/5

    EXTRAS:

    - Audio Commentary with Director Vincenzo Natali

    - Audio Commentary with Writer Brian King

    - Behind the Scenes: Lasting over 20 minutes, this fluff piece finds the cast and crew tooting their own horns about the film and what drew them to the project.  Interesting bits include Breslin explaining that the concept of a ghost being haunted by someone living was appealing.  Perhaps, she was reading another script or the story confused even her.  In addition, Director Vincenzo Natali explains how not directing a film for a few years causes you to forget how.  A sad statement that speaks volumes here.  

    - Haunter - The Complete Storyboard by Vincenzo Natali: Natali’s storyboard script plays as a motion slideshow lasting nearly an hour.

    - Teaser Poster

    - Trailer

    RATING: 3.5/5

    OVERALL:
    Haunter is a horrendously dull and never terrifying execution in ghosts and the supernatural world.  The creative combination of Natali and Breslin should have made this film a unique exploration of ghosts haunting their own kind but sadly, Haunter never finds its footing.  The messy screenplay and embarrassing attempts at casting a 1980s atmosphere will find the viewer shaking their head in disapproval.  IFC Films’ video presentation is nothing to write home about, while the audio mix is sufficient enough.  The special features are in decent amount, but the quality of the film fail to make them very intriguing.  Haunter could have been much more had proper focus been paid to the screenplay and pacing, but unfortunately, the final result is a disappointing one.
    RATING: 2.5/5