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  • Colors (1988) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    Colors (1988)

    Director: Dennis Hopper

    Starring: Sean Penn, Robert Duvall, Maria Conchita Alonso, Don Cheadle & Damon Wayans

    Released by: Shout Select

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Eye-opening at the time of its original release and unfortunately still potent in today’s divided society, Colors presents the dangerous world of gang warfare in a realistically gritty light.  Within a year’s reach of retirement, veteran L.A.P.D. officer Bob Hodges (Robert Duvall, The Godfather) is partnered with hot-headed rookie Danny McGavin (Sean Penn, Milk) in an anti-gang unit.  With clashing personalities, the two must learn to trust one another in order to survive the mayhem of Los Angeles’ South Central district.  Returning Academy Award nominee Dennis Hopper (Easy Rider) back behind the camera, Colors stages the murder of a Bloods gang member that heightens the turf war between the neighboring Crips and Barrio residing hoodlums, culminating in bullets, bloodshed and the police’s role in the center of their fatal path.  Riskily shot in the thicket of real gang territory that adds a genuine honesty to the proceedings and resulted in the actual shooting of extras during filming, Colors doesn’t flinch at the harsh realities of its crime-infested ghettos while, balancing the line of controversial good cop/bad cop approaches in protecting lawmen’s own and the community.  

    Although the casting of Penn and Duvall is inspired, their characters never fully develop as deeply as anticipated while, gang vengeance toward trigger-happy Crip member Rocket (Don Cheadle, House of Lies) takes control of the final act, leaving Hodges and McGavin’s purpose all but lost in the shuffle and shortchanging a still harrowing but, nonetheless weakened conclusion.  Featuring a chart-topping soundtrack of rap hits from such artists as, Ice-T, Big Daddy Kane and Salt-N-Pepa, Colors also costars future players Damon Wayans (Lethal Weapon) as a drug-addicted gangbanger, Tony Todd (Candyman) and Mario Lopez (Saved by the Bell) in a blink-and-you’ll-miss him role as a young thug.  An intense examination of gang life that has debatably improved over time, Colors is perhaps best recognized for its capturing of the lifestyle’s arguably darkest era and the L.A.P.D.’s equally deadly attempts to right its ship.

    Preserving its unrated cut for the first time on high-definition, Shout Select presents Colors with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Welcoming natural skin tones and lush radiance during the many sunny daytime sequences, black levels found in officer’s uniforms are deeply inky while, the drama’s filmic integrity remains firmly intact with no major anomalies to speak of.  Equipped with a strong DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is never challenged by cracks or pops while, the heavy beats of the film’s hip-hop soundtrack and jackhammering assault of bullets pulverizes onscreen action terrifically.  Carried over from Second Sight’s U.K. edition, special features include, Cry of Alarm: An Interview with Screenwriter Michael Schiffer (28:46) that shares the dangerous risks Schiffer undertook to understand the gang culture and accurately capture members’ speech patterns and slang for the script.  In addition, Cops & Robbers (16:53) hosts Technical Advisor/L.A.P.D. Gang Division Dennis Fanning on his unique career perspectives that were brought to ensure a legitimacy to the story.  Lastly, the film’s Trailer (1:53) is also included while, a hidden Easter Egg (accessed by clicking right of the Trailer in the disc’s bonus features section) offers an additional interview snippet with Screenwriter Michael Schiffer (2:16).  While the lack of supplements may fall short of other Collector’s Edition entries in the Shout Select catalog, what is included is luckily informative.  Appreciatively ensuring the film’s uncut presentation, Colors’ mileage may vary by viewer but, remains a recommendable watch for its believable expression of L.A. gangs and their very real mean streets of the era.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available now from Shout Select, Colors can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Moving Violations (1985) Blu-ray Review

    Moving Violations (1985)

    Director: Neal Israel

    Starring: John Murray, Jennifer Tilly, James Keach, Wendy Jo Sperber & Sally Kellerman

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    After breaking the rules of the road, Moving Violations finds lazy landscaper Dana Cannon (John Murray, Scrooged) and a group of other disobedient drivers sentenced to traffic school.  When their tight-laced patrolman teacher (James Keach, The Long Riders) and a corrupt judge (Sally Kellerman, Back to School) conspire to cash in on their impounded vehicles, the reckless class shift into high gear to get even.  Neil Israel (Bachelor Party) takes the directing wheel in this comedy crash course.

    From the makers behind Police Academy and borrowing heavily from the boys in blue’s formula, Moving Violations sets an unlucky band of motor vehicilists off in the hilarious race of their lives against the man.  Headlining in one of his few film roles and uncannily exuding the comic charm of elder brother Bill, John Murray’s Dana finds himself wrestling the feathers of traffic deputies Halik (Kean) and Morris (Lisa Hart Carroll, Terms of Endearment) enough to lose his license and land himself behind a desk in a teeth-pulling traffic course.  Joined by a ditzy rocket scientist (Jennifer Tilly, Bride of Chucky), a geeky puppeteer (Brian Backer, The Burning), an unwavering hypochondriac (Wendy Jo Sperber, Back to the Future), a pipe-smoking car doctor (Fred Willard, Best in Show) and a horror movie hound (Ned Eisenberg, Hiding Out) among others, Dana’s incessant sarcasm and class clownish hijinks do him no favors against his strict arresting officer and new teacher, ensuring his class a tough as nails road ahead.  Sparing time for romance with his raspy-voiced NASA classmate and a memorable lovemaking sequence in zero gravity, the classes troubles are only beginning when Halik and their sentencing judge hatch a plan to fail them at all costs in order to split the cost of their impounded cars.  Bending the rules and going behind enemy lines, the license-less students attempt to retrieve the necessary evidence only to have a convention hall of officers on their tails.  Featuring Don Cheadle (The Avengers: Age of Ultron) in his film debut as a fast food server and capturing nostalgic footage of new wave punkers, Moving Violations drives wildly and attracts big laughs thanks to an animated cast and a simplistically silly tale that saves seriousness for the other slowpokes on the road.  A solid entry into the underdogs against higher society genre of comedy making, Moving Violations rarely misses a funny beat and keeps the hilarity honking.

    Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents Moving Violations with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Boasting a healthily filmic appearance with only very scant traces of flakes and speckles, colors are prominent in bold costume choices while, skin tones always read naturally and well-detailed.  Furthermore, exterior daytime sequences seen in the film’s big chase finale are crisply photographed with a nighttime scene set outside of a punk club handling the lower lighting and neon signage just as appropriately.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix that prioritizes dialogue with ease, hiss and cracks are unnoticed while, Sammy Hagar’s “I Can’t Drive 55” makes a notably rockin’ appearance on the track.  Special features include a lively Audio Commentary with Co-Writer/Director Neal Israel that covers all aspects of the film’s development and shooting including, its fast-paced writing process and interesting revelations regarding Michael J. Fox’s interest in the lead role before producer concerns about his age cancelled what could have been and Israel’s own experiences in traffic school.  Finally, Trailers for Moving Violations (1:28), Up the Creek (3:16), Porky’s II: The Next Day (2:26), Porky’s Revenge (1:27) & Miracle Beach (2:01) round out the supplements.

    A well-oiled comedy that hits the ground running with ample absurdity, Moving Violations is a pleasant detour through familiar territory from the era that still holds up.  Featuring funny performances from all, namely Murray, whose comedic timing and mannerisms eerily echo that of his Ghostbusters starring brother, this laugh at punished drivers never runs out of gas.  Meanwhile, KL Studio Classics takes viewers for a ride with a solid HD transfer and a director commentary track well worth listening to.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available December 13th from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, Moving Violations can be purchased via KinoLorber.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers. 

  • Report to the Commissioner (1975) Blu-ray Review

    Report to the Commissioner (1975)

    Director: Milton Katselas

    Starring: Michael Moriarty, Yaphet Kotto, Susan Blakely, Hector Elizondo & Tony King

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set in the gritty landscape of New York City, Report to the Commissioner stars Michael Moriarty (The Stuff) as rookie cop Bo Lockley whose youthful determination leads to the death of a fellow undercover officer.  Yaphet Kotto (Alien), Susan Blakely (The Towering Inferno), Hector Elizondo (Leviathan) and Tony King (Hell Up in Harlem) co-star in this dramatic thriller from the director of When You Comin’ Back, Red Ryder? 

    Based on the novel by James Mills, Report to the Commissioner opens on the tragic aftermath of a shootout leaving one female victim dead.  Redirecting viewers to the events leading up to this fatal outcome, inexperienced cop Bo Lockley (Moriarty) is assigned to track the whereabouts of a young runaway named Chicklet, rumored to be wandering the streets of the Big Apple.  Unbeknownst to Lockley, the alleged runaway is undercover officer Patty Butler (Blakely), willingly shacking up with heroin pusher Thomas “Stick” Henderson (King) in order to gather hard evidence.  While Lockley acts in good confidence to find the missing girl, his role contrived by his superiors is only meant to further convince Stick of his live-in girlfriend’s false identity.  After being advised to forget Chicklet as quickly as he finds her, Lockley is determined to rescue her causing a violent showdown between the inexperienced officer and the neighborhood drug lord.  Shot on location in the bygone grime of New York City’s grindhouse and strip club infested streets, Report to the Commissioner bolsters a strong supporting cast including, Yaphet Kotto as Lockley’s streetwise partner Richard “Crunch” Blackstone, Hector Elizondo as corrupt Captain D’Angelo and a young Richard Gere (American Gigolo) making his screen debut as a fedora wearing pimp.  In addition, Michael Moriarty carries the film superbly well as the conflicted Lockley struggling to maintain a decent stature while, confronted with the dark underbellies of criminals and interdepartmental politics.  After Butler is killed in the middle of gunfire, a tense chase sequence from rooftops to a stalled elevator shaft ensues between Lockley and Stick, leaving the two soaked in perspiration with their guns permanently pointed at one another.  While Lockley’s fate over the shooting of Butler is heavily questioned for the sake of his superiors’ livelihood, Report to the Commissioner concludes on an unexpectedly somber note that will stay with viewers long after the end credits.  Tightly paced and excellently acted, Report to the Commissioner delivers a hard-nosed tale of crime and undercover investigations come undone, leading to a thrilling conclusion.

    Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents Report to the Commissioner with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Boasting natural grain and a noticeably filmic quality, Report to the Commissioner contains only minor flakes in its presentation while, skin tones are lifelike with crisp detail revealing aging lines and constant perspiration in facial closeups.  Meanwhile, black levels contain slightly more speckling without ever compromising watchability.  Joined by a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is always audible even during the film’s many exterior scenes set against the hustle and bustle of New York City streets.  Composer Elmer Bernstein’s (The Great Escape, Ghostbusters) score and the film’s few gunfire moments ring loudly when designated.  Arriving virtually barebones, special features included are limited to the film’s Theatrical Trailer (2:21).

    In his second to last feature film, Director Milton Katselas’ exploration of a rookie cop’s idealism amongst the crime and politics of New York City delivers ample drama and action.  Supported by a committed cast and the tonally perfect landscape of the Big Apple’s nearly forgotten dangers, Report to the Commissioner is an exceptional police procedural that showcases the seedier sides of those who are meant to uphold the law.  Graduating to an impressive high-definition transfer, Kino Lorber Studio Classics preserves the rich, filmic quality of this gritty drama much to the delight of viewers.  Suspenseful and action-oriented, Report to the Commissioner earns its badge of approval.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available July 7th from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, Report to the Commissioner can be purchased via KinoLorber.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • An Eye for an Eye (1981) / Hero and the Terror (1988) Blu-ray Reviews


    An Eye for an Eye (1981) / Hero and the Terror (1988)

    Director(s): Steve Carver / William Tannen

    Starring: Chuck Norris, Christopher Lee, Mako & Maggie Cooper / Chuck Norris, Brynn Thayer, Steve James & Jack O’Halloran

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Serving up two explosive action outings from the 1980s, Kino Lorber Studio Classics proudly presents An Eye for an Eye, starring Chuck Norris (Missing in Action, The Delta Force) as San Francisco detective Sean Kane (Norris).  Consumed with revenge following the murder of his partner, Kane ditches the badge for vigilante justice to expose a powerful drug ring responsible for the crime.  Christopher Lee (The Wicker Man), Richard Roundtree (Shaft), Mako (Sidekicks), Terry Kiser (Weekend at Bernie’s) and Maggie Cooper (Falcon Crest) co-star.  Next up, Chuck Norris headlines as Los Angeles detective Danny O’Brien in Hero and the Terror.  After nearly losing his life to capture ruthless serial killer Simon Moon A.K.A “The Terror”, O’Brien is haunted by nightmarish memories of the ordeal.  Escaping prison years later, The Terror is back on the loose and claiming victims left and right with O’Brien the city’s only hope to stop him.  Bryan Thayer (Kansas), Steve James (American Ninja) and Jack O’Halloran (Superman II) co-star.      

    Following the murder of his partner, San Francisco detective Sean Kane quits the force in order to wage a war of revenge on those responsible.  After his fallen partner’s girlfriend Linda (Chao) informs Kane that a massive drug cartel was behind the murder, Linda falls prey to the deadly wrath of the organization.  Appearing in one of his first starring roles, international superstar Chuck Norris takes hold of the part as a broken police officer determined to find his friends killer’s with a staunch seriousness that lets his fists do most of the talking.  Far from lacking a sense of humor, Kane seeks out his martial arts mentor and Linda’s father, Chan (Mako), to aid him in the hunt while, simultaneously providing viewers with a comedic chemistry as Chan constantly criticizes his protege’s concentration during dangerous encounters.  Surrounded by a colossal cast of living legends and character actors, An Eye for an Eye pits Kane against the charming yet, merciless drug lord Morgan Canfield (Lee) who intends to unload a major import of narcotics into the country, unless he can be stopped.  While the film’s premise may feel generic, An Eye for an Eye plays to its strengths with sequences of heavy gunfire and explosions plus, countless opportunities for Norris to partake in hand to hand combat or lack thereof when Kane’s hands are bound allowing him to only kick his assailants.  Uncovering a web of police corruption throughout his investigation and engaging in a steamy fling with Linda’s news editor, Kane puts those closest to him in danger the deeper he digs.  Marking their first collaboration (followed by 1983’s Lone Wolf McQuade), Director Steve Carver injects the necessary bits of adrenaline to keep the film moving while, the beardless Norris roundhouse kicks his way to a final standoff with Canfield’s impenetrable, elevator-shoe wearing bodyguard.  An entertaining and well-cast production, An Eye for an Eye delivers in the action department while, serving as an admirable early effort for Norris as his star status rose to greater prominence.

    Based on the novel by Michael Blodgett, Hero and the Terror would serve as an attempt for star Chuck Norris to grow beyond his traditional martial arts star roots.  Reteaming once again with Cannon Films, Norris plays the lead role of detective Danny O’Brien, haunted by his past of a serial killer he captured years prior.  Preparing for the birth of his daughter with his girlfriend Kay (Thayer), O’Brien’s world is turned upside down when news emerges that Simon Moon has escaped.  Presumed dead after a motor vehicle accident, O’Brien is confident The Terror has not only survived but, claiming new victims.  Meanwhile, as the city of Los Angeles celebrates the renovation of a theater Moon once used as a hideaway, women who were last seen on the premises begin disappearing.  Convinced The Terror has returned home, O’Brien begins hunting  for the unstoppable killer in the secret passages of the theater.  With an intriguing plot and suspenseful opening, Hero and the Terror quickly derails as O’Brien’s relationship with his pregnant girlfriend and her commitment issues take center stage.  Focusing too deeply to be considered mere character development, the tame action-thriller begins to share more in common with a soap opera.  As more victims emerge including a fellow officer, O’Brien uncovers Moon’s secret whereabouts leading to the most exciting brawl of the film on the rooftop of the theater.  Lacking a conscience and possessing virtually supernatural strength, Moon’s character feels slightly out of touch in a film that appears grounded in reality.  Failing to capture an audience at the time of its release, Hero and the Terror tanked at the box-office and would ultimately end Norris’ relationship with Cannon Films.  Although the skeleton of its premise is inviting, Hero and the Terror unfortunately fails in its execution.

    Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents both An Eye for an Eye and Hero and the Terror with 1080p transfers, sporting 1.85:1 aspect ratios.  While possessing minimal softness, An Eye for an Eye bolsters a filmic appearance with healthy colors and clear detail in facial features.  Arriving later in the decade and appearing slightly sharper than its predecessor, Hero and the Terror also relays a strong sense of color and texture.  In addition, both films possess respectable black levels while, instances of flakes and mild murkiness are captured but not overwhelming.  Satisfying in both cases, Hero and the Terror squeaks by as the favored transfer.  Equipped with DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mixes, both films deliver dialogue respectfully although, moments of hushed tones can sometimes be overwhelmed by external factors.  The heavier shootouts and fireworks explosion in An Eye for an Eye deliver an added sharpness while both film’s scores are implemented nicely.  Special features found on An Eye for an Eye include, an Audio Commentary with Director Steve Carver, An Eye for an Eye Theatrical Trailer (1:52) and the Hero and the Terror  Theatrical Trailer (1:26) while, Norris’ 1988 effort recycles the An Eye for an Eye Theatrical Trailer (1:52) and the Hero and the Terror Theatrical Trailer (1:26).

    Pulverizing retro action fans with a double helping of Chuck Norris, An Eye for an Eye may possess a routine plot but, delivers where it counts with fun doses of action and an entertaining cast that easily trumps the missed opportunity of Hero and the Terror.  Riding high on the success of his previous Cannon Films efforts, Norris’ attempt to diversify himself was an honorable move that unfortunately backfired and ended his Cannon alliance.  Meanwhile, Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents both films with appreciable boosts in quality that will please likeminded action buffs as they kick and punch these adventures into high gear.

    An Eye for an Eye RATING: 3.5/5

    Hero and the Terror RATING: 2/5

    Available June 16th from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, An Eye for an Eye and Hero and the Terror can be purchased via KinoLorber.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Best Seller (1987) Blu-ray Review

    Best Seller (1987)

    Director: John Flynn

    Starring: James Woods, Brian Deenehy & Victoria Tennant

    Released by: Olive Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From the director of Rolling Thunder, Best Seller centers on veteran police office and best-selling author Dennis Meechum (Brian Deenehy, First Blood).  Widowed and raising his only daughter, Dennis owes his publisher an overdue followup but, suffers from writer’s block.  When Cleve (James Woods, Videodrome), a self-professed career hitman, approaches Dennis about penning his story, Dennis is skeptical but, intrigued.  As the facts surrounding Cleve’s many hits for a high powered executive turn out true, the possibility of the damaging tell-all tale endangers Dennis and those closest to him.  Victoria Tennant (Flowers in the Attic), Allison Balson (Little House on the Prairie) and Paul Shenar (Scarface) co-star.

    Scripted by Larry Cohen (The Stuff, Maniac Cop), although, heavily rewritten by Director John Flynn, Best Seller kicks off in Los Angeles circa 1972 where a trio of Richard Nixon mask wearing gunmen attempt to rob a police evidence facility.  After a struggle ensues and shots are fired, Officer Dennis Meechum (Deenehy) survives the account to publish a novel based on his experiences.  Over a decade later, Meechum, now a detective and raising his only daughter following his wife’s untimely passing, owes his publisher a long overdue followup.  From the shadows, Cleve (Woods) offers Dennis a proposition to pen his life experiences as a career hitman in order to get even with his unappreciative former employer, wealthy executive David Matlock (Shenar).  Curious but, cautious, Dennis is not easily convinced about his collaborators evidence until threats confront them both.  In addition, Dennis realizes that his history with Cleve predates their most recent encounter, making trust between the detective and hitman incredibly tense.  As research continues on the tell-all book, Dennis finds himself in over his head with his daughter in mortal danger.

    Failing to light the box-office on fire, Best Seller is a uniquely different buddy film where law enforcement and career criminal must team up to combat a larger threat.  Brian Deenehy fits comfortably in the role of a respected detective who finds himself unable to produce material for a followup novel.  Dennehy treads the line perfectly of an aggressive cop willing to go to the limits while, possessing an air of sophistication that sells his dual career as a respected author.  Meanwhile, James Woods, in arguably his most underrated role of the decade, plays the snappily dressed Cleve with a fast tongue and an even quicker trigger finger.  Woods brings the right energy that makes Dennis and the viewer equally intrigued and unsure of his questionable motives.  From a kindhearted demeanor to a bloodthirsty killer instinct, Woods’ performance and his yin and yang relationship with Deenehy elevates the film beyond the standard crime picture.  Shot on location in Los Angeles and New York City, Best Seller is a throughly entertaining and tightly orchestrated effort that separates itself from the bunch, courtesy of Woods and Deenehy’s captivating chemistry.

    Olive Films presents Best Seller with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Beginning with a noticeably softer image, the film quickly improves with inviting skin tones and a well-handled color scheme.  Flakes and speckles are mild leading to a nearly blemish free picture while, detail in close-ups wavers in sharpness from decent to strong.  With a healthy layer of grain intact throughout the majority of its runtime, Best Seller satisfies on high-definition.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Stereo mix, the film relays all dialogue with clarity and ample range while, Composer Jay Ferguson’s (License to Drive, Bad Dreams) far too brief funky synth score sets the mood accordingly.  Finally, the sole supplement is the film’s Theatrical Trailer (1:44).

    Criminally (no pun intended) underrated and capturing top-notch performances from its two leads, Best Seller takes the buddy formula of past crime offerings and delivers a refreshingly suspenseful response.  Olive Films’ high-definition treatment will appease viewers while, the strength of the film and most notably, Woods’ role earning Best Seller a strong recommendation to the uninformed.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Olive Films, Best Seller can be purchased via OliveFilms.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Wolfcop (2014) Blu-ray Review

    Wolfcop (2014)

    Director: Lowell Dean

    Starring: Leo Fafard, Amy Matysio, Sarah Lind, Corinne Conley & Jonathan Cherry

    Released by: Image Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Wolfcop centers on alcoholic policeman Lou Garou (Leo Fafard) as he continues his steady routine of drinking excessively and working minimally.  When a series of violent events take place, Lou is left with a pentagram carved into his chest and the ability to become a werewolf.  To solve the mystery of his transformation and the rampant conspiracies of his town, Lou joins forces with his partner to better protect and serve under a full moon.  Amy Matysio (Stranded), Sarah Lind (True Justice), Corinne Conley (Quads!) and Jonathan Cherry (Final Destination 2) co-star.

    Following in the tradition of other contemporary grindhouse efforts, Wolfcop combines the occult and police procedural with its tongue firmly planted in cheek.  Shot on a relatively tight budget, Wolfcop shines with impressive practical effects and grounded performances that help anchor the film from flying completely off the rails.  Content being a drunk, Officer Lou Garou (Fafard) shows little passion for his work until a mysterious encounter with cult members turn Lou into a ravaging werewolf at the sight of a full moon.  Determined to uncover the truth behind his new abilities, Lou teams up with dimwitted local Willie Higgins (Cherry) and his hardworking partner Tina (Matysio), only to discover a sea of corruption and sinister occult activities running their small town.  Delivered with a breezy runtime, Wolfcop takes full advantage of its B-movie concept with gory transformation sequences, rampant shootouts and a surprisingly tasteful prison sex scene between its hairy star and a sexy bartender.  The mysterious cult members desire Lou’s wolf blood to prolong their own lifespan, prompting Lou to take control and once again show pride for the shield he bears.  Satanism, ruthless gangs and a last stand at sundown  attempt to overthrow the fanged officer and his partner, leading to an unsurprisingly violent finale.  

    While, its over the top nature is well suited for its material, Wolfcop’s conscience attempts to capture a bygone era of filmmaking feel slightly tired and late to the party.  Making the most of its budget, Wolfcop stuns with its creature design and many gore effects provided by Emerson Ziffle (Curse of Chucky), showcasing true talent under difficult circumstances.  Occasionally humorous while, reveling in its eccentricities, Wolfcop is a fun homage to the energy of 80s cult hits but, feels a bit too self aware for its own good.

    Image Entertainment presents Wolfcop with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Bursting with solid color and nicely handled skin tones, Wolfcop satisfies immensely on high-definition.  Meanwhile, black levels are handled with care and no crushing to speak of with only mild softness during the film’s final sequence which is more attributed to the sun’s position.  Equipped with DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is always crisp with action sequences and music by Shooting Star relayed with proper authority.  Packed with bonus content, special features include, an Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Lowell Dean and Special Effects Artist Emerson Ziffle, the lengthy Wolfcop Unleashed Behind the Scenes Featurette (45:51), the multi-part The Birth of Wolfcop (14:48), Film Outtakes (3:10), Wolfcop Music Video (2:50), Theatrical Trailer (1:39), Original Concept Trailer (2:20), Skydive Promo (0:37), Trailer Park Boys Shout Out (1:26) and a Special Thanks credit sequence (1:01) round out the extensive supplements.

    Earnestly brought to fruition, Wolfcop impresses with its technical achievements realized under its modest budget.  Blending genres and yearning to be a modern day cult classic, Wolfcop is not as memorable as one would hope given the volume of other produced and even less memorable wannabe grindhouse efforts.  While, far from the instant cult hit it claims to be, cult fans certainly haven’t seen the last of the razor-toothed boozer with a sequel promised at its end credits.  Meanwhile, Image Entertainment’s Blu-ray release is a knock-out with solid video and audio specs as well as a beefy array of bonus content for fans to bite into.  While, its mileage may vary with viewers, Wolfcop has some howlingly entertaining moments but, never rises to a wholly memorable level.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available as a Best Buy exclusive until May 12th from Image Entertainment, Wolfcop can be purchased via BestBuy.com and other fine retailers.