Blu-ray/DVD Reviews

Category

Currently showing posts tagged Pixar

  • Cars 3 (2017) Blu-ray Review

    Cars 3 (2017)

    Director: Brian Fee

    Starring: Owen Wilson, Cristela Alonzo, Chris Cooper, Nathan Fillion, Larry the Cable Guy, Armie Hammer, Bonnie Hunt & Kerry Washington

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Riding high as renowned champion for years, Cars 3 finds racing legend Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson, Midnight in Paris) being pushed out of the limelight by a new generation of hotshot racers.  Recognizing times are a-changin’, McQueen teams with an enthusiastic trainer, Cruz Ramirez (Cristela Alonzo, Cristela), to prove he still has what it takes to go the distance.

    Reverting back to the bluegrass roots of its originator, Cars 3 comes full circle as Lightning McQueen, the once arrogant rookie turned lovable champ, becomes the aging pro to face his biggest and most emotional challenge yet.  Continuing to enjoy a successful winning streak and unanimous respect amongst his peers, McQueen and others of his breed are quickly sideswiped by a new crop of determined and technologically superior vehicles with their eyes on racing glory.  Rattled by the speed and cockiness of his new foe, Jackson Storm (Armie Hammer, The Lone Ranger), and the retirements of longtime pals, McQueen begins to feel his time may also be up after suffering a near fatal wreck.  Recovering in Radiator Springs and longing for guidance from his late mentor Doc Hudson, McQueen’s spirits are lifted by his Route 66 family and his determination renewed by new Rust-eze owner, Sterling (Nathan Fillion, Castle).  Teamed with spunky motivational trainer Cruz Ramirez, McQueen, through soul-searching and additional support from Doc Hudson’s mentor Smokey (Chris Cooper, The Muppets), navigates his way through the evolving world of racing while learning to see a future beyond just his own career.  

    Ditching the sillier espionage hijinks of its predecessor, Cars 3 is a leaps and bounds improvement, reverting the spotlight back onto Lightning McQueen in a tale that resonates with an aging audience who have grown much since happening upon Radiator Springs a decade ago.  While humor is in noticeably shorter supply with franchise mainstays such as, McQueen bestie Mater (Larry the Cable Guy, Jingle All the Way 2) surprisingly regulated to background decoration, the third installment recaptures the small-town charms and big city dreams that was sorely lacking in its internationally sprawling and mindlessly mundane sequel.  Taking over directorial duties from John Lasseter, longtime Pixar storyboard artist Brian Fee (Cars, WALL-E) paints a picturesque installment with photorealistic animation including, the most devastatingly heart wrenching sequence of the series and a tender core that reaffirms audiences deep-rooted love for these chatty cars.  Incorporating flashback sequences and previously recorded dialogue from Paul Newman as the Fabulous Hudson Hornet, Cars 3 is a lightning fast return to form for the series that, in its presumable last lap, whizzes past the finishing line as the best effort since its 2006 debut.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Cars 3 with a pristine 1080p transfer, fitted in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio.  Sparkling from start to finish, the wide spectrum of unique car colors burst off the screen while finer details appearing in rust and asphalt boast equal levels of crisp quality.  Matching its glorious high-definition picture, the DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 excels during high-speed races and heart-pounding wrecks with dialogue exchanges rightly prioritized for ideal listening.  Sprawled across two discs, special features on Disc 1 include, an in-depth Audio Commentary with Director Brian Fee, Co-Producer Andrea Warren and Creative Director Jay Ward, Lou (6:43), Pixar’s latest short film about a schoolyard’s magical lost-and-found bin and Miss Fritter’s Racing Sckoool (5:40), an exclusive new mini-movie/commercial attracting cars on how to get their mojo back.  Furthermore, Ready for the Race (5:40) sits down with actual race car driver William Byron on his passion for the sport and Cruz Ramirez: The Yellow Car That Could (7:46) takes a deeper look into the evolution and vocal talent attached to Lightning McQueen’s new coach.  Lastly, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Descendants 2 (0:32), Dolphins (1:16), Coco (1:37), Olaf’s Frozen Adventure (1:34) and The Walt Disney Signature Collection (1:33) are also provided.  

    Meanwhile, Disc 2 kicks off with an extensive five-part Behind the Scenes featurette including, Generations: The Story of Cars 3 (11:20), Let’s. Get. Crazy (7:41), Cars to Die(cast) For (5:21), Legendary (11:22) and World’s Fastest Billboard (5:30) that explores the film’s tricky development, new and returning characters, the making of the toys based on the film and the many logos and faux brands implemented in the sequel.  Furthermore, Fly Throughs puts viewers in the driver seat for some of the film’s digital environments including, Thomasville (1:10), Florida International Speedway (0:37) and Rust-Eze Racing Center (0:56).  My First Car finds cast and crew participants discussing their very own first ride in A Green Car on the Red Carpet with Kerry Washington (1:53), Old Blue (1:21) and Still in the Family (2:16).  Also included, Deleted Scenes (26:17) with optional director introduction, Trailers featuring Crash - North American Teaser (0:56), Icon - North American Trailer (2:33), Theatrical Payoff - Japan Trailer (2:02), All New - International Teaser (0:31) and Rivalry - Global Trailer (2:10).  Finally, Promos for Cars D’Oeuvres (4:27) and Cars Reveals spotlighting the characters of Lightning McQueen (0:39), Cruz Ramirez (0:41) and Jackson Storm (0:39) close out the on-disc supplemental content while a DVD edition and Digital HD Code are also included.

    Speeding onto home video as Pixar’s next anticipated effort lights up theaters, Cars 3 is a true return to form for the franchise once thought to be left in the dust.  An endearing tale about the trials of aging gracefully, Lightning McQueen’s last lap is one that sends viewers off into the sunset with warm memories of the residents of Radiator Springs.  Unsurprisingly, Disney has once again ensured an extravagant audio and visual presentation while its bonus content covers considerable ground for fans of behind the scenes happenings.  

    RATING: 4/5

    Available November 7th from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Cars 3 can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Finding Dory (2016) Blu-ray Review

    Finding Dory (2016)

    Director(s): Andrew Stanton & Angus MacLane

    Starring: Ellen DeGeneres, Albert Brooks, Ed O’Neill, Kaitlin Olson, Hayden Rolence, Ty Burrell, Diane Keaton, Eugene Levy, Idris Elba & Dominic West

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Returning to the undersea world of the 2003 hit movie, Finding Dory focuses on the loveably forgetful blue tang (Ellen DeGeneres, Ellen) as memories of her family slowly resurface, inspiring a new quest to find them.  Assisted by a wave of new sea creatures, Dory’s journey won’t be simple but, one of unforgettable adventure.  

    In its long overdue followup, Finding Dory shifts its attention to the fan-favorite costar of the original with her role as the seeker now substituted as the lost traveller in her pursuit for her family.  Treading familiar waters with a less epic journey ahead, Finding Dory’s routine calculations are thankfully offset by DeGeneres’ charisma and the film’s hilarious new supporting players.  A year after reuniting Nemo (Hayden Rolence) with his father Marlin (Albert Brooks, Drive), Dory is struck with memory flashes of the parents (Diane Keaton, Annie Hall and Eugene Levy, American Pie) she became separated from as a child.  With assistance from the bodaciouslly cool sea turtle Crush, Dory, Marlin and Nemo find themselves at the Marine Life Institute in California where the blue tang is certain she resided with her loved ones.  Before long, Dory is separated from her clownfish pals by marine biologists and forced to navigate the interiors of the aquatic development on her own.  Luckily encountering Hank (Ed O’Neill, Modern Family), a particularly crabby octopus with desires of living his days solely in an aquarium, the two find mutual benefits in sticking together while, meeting hilariously lazy sea lions Fluke and Rudder (Idris Elba, The Jungle Book and Dominic West, John Carter respectively), a near-sighted whale shark named Destiny (Kaitlin Olson, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia) and a bulbous beluga whale known as Bailey (Ty Burrell, Muppets Most Wanted).

    Warming hearts with flashbacks of an adorably young Dory and rescuing her best friends from a permeant stay in Cleveland during a high-speed truck pursuit, Finding Dory never stumbles in relaying saccharine charm yet, its narrative plays itself too safely that although entertaining, halts the sequel from exceeding the quality of its original.  With Dory and Hank’s at first contentious turned sweet friendship being the film’s finest asset along with its stunning visuals, Finding Dory may not be the next Pixar masterpiece but, remains a throughly fun ride, no matter how simple-minded its journey is.  

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Finding Dory with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Nothing short of perfection, the oceanic environment from the murky, dimly lit depths of the sea to the colorful shades of blue in the waters of the film’s California setting shine beautifully with strong presence and exacting detail.  Furthermore, the bolder hues found in characters such as Hank, Nemo and Dory pop exceptionally while, black levels never falter in relaying the inkiest of depths.  Disney once again has made a high-definition splash viewers will find the utmost delight in.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is crystal clear with the splashing of waves, bubbling ambiance and the film’s lovely musical score all presented with effective priority.  Featuring well over two hours of additional content, Disc 1’s special features include, an Audio Commentary with Directors Andrew Stanton & Angus MacLane and Producer Lindsey Collins, Piper (6:05), Pixar’s latest short subject revolving around a baby sandpiper coping with his fear of water, Marine Life Interviews (2:04) featuring humorous sit-downs with the supporting sea creatures about their encounters with Dory, The Octopus That Nearly Broke Pixar (9:05) deals with the complexities of bringing the tentacled character of Hank to life and What Were We Talking About? (4:31) finds the creative team discussing the titular character and the trickiness of her short-term memory loss.  In addition, Casual Carpool (3:47) finds Director Andrew Stanton chauffeuring Stars Albert Brooks, Ty Burrell, Eugene Levy and eventually Ed O’Neill as they hilariously fail to discuss fish facts, Animation & Acting (6:57) explores the art of voice acting with the cast and creators while, Deep in the Kelp (3:20) finds Jenna Ortega of Stuck in the Middle hosting a look into Pixar’s oceanic research developing the film and Creature Features (3:02) catches up with the cast as they share tidbits on their real undersea counterparts.  Lastly, Sneak Peeks for Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Elena of Avalor (0:32), Disney Store (0:32), Disney on Ice (1:02), Moana (1:26) and 2017’s Beauty and the Beast (1:37) round out the supplemental smorgasbord.

    Next up on Disc 2, bonus content includes, a Behind the Scenes section of several featurettes covering Skating & Sketching with Jason Deamer (4:14), Dory’s Theme (4:57), Rough Day on the Reef (1:11), Finding Nemo As Told by Emoji (2:47) and Fish Schticks (3:35).  Secondly, a selection of bonfire-like ambiance for your television screen featuring unique Living Aquariums are included such as, Sea Grass (3:03:52), Open Ocean (2:48:30), Stingrays (2:48:42) and Swim to the Surface (1:02:20).  Finally, Deleted Scenes (50:15), Trailers ranging from the Sleep Swimming United States Trailer (1:43), Theatrical Payoff Japan Trailer (2:09), Can’t Remember Spain Trailer (1:22) and the Journey Russia Trailer (2:31) are included alongside a DVD edition of the release and a Digital HD Code.

    Over a decade since Finding Nemo swam its way into the hearts of audiences worldwide, its belated sequel may have arrived with open arms but, strays too closely to formula to be considered as impactful.  While its dynamics may seem wholly familiar, the returning characters make for delightful company with the hilarious supporting players being responsible for the better part of the film’s laughs.  Falling short of the greatness of Pixar’s Toy Story sequels, Finding Dory keeps its agenda simple and breezy with depths of fun still to be had for audiences who can’t stop swimming for these beloved characters.  Meanwhile, Disney admirably stretches its tentacles to deliver another first-rate high-definition release with hours worth of bonus content to keep viewers drenched in entertainment.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available November 15th from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Finding Dory can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers. 

  • The Good Dinosaur (2015) Blu-ray Review

    The Good Dinosaur (2015)

    Director: Peter Sohn

    Starring: Raymond Ochoa, Jack Bright, Sam Elliot, Anna Paquin, A.J. Buckley, Jeffrey Wright, Frances McDormand & Steve Zahn

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set in an alternate timeline where the astroid that forever altered life on Earth missed, The Good Dinosaur centers on scaredy cat apatosaurus Arlo (Raymond Ochoa, Mars Needs Moms) who after suffering a personal tragedy is lost in the far reaches of the wilderness.  Joined by an unlikely companion in rambunctious cave boy Spot (newcomer Jack Bright), Arlo must confront his deepest fears while journeying back to his family.  Sam Elliot (Grandma), Anna Paquin (X-Men: Days of Future Past), A.J. Buckley (CSI: NY), Jeffrey Wright (Casino Royale), Frances McDormand (Fargo) and Steve Zahn (Diary of a Wimpy Kid) comprise the film’s additional vocal talent.

    Plagued with directorial switches, story overhauls and cast changes, The Good Dinosaur, Pixar’s second feature of 2015 following the universally loved Inside Out, found itself against near-insurmountable odds and a ticking clock to adhere to the expected quality of past Pixar productions.  Admittedly possessing themes familiar from past efforts, The Good Dinosaur’s coming-of-age tale of soul searching and fear facing still packs the emotional mark audiences have come to rely on with Pixar’s narrative whimsy.  Following the loss of his father, undersized apatosaurus Arlo is whisked away by nature’s ferocious elements, far away from the farm he calls home.  Alone and fearing for his life, Arlo, much to his initial dismay, finds himself in the company of the nonverbal cave boy Spot, leading the two to become co-travelers.  Spot’s unwavering loyalty and fearlessness to protect his new friend opens Arlo’s eyes to a new understanding and acceptance on their long journey home.  Withstanding dangerous weather conditions, Arlo and Spot find themselves in the good graces of a trio of T-rex as they battle velociraptors to protect their herd of longhorn.  With his confidence boosted and spirits raised, Arlo and his human companion face greater struggles when carnivorous pterodactyls capture Spot to quench their appetite.  Inspired by the spirit of his Poppa (Wright), Arlo will stop at nothing to rescue his best friend and return home to his mother and siblings.

    While perhaps lacking the originality audiences have come to expect annually from the animation studio, The Good Dinosaur is unquestionably Pixar’s most stunning looking production to date with its photorealistic environments setting a new standard high.  In addition, the heartwarming friendship and adventures shared between Arlo and Spot are equally as emotional and thrilling as anything Pixar has achieved before.  Furthermore, humor is plentiful as Arlo’s fear of critters is demonstrated while, the two companions’ psychedelic trip after feasting on unusual berries boasts bizzaro animation and absurd facial features of the characters.  Although slightly off-color during initial viewings, the sequence grows funnier with repeated watches.  In their first year producing two features, Pixar’s The Good Dinosaur may have had difficulty following its other “emotional” picture while, its own narrative arguably lacks pizzazz.  That said, Arlo’s journey of self discovery matched with the film’s awe-inspiring animation makes The Good Dinosaur Pixar’s greatest underdog that will leave viewers teary-eyed several times over.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents The Good Dinosaur with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.39:1 aspect ratio.  Set in impressive photo-real environments where greenery, blue skies and mountain vistas appear natural and richly detailed, Pixar’s prehistoric feature is nothing short of breathtaking.  In addition, bolder colors found in Arlo’s green skin, the reddish textures of his T-rex friends and the illuminating glow of fireflies pop magnificently while, the shadows of the night skies boast perfectly inky black levels.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is consummately relayed while, Jeff (The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus) and Mychael (Life of Pi) Danna’s earthy, bluegrass score is beautifully balanced.  Furthermore, the ambiance of the wilderness and the capturing of splashing waves and thunderous rainstorms offer great effectiveness.  Special features include, an Audio Commentary with Director Peter Sohn, Story Supervisor Kelsey Mann, Animation Supervisor Mike Venturini, Director of Photography and Lighting Sharon Calahan & Supervising Technical Director Sanjay Bakshi.  Also included, Sanjay’s Super Team (7:07), Pixar’s latest Academy Award nominated short from Sanjay Patel, True Lies About Dinosaurs (1:56) where humorous notes are made regarding the film’s fictional liberties, Recyclosaurus (6:19) showcases Pixar employees as they embark on a competition to fashion dinosaurs with left over goods, The Filmmakers’ Journey (7:54) is a brief yet, effective look into the making of the production from first time director Sohn.  Furthermore, Every Part of the Dinosaur (6:08) details the visual development of the film’s dinos, Following the T-Rex Trail (6:58) showcases the filmmakers studying a cattle ranch for research purposes, Deleted Scenes (10:41), Dino Bites (4:15), Hide and Seek (0:59) and Trailers for Moment: North American Trailer 2 (2:25), Courage: Russian Trailer (2:30) and Different: German Trailer (2:03) are also available.  Finally, Sneak Peeks at the state of Wyoming (3:41), Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Disney Parks (0:32), Disney Store (0:32), Finding Dory (1:43) and Zootopia (1:38) round out the supplements with a DVD edition of the release and a Digital HD Code also included.

    Although casting familiar narrative shades from other Pixar features, The Good Dinosaur still manages to pack ample emotion with its grandiose animation leading the pack as the studio’s most gorgeous achievement yet.  Faced with many production obstacles, Pixar’s latest may not have resonated immediately with audiences yet, demands praise for its beauty and heartwarming friendship between its lovable leads.  Meanwhile, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents The Good Dinosaur with high-definition perfection and a generous spread of supplements including, an informative commentary, Pixar’s latest short film and several other making-of featurettes.  

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available February 23rd from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, The Good Dinosaur can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Inside Out 3D Ultimate Collector's Edition (2015) Blu-ray Review

    Inside Out (2015)

    Director: Pete Docter

    Starring: Amy Poehler, Phyllis Smith, Bill Hader, Lewis Black & Mindy Kaling

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From the director of Monsters Inc. and Up, Inside Out travels into the mind of 11-year-old Riley as she emotionally processes her move to a new city.  With the optimistic Joy (Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation) and her fellow emotions Sadness (Phyllis Smith, The Office), Fear (Bill Hader, Trainwreck), Anger (Lewis Black, The Daily Show) and Disgust (Mindy Kaling, The Mindy Project), the contrasting quintet brace themselves for an adventure of self discovery.  Richard Kind (Spin City), Diane Lane (Secretariat) and Kyle MacLachlan (Twin Peaks) provide additional vocal talent.

    Breaking new ground in the form of animated storytelling, Inside Out takes viewers on an ingenious journey through the inner workings of an emotionally evolving young girl.  Abruptly whisked away from her idyllic home in Minnesota to the unfamiliar San Francisco, Riley’s once happy existence is traumatically challenged.  Processing the life-changing events are Riley’s gamut of emotions Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger and Disgust as the colorful characters strive to stabilize Riley’s rocky feelings.  Determined to right the ship, Joy and her fellow cohorts find themselves overwhelmed by the always gloomy Sadness as their control center begins rapidly changing with Riley’s increasing unhappiness.  As chaos ensues and previously happy memories are compromised, Joy’s frantic attempts at repair results in her and Sadness transplanted to the complex dwellings of Riley’s long-term memories.  While the remaining emotions only cause Riley to grow more distant from her parents, Joy and Sadness navigate the labyrinth of her subconscious and encounter imaginative characters while, learning invaluable information about their feelings in order for Riley to be whole once again.

    Complimented by a perfectly selected voice cast, Inside Out gives life to the ever-changing quirks that make us tick with knee-slapping humor and immense heart.  From Fear’s hilariously paranoid personality and Anger’s constant desire to curse to the film’s wickedly smart explanations behind our ability to retain selected memories, Inside Out explores the bowels of the human psyche unlike any film before.  Simultaneously absorbing Riley’s personal journey and her emotions own epic misadventure, audiences’ hearts are consistently tugged between characters they care the world for.  Following Joy and Sadnesses encounter with Riley’s former imaginary friend Bing Bong (Kind) and his selfless fate, viewers will be unquestionably left teary-eyed.  Remarkably constructed and emotionally captivating, Director Pete Docter’s imaginative investigation of our feelings is a visual triumph and the latest in Pixar’s modern day masterpieces.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Inside Out with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Capturing the boldly defined colors of its emotional characters and their sprawling control center, picture quality is immaculate.  Detail found in the illuminating glow of Joy and the lightly fuzzy skin of her co-stars is astounding while, black levels, most appreciatively during Joy and Bing Bong’s escape from the Memory Dump, are deeply inky and free of any crushing artifacts.  Echoing the high standards of previously released Pixar productions, Inside Out look flawless.  In addition, its 3D counterpart located on Disc 2 is beautifully immersive, inviting viewers into its unique world with remarkable depth easily making it one of the year’s finest examples of 3D entertainment.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is excellently prioritized with strong fidelity throughout.  The delicate key strokes of Composer Michael Giacchino’s score are beautifully relayed while, the crumbling sounds of Riley’s personality islands maintain a thunderous presence resulting in a universally applauded mix.  Special features located on Disc 1 include, an Audio Commentary with Director Pete Docter & Co-Director Ronnie Del Carmen, Lava (7:12), Director James Ford Murphy’s short film about a lovesick volcano that preceded Inside Out theatrically looks lovely and contains a hauntingly beautiful ukulele tune but, lacks the memorability of past shorts.  In addition, the all-new short Riley’s First Date? (4:40) finds Inside Out’s human star embarking on possibly her first date much to the uneasiness of her father who hysterically bonds with her date over AC/DC.  Also included, Path to Pixar: The Women of Inside Out (11:22) is an inspirational look at the female artists and voice talent who share their childhood ambitions and sage advice with viewers.  Finally, Mixed Emotions (7:17) focuses on the intensive research developing the film’s emotional characters and their appearances while, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Disney: Infinity 3.0, Aulani - Disney Resort & Spa (0:32), Disney Movies Anywhere (0:40), The Good Dinosaur (1:14), Toy Story That Time Forgot (0:59) and Tomorrowland (0:50) round out the disc’s supplements.  

    Additionally, more special features located on Disc 3 include, a multi-part Behind the Scenes series comprised of Story of the Story (10:30), Mapping the Mind (8:24), Our Dad, the Filmmakers (7:25), Into the Unknown: The Sound of Inside Out (7:09), The Misunderstood Art of Animation Film Editing (4:43) and Mind Candy (14:26).  Furthermore, Deleted Scenes (16:53), Trailers for Remember (1:38), Experience (2:19) and the Japan Trailer (2:30) can also be found with a DVD edition and Digital HD Code rounding out the remaining extras.

    Following their timeless classics of talking toys and virtually speechless robots, Inside Out joins the ranks of Pixar’s most endearing and deeply original concepts.  Starring and conjuring a variety of emotions for viewers, Director Pete Docter’s most daring effort to date is a masterful accomplishment that blends imagination and heart effortlessly.  Exceptionally presented, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment delivers Inside Out with pristine technical grades, top-quality 3D and a handsome dose of additional bonus content.  Distinct and powerfully moving, Inside Out is the animated gem of the year!

    RATING: 5/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Inside Out can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Toy Story That Time Forgot (2014) Blu-ray Review

    Toy Story That Time Forgot (2014)

    Director: Steve Purcell

    Starring: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Kristen Schaal, Kevin McKidd, Wallace Shawn & Emily Hahn

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    During a post-Christmas playdate, Toy Story That Time Forgot finds Bonnie’s toys in a prehistoric predicament when they encounter the hilariously delusional Battlesaurs action figure line.  Entangled in gladiator-like battles and their safe return to Bonnie’s room looking grim, Trixie the triceratops is the gang’s only hope at survival.  Tom Hanks (Forrest Gump), Tim Allen (Last Man Standing), Kristen Schaal (Bob’s Burgers), Kevin McKidd (Brave), Wallace Shawn (Clueless) and Emily Hahn (Toy Story 3) provide the vocal talent.  

    Debuting on ABC as a holiday-themed television special, Toy Story That Time Forgot finds Pixar’s finest, Woody (Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Allen), Rex (Shawn) and Toy Story 3’s Trixie (Schaal) in a land like no other during Bonnie’s playdate.  Surrounded by the deadly serious Battlesaurs action figure line, the gang are originally embraced by their fellow toys with Trixie taking a particular liking to the leader of the pack Reptillus Maximus (McKidd).  Before long, Trixie and Rex are equipped with battle-mode enhancements and forced to combat with their own friends to prove their loyalty to their fellow dinos.  While fan favorites Woody and Buzz take a noticeable backseat in this latest adventure, Toy Story That Time Forgot gives the adorably bubbly Trixie her time to shine as the heroine of the tale.  Introducing Reptillus and his fellow Battlesaurs to their awareness as toys, Trixie, along with an equally cute Angel Kitty ornament, reverses their apocalyptic way of thinking to allow joy into their hearts.  Excellently conceived, the Battlesaurs and their epic dwellings fit in wonderfully with the Toy Story gang while, Reptillus Maximus’ attraction to Trixie is heartwarmingly sweet.  Although visually stunning, Toy Story That Time Forgot feels too familiar to Buzz Lightyear’s own delusions in the original film to appear wholly unique.  Admittedly not as memorable as their Halloween-themed outing, 2013’s Toy Story of Terror!, Toy Story That Time Forgot still entertains and generously adds to the beloved characters enduring appearances.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Toy Story That Time Forgot with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Astoundingly crisp and vibrant, bright colors found in the toys’ outfits and the deep reds of the Battlesaurs make an impactful presence.  In addition, detail is immaculate with chipped paint in Trixie’s plastic and the various joints of the many prehistoric warriors appearing most clearly.  Awarded the same care as Pixar’s theatrical efforts, Toy Story That Time Forgot looks magnificent.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is always audible while, Composer Michael Giacchino’s (Tomorrowland, Inside Out) score greatly impresses.  More forceful moments of action give a splendid rise to the mix with Rex’s powerful stomps providing effective bass sounds.  Meanwhile, special features include, an Audio Commentary with Director Steve Purcell & Head of Story Derek Thompson, Reptillus! (10:51) finds many of the artists discussing the extensive background of the Battlesaurs, their visual development and the vocal recording sessions for their head dinosaur.  In addition, Toy Story Goes to Comic-Con (3:39), Karaoke: “My Unexpected Friend” (3:59) with Reptillus Sings/You Sing options, Battlesaurs - Animated Opening (0:50) and Deleted Scenes (9:25) with intros by Director Steve Purcell are also included.  Finally, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), The Good Dinosaur (1:14) and Inside Out (1:27) are joined by a Digital HD Code.

    Warming the hearts of viewers with yet another television special, Toy Story That Time Forgot finds Bonnie’s more prominent toys taking a breather while, the Kristen Schaal voiced Trixie takes center stage.  Introducing the barbarically cool Battlesaurs, the gang’s latest mini adventure may not be the most original but still offers ample entertainment during its short runtime.  Unsurprisingly, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment sprinkles their pixie dust to deliver a first-rate transfer, striking sound mix and serviceable supplements.  Unlike its suggested title, Toy Story That Time Forgot is hardly forgettable and a welcome addition to everyone’s favorite toy tales.  

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Toy Story That Time Forgot can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

     

  • Adventure Planet (2012) DVD Review

    Adventure Planet (2012)

    Director: Kompin Kemgumnird

    Starring: Drake Bell, Bailee Madison, Jane Lynch, J.K. Simmons & Brooke Shields

    Released by: Arc Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    In a world overrun by endless technology and environmental carelessness, a trio of kids embark on an adventure to save it!  Set in the exotic reaches of Thailand, a tech-savvy boy scout is about to learn the beauty of nature and what must be done to ensure its safety.  From Bangkok’s Kantana Animation Studio, Arc Entertainment proudly presents Adventure Planet, an exciting tale about friendship and never underestimating the power of kids.

    Adventure Planet centers on Thailand based sister and brother, Norva (Bailee Madison, Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark) and Jorpe who have the unique abilities to communicate with nature.  After bumping into tech-obsessed boy scout and son of Capital City president, Sam (Drake Bell, Drake and Josh), during an expedition, the trios personalities clash.  With the threat of global warming at an all-time high, Sam’s gadgets fail leaving him to respect his new friends as flaming creatures descend from the skies.  The kids race to Capital City to warn the president of the planet’s energy consumption before disaster strikes everywhere.  Turning off all power on Earth in order to regenerate is the only option, as long as the three adventurous kids can convince everyone.  Jane Lynch (Wreck-It Ralph), J.K. Simmons (Juno) and Brooke Shields (The Boy Who Cried Werewolf) co-star.

    MOVIE:

    Slightly more sophisticated but not nearly as fun as an episode of Captain Planet and the Planeteers, Adventure Planet attempts to carve an adventure tale with an environmentally conscience message.  While, the awareness of nature’s safety is an important one, this Thailand-produced, computer-generated effort is far too ambitious for its own good.  Directed by Kompin Kemgumnird, who previously contributed to Disney’s Tarzan and Atlantis: The Lost Empire, Adventure Planet’s animation style feels stiff and dated compared to the highly-detailed and naturalistic quality of Dreamworks Animation and Pixar’s output.  Colors run rampant in the lush exotic landscapes with the camera respectably guided, but the characters’ dead pan, emotionless eyes offer little for the viewer to feel.  In addition, the preachy, personality clashing tale is as cliché as they come with a screenplay that is slightly overcomplicated and devoid of any humor.  Notable voice talent such as Drake Bell (Ultimate Spider-Man) and Jane Lynch (Glee) are all present and accounted for, but none offer anything memorable to this otherwise bland film.  Attempting to live up its name, Adventure Planet finds our heroes saving the day in the third act, underwhelming the viewer all the way to the end credits.

    With a tighter story and slicker animation, Adventure Planet could have been halfway decent.  Unfortunately, this independent effort bit off more than it could chew.  With the exception of a few wide shots of the Thailand vistas, Adventure Planet is not particularly well animated and suffers from a generic story that lacks excitement or a quality sense of humor.  Look elsewhere for true animated adventure.  

    RATING: 1.5/5

    VIDEO:

    Adventure Planet is presented widescreen preserving its 16:9 aspect ratio.  With colors bursting from the film, Adventure Planet tends to underwhelm in an HD dominated world where other animated films truly come alive.  Lacking superior detail or sharpness, the film looks as decent as can be with nothing notable to speak of in the transfer.  As bland as the film’s quality, the transfer matches nicely.

    RATING: 3/5

    AUDIO:

    Equipped with a Dolby Digital 5.1 mix, Adventure Planet sounds halfway decent with dialogue never encountering any issues and more climatic sequences offering a suitable increase in volume and bass.  In addition, a Dolby Digital 2.0 mix is also included.  A marginal increase over its video transfer, Adventure Planet’s mix will suffice just fine.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    EXTRAS:

    • Trailer

    • Vudu Digital Copy

    RATING: 1/5

    OVERALL:

    With a message audiences, young and old, could benefit from, Adventure Planet ultimately suffers from its stilted animation that prevents any emotional resonance for the viewer.  Furthermore, the story is uninspired and lacks much needed humor.  Arc Entertainment’s video and audio presentation is merely mediocre with only the inclusion of the film’s trailer and a Vudu digital copy code filling out the special features package.  In more capable hands, Adventure Planet could have lived up to its name of excitement and fun.  Sadly, this Bangkok-produced undertaking is best left for the recycling bin.

    RATING: 2/5