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Currently showing posts tagged Romance

  • They're Playing with Fire (1984) Blu-ray Review

    They’re Playing with Fire (1984)

    Director: Howard Avedis

    Starring: Sybil Danning, Eric Brown, Andrew Prine & Paul Clemens

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Combining skin and thrills, They’re Playing with Fire stars Sybil Danning (Howling II: Your Sister Is a Werewolf) as a sultry college professor who seduces a horny student (Eric Brown, Private Lessons), entangling him in a dangerous plot to obtain her in-laws wealthy inheritance.  Andrew Prine (Amityville II: The Possession) and Paul Clemens (The Beast Within) costar.

    Shrouded as a wild sex-romp in tune with most young men’s desires, They’re Playing with Fire, albeit being very tantalizing, pulls the carpet under its audience in one of the oddest genre switch ups of the decade.  Incessantly drooling over his foxy professor, Mrs. Diane Stevens, and performing odd jobs aboard her luxurious yacht, college student Jay Richard’s lusting pays off when seduced by the blonde bombshell.  Unknowingly plotting a scheme with her husband Michael (Prine) to inherit his family riches from her in-laws, a virtually harmless crack at prowling to scare off the elderly Stevens’ backfires on Jay when a masked assailant ruthlessly knocks off Michael’s mother and grandmother instead.  Trapping him in a seductive love triangle with life or death stakes, Jay’s hormonal jackpot grows grayer by the day.  Regarded as exploitation royalty, Sybil Danning makes mouths water with her fiercely flirtatious performance and sizzling nude sequences that, much to the delight of teenage boys during the video boom, are plentiful.  In a deliriously unexpected spin for viewers assuming the plot from its provocative poster art, They’re Playing with Fire morphs into an erotically-charged thriller with slasher elements that pollinate the film with bloody bursts of violence catching first time watchers off guard.  Helmed by Howard Avedis (Scorchy, Mortuary), They’re Playing with Fire, rightly earning Danning one of her finest performances in a career of countlessly sexy and sleazy roles, is a wild effort right down to its even kookier reveal of the true murderer that is as unusually different as it is libido driving.

    Newly remastered, KL Studio Classics upgrades They’re Playing with Fire with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Revealing satisfying layers of detail in facial features, skin tones are sound with Danning certainly showing off her fair share during the film’s many moments of passion.  Meanwhile, costumes, background pieces and bolder colored vehicles pop quite decently with the film’s source material arriving in tiptop shape and generally free of any unsavory scratches.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix that handles character exchanges, both in intimate, hushed tones and louder barroom environments, nicely while, music cues are well orchestrated and ear-pleasing.  Special features include, Sun & Seduction with Sybil Danning (18:25) where the still mightily attractive lead reveals she landed the role based on her appearance in Playboy Magazine and her initial concerns that the script was overly convoluted.  Furthermore, Danning recalls many a fan encounters where the film played heavily into their puberty and instances of teens stealing the videotape from their fathers!  The genre titan, although finding him cute, reveals costar Eric Brown made the shoot difficult due to his unwillingness to be nude in the film.  Lastly, Trailers for They’re Playing with Fire (1:25), The Bitch (2:38) and The Stud (2:52) conclude the disc’s supplements.

    Beloved by Mr. Skin himself and most young men who experienced the film’s sumptuous offerings during its heyday, They’re Playing with Fire offers plenty of bare-breasted Sybil Danning and a chameleon-like plot that supplies an alarmingly fun touch of slasher elements for fans of the decade’s body count pictures.  A career high for the buxom B-movie queen, carnal delights never tasted this sweet or deadly before her voluptuous college professor wraps her legs around such impressionable hound dogs.  KL Studio Classics’ high-def handling of the sexy sizzler is a solid boost in quality with Danning’s newly recorded chatty sit-down a fine inclusion.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available now from KL Studio Classics, They’re Playing with Fire can be purchased via KinoLorber.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Beauty and the Beast (2017) Blu-ray Review

    Beauty and the Beast (2017)

    Director: Bill Condon

    Starring: Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans, Kevin Kline, Josh Gad, Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci, Audra McDonald, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Ian McKellen & Emma Thompson

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Reimagining Disney’s animated masterpiece into live-action, Beauty and the Beast tells the time-honored tale of the bookish Belle (Emma Watson, The Perks of Being a Wallflower) whose eternal imprisonment in the castle of a cursed Beast (Dan Stevens, The Guest) morphs into an unexpected chance at love.  

    Perhaps more anticipated than Disney’s previous 21st century fairy tale adaptations and cautiously guarded by enthusiasts who value the 1991 version as a treasured benchmark of the Disney Renaissance era, Beauty and the Beast waltzes with whimsy and charm that harnesses the magic of its predecessor while, enchanting audiences through its live performances and visual-effects wizardry.  Straying closely to its counterparts narrative beats, Emma Watson stuns as the ideal Belle whose independent personality shines brightly and singing chops bring new dimension to Alan Menken and Howard Ashman’s classic songs.  Furthermore, Dan Stevens conjures an intimidating ferociousness and tenderness in his role as the Beast that growls through his digitized masking while, Luke Evans (The Girl on the Train) flexes his muscles as the living embodiment of the egotistical Gaston.  Meanwhile, Josh Gad (Frozen) consistently steals scenes as the suggestively gay LeFou with his clumsy humor and hopeless crush on Gaston offering the biggest laughs with an impressive supporting roster of thespians including, Ewan McGregor (Big Fish) as the french candelabra Lumière, Ian McKellen (Mr. Holmes) as the worrisome Cogsworth and Emma Thompson (Saving Mr. Banks) as the warm Mrs. Potts all bringing their inanimate characters to life in colorful fashion.  

    Enrapturing the film with fantastical glow and intricate detail, Production Designer Sarah Greenwood’s (Atonement) efforts are a work of art unto themselves while, the fan-favorite tunes continue to cast their enchanting spell on audiences with several new musical arrangements on hand including, “How Does A Moment Last Forever” by Celine Dion.  For all its dazzling majesty and subtle enhancements that bond Belle and the beast’s romance through shared grief, the trickiness of bringing a lifelike beast creature to reality falters when sharing the screen with the very real Watson.  Lacking the believability of the animal characters found in Disney’s groundbreaking reinvention of The Jungle Book, the Beast’s appearance works respectably on its own while demonstrating its obvious shortcomings in closeups that never fully suspends our disbelief and slightly takes attention away from intimate sequences.  Concurrently, the castle’s cursed inhabitants in their possession form are a visual marvel, making splashing sequences such as their dinner table rendition of “Be Our Guest” one of the film’s most memorable.  Ultimately, Beauty and the Beast is overwhelmingly delightful with Bill Condon’s (Dreamgirls) grand direction perfectly suited for the musical material.  As warmly conducted as its animated brethren, Disney’s latest interpretation of Beauty and the Beast reaffirms the tale’s splendor and reputation as one of the greatest romances of all-time.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Beauty and the Beast with a sparkling 1080p transfer, preserving its 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Radiating with pristine quality, Belle’s quaint village glows under sunny skies while the grim and cobweb-infested layers of the Beast’s castle are presented with striking clarity.  Furthermore, skin tones appear warm and naturally inviting with Belle’s dazzling golden gown and the castle’s CG-rendered characters bursting with detail and colorful grace.  Yet another knockout transfer for the Mouse House, Beauty and the Beast will leave viewers visually waltzing in wonder!  Equipped with an equally exceptional DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix that relays the crispest of dialogue levels while taking full advantage of the film’s musical compositions, the track is nothing short of sonically fantastic.  

    As well stocked as the inhabitants in the Beast’s towering estate, special features include, Enchanted Table Read (13:31) giving viewers a unique look at one of the most theatrical read-throughs of any production captured on film, A Beauty of a Tale (27:08) finds the filmmakers and cast members discussing their attractions and utmost responsibility in telling this tale faithfully yet with its own unique charms while, The Women Behind Beauty and the Beast (5:17) spotlights the creative contributions to the film by Production Designer Sarah Greenwood, Set Decorator Katie Spencer, Costume Designer Jacqueline Durran, Casting Director Lucy Bevan and Editor Virginia Katz.  Additionally, From Song to Screen: Making the Musical Sequences (13:26), Extended Song: “Days in the Sun” with Introduction by Bill Condon (4:08), Deleted Scenes (6:23) also accompanied by an Introduction by Condon and Making a Moment with Celine Dion (3:24) where the emotional singer shares her personal ties to the project’s 1991 originator and the honor of being asked to contribute to its live-action counterpart.  Finally, the “Beauty and the Beast” Music Video by Ariana Grande and John Legend (4:02), Making the Music Video: “Beauty and the Beast” (2:07), a Disney Song Selection (33:09) that allows viewers to jump to the film’s musical sequences and Sneak Peeks at Cars 3 (0:57) and Descendants 2 (0:32) conclude the on-disc supplemental offerings while, a DVD edition and Digital HD Code are also included.

    Unanimously loved by both audiences and critics, Beauty and the Beast’s magical live-action makeover would skyrocket to billion dollar success ultimately becoming the most profitable movie musical of all time.  Retaining the enchanting splendor of its predecessor while using today’s technology and a stunning new cast under the guidance of musically minded director Bill Condon, Beauty and the Beast ensures its time-old tale of romance lives on for another generation.  As efficient as ever, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment delivers another first-rate example of high-definition excellence with an appetizing selection of bonus features for seconds.  With the exception of its absent 3D edition that, similar to The Jungle Book’s home video strategy, is most surely to come at a later date, Beauty and the Beast comes highly recommended for fairy tale devotees and Disney lovers alike.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available June 6th from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Beauty and the Beast can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Tangled: Before Ever After (2017) DVD Review

    Tangled: Before Ever After (2017)

    Director(s): Tom Caulfield & Stephen Sandoval

    Starring: Zachary Levi, Mandy Moore, Eden Espinosa, Clancy Brown, Julie Bowen & Jeffrey Tambor

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Taking place after the events of the original film but before the lead characters’ eventual marriage, Tangled: Before Ever After brings the charming heart and humor of Rapunzel and beau Eugene to the small screen in this original movie event, kickstarting its new episodic series.  Exchanging its slick computer-generated animation for a more traditional 2D style that echoes an illustrated storybook come to life, Rapunzel, although thrilled to be back home and surrounded by loved ones, struggles to adapt to her new royal lifestyle and the responsibilities it demands.  Temporarily turning down the love of her life’s proposal in order to explore sights beyond her castle walls, the barefoot beauty teams up with her resourceful aide Cassandra and encounters a mystical rock formation that returns her lengthy locks.  Attempting to fulfill her coronation ceremony, danger is not far behind as the vengeful Lady Kaine and her ruffians seek to infiltrate the castle leaving Rapunzel and Flynn, along with their animal friends, leading the defense.  Welcoming back the voice talents of Zachary Levi and Mandy Moore, Tangled: Before Ever After sets the stage for the Disney Channel’s seemingly surefire followup to the much loved feature.  Introducing new characters, familiar locations and retaining the enchanting tone audiences fell in love with several years ago, this anticipated return for Corona’s favorite couple, complimented by new original songs by legendary Disney composer Alan Menken (The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast), is a romantically fun adventure fans will looks favorably upon.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Tangled: Before Ever After in a widescreen format, bearing a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Digitally mastered and warmly preserving its very vibrant color scheme, characters and busier castle backgrounds look solid making the watching experience a satisfactory one.  Joined by a Dolby Digital 2.0 mix, dialogue is efficiently handled while, the Menken penned song numbers give the track a subtle but, gracious boost in quality.  Bonus goodies include, four Short Cuts mini movies including, Checkmate (2:32), Prison Bake (2:22), Make Me Smile (2:32) and Hare Peace (2:27).  Furthermore, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Elena of Avalor (0:48), Descendants 2 (0:34) and Born in China (1:16) are also included.  Lastly, an Exclusive Replica of Rapunzel’s Journal, as seen in the film, is also included in the packaging.  Fans awaiting for more fairy tales to be told from the world of Tangled, fear not, as this humorous new beginning for the beloved characters is on par with the magic of its 2010 originator.  With its formal series now airing and already renewed for a second season, Tangled: Before Ever After is the perfect start to catching up with Rapunzel and Flynn Rider, making for a prime Easter basket treat for young viewers this holiday season.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Tangled: Before Ever After can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend (1949) Blu-ray Review

    The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend (1949)

    Director: Preston Sturges

    Starring: Betty Grable, Cesar Romero, Rudy Vallee, Olga San Juan, Sterling Holloway, Hugh Herbert, El Brendel, Porter Hall & Pati Behrs

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    When sexy saloon gal Freddie Jones (Betty Grable, I Wake Up Screaming) rages with jealousy towards her beau and accidentally shoots a judge, The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend finds the crack shot, skipping town, masquerading as a schoolteacher and striking up a new romance with a well-to-do mine owner until trouble finds her again.  Cesar Romero (Batman), Rudy Vallee (Gentlemen Marry Brunettes), Olga San Juan (Variety Girl) and Porter Hall (His Girl Friday) comprise the supporting cast.

    Marking the Technicolor debut of Preston Sturges (Sullivan’s Travels), The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend is a lighthearted western-comedy that despite Grable’s lovely singing sequences and its vibrant costume designs, lacks the spark of Sturges’ earlier efforts.  Vivacious and handy with a six-shooter, saloon starlet Freddie Jones lets her emotions get the best of her when her gambling boyfriend Blackie Jobero (Romero) takes up with another woman.  Not one to be walked all over, Freddie’s vengeful rage backfires when a missed gunshot finds its way into the derrière of a judge (Porter), guaranteeing her time behind bars.  When her dependable charm turns clumsy, Freddie, along with her coworker Conchita (San Juan), hightail it to Snake City where her cover as an absent-minded schoolteacher and love interest in a gold miner are tested, jeopardizing her life for completely new reasons.  A box-office blunder with its star thinking none too kindly of its finished product, The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend is simplistically silly with slapstick gags on display during a third act shootout that amuse yet, never dares to stray from its innocently contrived formula.  Corralling humorous turns from its supporting players, this hot-headed blonde’s getaway makes for a middle of the road detour in Struges’ otherwise impressive body of work.

    Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.33:1 aspect ratio.  While outdoor sequences occasionally suffer from blown out whites and skin tones, particularly in the male cast, wither into yellowish levels at times, Grable’s rosy cheeks are brightly highlighted.  Elements appear in strong order with little to no fallbacks while, the Technicolor photography brings bold life to the film’s costume choices.  Meanwhile, black levels are consistent yet predominately flat.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix that projects crisp dialogue exchanges and even healthier singing sequences, any cracks and pops are insubstantial with gunshot effects emphasized accordingly.  Trailers for I Wake Up Screaming (2:16), Daddy Long Legs (2:14), The Devil’s Disciple (2:56) and Support Your Local Sheriff (3:03) are the only supplements included.

    A lesser work than Sturges’ more prominent favorites, The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend passes for casual entertainment with meager staying value.  Mildly funny with the bulk of its humor derived from sexual innuendos in the wake of production code censors, Grable’s a doll but her personality only takes the film so far.  Meanwhile, Kino Lorber Studio Classics’ HD treatment satisfies although no feature related supplements are on hand.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend can be purchased via KinoLorber.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Grandview, U.S.A. (1984) Blu-ray Review

    Grandview, U.S.A. (1984)

    Director: Randal Kleiser

    Starring: Jamie Lee Curtis, C. Thomas Howell, Patrick Swayze, Jennifer Jason Leigh, M. Emmet Walsh & Troy Donahue

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From the director of Grease, Grandview, U.S.A. centers on the romantic love triangle between demolition derby owner Michelle “Mike” Cody (Jamie Lee Curtis, Halloween), her hotshot driver Ernie “Slam” Webster (Patrick Swayze, Dirty Dancing) and high school graduate Tim Pearson (C. Thomas Howell, The Outsiders) in the rural community they call home.  

    Longing to follow his dreams of studying oceanography, recent high school graduate Tim Pearson finds himself bewitched by the beautiful proprietor of Cody’s Speedway Mike Cody after requiring a tow.  Struggling to keep up with repairs to her late father’s business while her star driver Slam Webster discovers his wife (Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight) is cheating on him, heartache and confusion settles in for the grease-monkey enthusiasts.  Displeased with his father’s dishonesty to shut down Mike’s business for the town’s own greedy advancements, Tim’s music video styled daydreams about Mike prompts a romantic fling between the two and a demolition derby debut for the former high schooler.  Meanwhile, intoxicated with anger towards his estranged wife and getting even by hilariously bulldozing his former residence, Slam’s own desires for Mike come to light forging an emotionally sensitive crossroad between the trio.  Shot on location in Illinois, Grandview, U.S.A. spotlights an impressive cast of young talent at the peak of their careers, an idyllic small-town American setting and a soundtrack of MTV hits from Air Supply and Robert Ponger & Falco.  Although boasting watchable performances with appealing chemistry plus, brief appearances from Michael Winslow (Police Academy) and the Cusack siblings, Grandview, U.S.A. missteps with an unraveling third act that hosts a business in flames and relationships forged that make Tim’s encounter with Mike all but pointless.  Driving off into the sunset with Slam’s damaged vehicle and his intended future ahead, Grandview, U.S.A. works itself out far too simply with little regard to its promising setup.  Hardly a destructive mess, this three-lane love story runs out of fuel by its conclusion, leaving viewers only decently entertained and mildly disappointed.

    Newly remastered in high-definition, Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents Grandview, U.S.A. with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Appearing rather radiant sans minor speckling, colors in costumes are boastful while skin tones are natural and nicely detailed.  Meanwhile, the rural farmland community is lusciously preserved with film grain firmly intact.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is sufficiently handled with zero cracks or pops sidetracking its presentation.  Music cuts and car crashing effects prominently heard during derby sequences make ample notices on the mix as well.  In addition, an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix has also been included for your listening pleasure.  Unfortunately, no special features of any kind are included on this release.

    With promising ingredients from its homey setting and talented leads, Grandview, U.S.A. takes an unfortunate detour into mediocrity with a finale that puts all its pieces back together haphazardly.  Worthy of a view for its cast assemblage alone, Kino Lorber Studio Classics debuts the film on high-definition with a gorgeously filmic presentation that should easily appease viewers while, the lack of any supplemental offerings remains unfortunate.  Although viewers may not want to remain full-time residents, Grandview, U.S.A. is still cautiously recommended to visit.  

    RATING: 3/5

    Available September 6th from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, Grandview, U.S.A. can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (2015) Blu-ray Review

    Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (2015)

    Director(s): Tim Skousen & Jeremy Coon

    Starring: Chris Strompolos, Eric Zala & Jayson Lamb

    Released by: Drafthouse Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Transfixed by Director Steven Spielberg’s trailblazing 1981 blockbuster, Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made documents the journey of three 11-year-old boys from Mississippi who took home movies to an unprecedented level with their own shot-for-shot adaptation, filmed over the course of seven grueling years.  With the exception of the film’s explosive airplane sequence, the tenacious trio and their loyal supporters reunite 20 years later to complete their ambitious project.

    A testament to childhood dreams coming true and quite possibly the most disciplined example of sticktoitiveness, Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made recounts the unbelievably true tale of Mississippi youths who, from the wreckage of divorced families and introverted personalities, escaped their realities to capture the greatest adventure of their lives on videotape.  After bonding over their mutual love for Spielberg’s archeological hero and his cinematic debut, Eric Zala and Chris Strompolos would forge a friendship built on their love for film and their desire to helm their own grassroots adaptation.  Teaming with fellow eccentric Jayson Lamb and a revolving door of younger siblings and neighborhood kids, Zala, acting as director in addition to playing multiple onscreen roles while, Strompolos dons the iconic fedora and whip as Indiana Jones, sacrifice summer vacations and weekends over several years to do their treasured feature justice.  Risking life and limb with little to no interference from overprotective parents, Zala and Strompolos leap and drag themselves from moving vehicles while nearly burning their house and selves on fire to capture the perfect shots during the pre-Internet days of youth.  Juxtaposing the two friends detailing the early origins of the film and their regrettably final missing sequence, filmmaker Eli Roth (Cabin Fever), Ain’t It Cool News’ Harry Knowles and Raiders of the Lost Ark star John Rhys-Davies make talking head appearances expressing their admiration and discovery of their diamond in the rough accomplishment.

    In addition, Zala and Strompolos’ parents, wives and supportive crew members are on hand to shape the narrative that is littered with as much agony as there are triumphs.  Endless frustration, high school romances, jealousy and an eventual fallout between the two friends would halt production for years creating two very different life paths that would merge once again following the cult popularity of their circulated childhood tape.  Potentially sacrificing their day jobs to fulfill what they started in their southern backyards years earlier, Zala and Strompolos, tighter than ever before, attempt to finally wrap their long in-development shoot with the highly explosive airplane sequence from the original film.  Plagued with horrendous weather conditions, ballooning budgets and a frightening onset accident, Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made is emotionally riveting and overwhelmingly inspiring.  Living vicariously through the colorful subjects who never lost sight of a vision that seemed impossible, Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made will leave viewers joyously teary-eyed and tipping their own fedoras at real-life heroes that will make you feel that all dreams are within reach.

    Drafthouse Films presents Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Produced in the high-def digital age, footage is pleasingly sharp and well-detailed during the predominate interview sequences and onset footage with only snippets from the VHS sourced Raiders adaptation being of expected lesser quality.  Equipped with a Dolby Digital 5.1 mix, dialogue is excellently captured while, the chaotic footage of the airplane sequence boasts several explosions that bode nicely on the track.  In addition, an optional Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo mix has also been included for your listening pleasure.  Meanwhile, bonus features include, an Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Tim Skousen & Producer/Director Jeremy Coon plus, a second Audio Commentary with The Raiders Guys Eric Zala & Chris Strompolos.  Furthermore, Deleted Scenes (32:39), Outtakes from the Adaptation (19:33), the Q&A at Alamo Drafthouse Premiere of the Adaptation (40:43) captured on May 31, 2003, Trailers for Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made’s Theatrical Trailer (2:08) and other Drafthouse Films features including, 20,000 Days on Earth (2:15), A Band Called Death (2:12), The Final Member (2:02) and I Declare War (1:47) are also included.  Lastly, a 16-page booklet containing reproductions of Zala’s hand drawn storyboards for the adaptation, a DVD edition, Digital HD Code and Reversible Cover Art round out the supplements.

    Akin to Indy defying the Nazi’s and heroically saving the day, Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made is the embodiment of movie magic come to life.  Retracing their ambitious, troubled and above all, dedicated passion project from their preteen years to its midlife conclusion, John Williams’ goosebump-inducing anthem will no longer conjure images of just everyone’s favorite archeologist but also, the Mississippi boys to men who dared to dream with the Holy Grail always in their mind’s eye.  Drafthouse Films’ acquisition and top-notch presentation of this first-rate documentary makes for one of the most emotionally uplifting chronicles of the year!

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available now from Drafthouse Films, Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made can be purchased via DrafthouseFilms.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984)

    Director: W.D. Richter

    Starring: Peter Weller, John Lithgow, Ellen Barkin, Christopher Lloyd, Jeff Goldblum, Lewis Smith & Ronald Lacey

    Released by: Shout Select

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    A cocktail of genre mashups, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension stars Peter Weller (RoboCop) as the titular, jack of all trades hero who dabbles in neurosurgery while, fronting a popular rock band and saves the world for kicks.  After his breakthrough matter traveling device, the Oscillation Overthruster, is sought after by a threatening squad of aliens, Banzai and his pals seek to protect humanity from the wrath of their thick-accented leader Lord John Whorfin (John Lithgow, Raising Cain).  

    Bodaciously bizarre and quirky as can be, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension is a cinematic odyssey of science fiction insanity coupled with rock n’ roll style and madcap extravagance.  After the exceedingly cool and brilliant Buckaroo Banzai breaks the sound barrier and travels through solid matter to return with an alien organism in tow, the enviously unhinged and incarcerated Dr. Emilio Lizardo, whose failed experiment into the 8th dimension from years past, caused his mind to be consumed by the wicked Lord John Whorfin prompts the physicist to spring himself from the looney bin to snatch Banzai’s working invention.  As leader of the martian-esque Red Lectroids who operate under human disguises, Whorfin seeks to overthrow their nemeses, the Black Lectroids, reclaim their home Planet 10 and annihilate Earth.  Respected for his brains and beloved for his rockin’ six-string skills, global hero Buckaroo Banzai, joined by his loyal comrades The Hong Kong Cavaliers and a peaceful Black Lectroid with Jamaican flavor, stand in Whorfin’s path of inter-dimensional dominance.  After falling for his former flame’s twin sister, Whorfin’s abduction of the blonde barfly makes Banzai’s protection of the great state of New Jersey and the rest of the planet extremely personal and chaotically action-packed.

    An otherworldly product of its time, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension abolishes standard categorization, thriving on its unusual tone, skyrocketingly over the top performances and colorfully cooky inclusions of space aliens, scientific jargon and Star Peter Weller successfully pulling off blindingly red framed eyeglasses and bowties in his mission to save mankind.  Further complimented by appearances from Clancy Brown (The Shawshank Redemption) as Banzai’s piano playing lieutenant and Jeff Goldblum (Jurassic Park) hamming it up in a cowboy outfit, the film’s villainous trio including, the brilliant John Lithgow, Christopher Lloyd (Who Framed Roger Rabbit) and Vincent Schiavelli (Batman Returns) are a trifecta of planet invading fun.  While the film appropriately arrives with no adherence to any one genre, Banzai’s head over heels interest in his late wife’s literal doppelgänger (Ellen Barkin, Sea of Love) and determination to rescue her feels forced and largely underdeveloped.  Promising a sequel that would never come to pass, a scatterbrained marketing campaign and a difficult to peg plot left the eccentric effort lost at the box-office.  With repeat viewings sometimes necessary to fully embrace its full absurdity, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension would rightfully explode into the cult charmer that it is.  Tuned with a dizzyingly catchy synth score from Composer Michael Boddicker (Get Crazy), The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension is understatedly unlike most pictures.  Akin to a wild and crazy improvisational guitar solo, this little bit of everything feature easily ranks as one of the 80s most bonkers times put to celluloid.

    Shout Select presents The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.35:1 aspect ratio.  Looking notably clean and absent of age-related damage, skin tones are exceptionally natural and well-detailed while, bold and softer colors alike burst in every frame.  In addition, black levels boast welcome inkiness with beautiful natural film grain apparent throughout.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is crisp and easily heard while, Banzai’s brief rock club gig and Composer Michael Boddicker’s equally satisfying score shake things up nicely.  In addition, an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix has also been included.  Kicking off the Blu-ray disc, supplements include, an Audio Commentary with Director W.D. Richter & Writer Earl Mac Rauch plus, a second Audio Commentary with Michael & Denise Okuda.  Unquestionably, the true gem of the release is the newly produced Into the 8th Dimension (2:08:16).  This exhaustive eight part featurette covers the origins, visual effects, casting, design work and many other aspects of the film and its lukewarm release before its acceptance as a cult classic.  With insight from Director W.D. Richter, Producer Neil Canton, Stars Peter Weller, John Lithgow, Christopher Lloyd, Clancy Brown, Composer Michael Boddicker and countless others, this first-rate achievement from Producer Brian Ward is the holy grail for Buckaroo devotees.  

    Presented in standard definition on its DVD counterpart, additional special features consist of the vintage making-of featurette Buckaroo Banzai Declassified (22:41), an Alternate Opening (7:12), 14 Deleted Scenes (14:11), the New Jet Car Trailer (2:25) and the Theatrical Trailer (1:17).  Lastly, in addition to Paul Shipper’s top-notch new design work, the Reversible Cover Art hosts the film’s original 1-sheet imagery.

    Fun, flashy and enjoyably insane, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension has always been an acquired taste for many, leaving others perplexed by its inter dimensional zaniness.  A one of a kind original, W.D. Richter’s sole directorial effort concocts a sloppy joe of genre touches with an eclectic cast having the time of their lives facing off against reptilian spacemen with oddball tech, ingenuity and the power of rock n’ roll as their tools of defense.  For the inaugural release of Shout! Factory’s film fan driven Shout Select line, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension Collector’s Edition blasts to soaring heights with its virtually flawless presentation and jaw-droppingly impressive special features that have raised the bar in terms of fan service and definitive documentation.  

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available August 16th from Shout Select, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Silk Stockings (1957) Blu-ray Review

    Silk Stockings (1957)

    Director: Rouben Mamoulian 

    Starring: Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse, Janis Paige, Peter Lorre, Jules Munshin, George Tobias & Joseph Buloff

    Released by: Warner Archive

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Assigned to retrieve her comrades from the seduction of Paris, Silk Stockings finds brass Soviet operative Ninotchka Yoshenka (Cyd Charisse, Party Girl) meeting her match in the form of American film producer Steve Canfield (Fred Astaire, Holiday Inn).  Bewitched by Ninotchka’s beauty and revealing personality, the abiding Russian slowly finds herself wrapped up in the finer things the city of love has to offer.  Janis Paige (Please Don’t Eat the Daisies), Peter Lorre (The Maltese Falcon), Jules Munshin (On the Town), George Tobias (Yankee Doodle Dandy) and Joseph Buloff (Somebody Up There Likes Me) co-star.

    Adapted from the Broadway stage show based on the 1939 film Ninotchka, The Band Wagon combo of Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse re-team for this song and dance mashup produced during the waining days of MGM’s musical pictures.  After signing noted Russian composer Peter Illyich Boroff to lend his talents to his latest feature, jovial American producer Steve Canfield hits a minor snag when three dimwitted Soviet soldiers (Lorre, Munshin and Buloff respectively) arrive in Paris to retrieve their fellow citizen.  Using the pleasures and luxuries of the city to his advantage, Canfield easily corrupts the blokes to embrace their new environment only to have hard-nosed female solider Ninotchka Yoshenka ordered to collect her more easily corruptible comrades.  While falsifying reasons to allow Boroff to remain in Paris, Steve finds himself falling for the ultra serious Ninotchka after breaking down the concrete barriers of her politically brainwashed personality to discover a girl embracing love and excitement for the first time.  Dancing his way into her heart and boldly proposing marriage, Steve’s alterations to Boroff’s protective tunes insults the composer and the love his life to return to Moscow promptly.  Separated by the Cold War and the near inability to enter Ninotchka’s snowy home country, Steve gets crafty to ensure his love is not lost forever.

    Aged 57 at the time of its making, Fred Astaire brings his youthful energy and dynamite dancing skills to the forefront in several notable numbers including, his impressive top hat wearing grand finale while, the majority of the film’s musical tunes lack pizazz.  Beautifully shot in lively CinemaScope, Silk Stockings handsomely boasts its theatricality with colorful costume touches and impressive choreography that unfortunately only comes alive sporadically.  Marking Director Rouben Mamoulian’s (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Mark of Zorro) final film before permanently returning to Broadway, Silk Stockings not only failed to be a rousing financial success but, would also mark Astaire’s final musical for the lion-roaring studio.  Lending comical levity courtesy of Lorre, Munshin and Buloff's combined performances, Silk Stockings narrative of opposites attracting may appear largely passé yet, the romantic chemistry between Astaire and Charisse makes the film a modest charmer.

    Warner Archive presents Silk Stockings with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Arriving stunningly filmic, skin tones are most impressive while, the dazzling gowns and other show-stopping outfits of the film pop with divine bursts of color.  Another handsome transfer overseen by the film-loving folks at Warner Archive, Silk Stockings’ appearance is cause for tabletop dancing.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is thoroughly crisp whereas the film’s musical numbers offer increased depth and an appreciatively lively push.  With no static or pops detected, the track nicely compliments its impressive visual counterpart.  Ported over from its previous DVD release, special features include, Cole Porter in Hollywood: Satin and Silk (10:15), a brisk yet informative overview of the production’s making hosted by co-star Cyd Charisse, the 1934 short film Paree, Paree (20:53) starring Dorothy Stone and Bob Hope, the Alfred Wallenstein conducted symphony short Poet and Peasant Overture (9:07) from 1955 and the film’s Theatrical Trailer (2:57).

    While in no great shakes one of MGM’s best musicals, Silk Stockings remains a lovely showcase for its stars’ onscreen chemistry and the stylistic chops of Astaire’s effortless dancing abilities.  Capturing moments of genuine greatness, Silk Stockings stumbles to maintain its momentum throughout its entirety.  Lighthearted and visually sharp, Warner Archive succeeds in promoting the film to high-definition perfection with a solid-sounding mix and vintage supplements including, two musical shorts that will make viewers happily swing and flip.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Warner Archive, Silk Stockings can be purchased via WBShop.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • The Crush (1993) Blu-ray Review

    The Crush (1993)

    Director: Alan Shapiro

    Starring: Carly Elwes, Alicia Silverstone, Jennifer Rubin & Kurtwood Smith

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Forbidden love and obsession reign supreme in The Crush when writer Nick Eliot (Cary Elwes, Saw) catches the attention of his landlady’s young daughter Adrian (Alicia Silverstone, Clueless).  After respectfully being turned down by her older crush, Adrian will stop at nothing to turn Nick’s life into a living nightmare.  Jennifer Rubin (A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors) and Kurtwood Smith (RoboCop) co-star.

    In the vein of Fatal Attraction, The Crush caters its tale of scandalous romance and unsettling revenge for a teenage demographic with many landing their own crush for young star Alicia Silverstone in her breakout performance.  Wise beyond her years, 14-year-old Adrian falls head over heels for houseguest occupant Nick whose flattery and ultimate rejection of the teen beauty alters his life for the worse.  Intruding on his personal space before forcefully kissing her wishful beau, Adrian’s persistence after being shunned takes a darker turn when Nick’s blossoming writing career is jeopardized, his car vandalized and his new girlfriend (Rubin) is hospitalized.  Fearing for his life and unable to escape from Adrian’s hold, Nick is delivered a devastating blow when the menacing minor accuses him of sexual assault, potentially destroying the writer’s life.  With fleeting options and publicly viewed as guilty, Nick’s efforts to definitively break his crush’s heart and clear his own name can only come at a violent cost.  Earning the former Aerosmith music video starlet two MTV Movie Award’s including Best Villain, The Crush may be best and rightly remembered for Silverstone’s seductively skitzo performance while, the true story inspired narrative does admirable work maintaining suspense throughout its rather violently tame plot.  Enjoyably simplistic with evenly applied thrills, The Crush sits handsomely next to other psychotic lovesick pictures of the era with Gen Xers’ nostalgia-fueled appreciation earning its cult credibility.

    Marking its Blu-ray debut, Scream Factory proudly presents The Crush with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Appearing clear and particularly lush in the green surroundings of the film’s central location, colors are strongly reproduced with skin tones always looking natural.  Lacking any overwhelming instances of dirt or debris, black levels are satisfactory while, its presentation is filmic and exceedingly pleasing to the eye.  Presented with a disclaimer alerting viewers of phasing issues present on previous releases that have been unfortunately carried over due to lack of better materials, the film’s DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix suffers only mildly with dialogue registering slightly lower yet, audibly than anticipated.  Far from deal-breaking and with expectations appropriately adjusted, the mix is perfectly sufficient.  An optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix with identical phasing issues is also included.  Meanwhile, special features include, a newly recorded Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Alan Shapiro, moderated by Nathaniel Thompson.  In addition, The Doting Father with Kurtwood Smith (9:59) finds the former That ‘70s Show star reminiscing on his brief but, enjoyable experience on the film, praising its cinematography and recalling Silverstone’s 16th birthday celebration on set.  Furthermore, Stung by Love with Jennifer Rubin (13:19) catches up with the genre appreciated actress as she discusses how her modeling days and handiness with a camera aided her performance on top of praising the acting abilities of co-stars Elwes and Silverstone.  Finally, the film’s Theatrical Trailer (2:03) and TV Spot (0:17) conclude the disc’s supplemental offerings.

    A seductive thriller fashioned for the MTV generation, The Crush’s greatest claim to fame remains its cinematic introduction to Silverstone who steals the show with her unhinged performance as a lovestruck teen gone psycho.  With an equally strong performance from Elwes, The Crush delivers its taste of suspense commendably, making it a worthy date night thriller.  Rewinding back to the days when UB40 and “Informer” blared across the radio waves, Scream Factory’s high-definition presentation and compact bonus features treats diehard fans with a cult favorite unworthy of breaking up with.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available June 21st from Scream Factory, The Crush can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Suspicion (1941) Blu-ray Review

    Suspicion (1941)

    Director: Alfred Hitchcock

    Starring: Cary Grant, Joan Fontaine, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Nigel Bruce & Dame May Whitty

    Released by: Warner Archive

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From Master of Suspense Alfred Hitchcock (The Man Who Knew Too Much, Strangers on a Train), Suspicion stars Joan Fontaine (Rebecca) as bookish Lina McLaidlaw who’s swept off her feet by the dashing Johnnie Aysgarth (Cary Grant, North by Northwest).  Overwhelmed with affection and married hastily, Lina slowly learns the truths of her new husband’s dishonesty and potentially murderous agenda with the newlywed fearing she may be his next victim.  Sir Cedric Hardwicke (The Ten Commandments), Nigel Bruce (Limelight) and Dame May Whitty (Mrs. Miniver) co-star.

    Adapted from Anthony Berkeley’s (under the pseudonym Francis Illes) novel Before the Fact, Suspicion presents a romantically conceived tale, tensely elevated to soaring heights as a girl in love suspects her one and only is out for blood.  Playing against type, the charismatic Cary Grant slides his way into frame as the worry-free and financially irresponsible Johnnie Aysgarth whose good looks and fast talk only take him so far when shards of his true self are slowly revealed to his hopelessly in love new bride Lina (Fontaine).  Moving into a mammoth estate, Lina learns that not only is Johnnie jobless but gets by routinely borrowing large sums of money in order to gamble his way into actual fortunes that never last.  In order to put his wife’s worries at bay, Johnnie takes employment with his cousin as his loveably buffoonish buddy Beaky (Bruce) visits the couple and innocently informs Lina of Johnnie’s untruthful way with words.  Before long and without Johnnie’s knowledge, Lina learns of his job loss due to embezzlement of funds shortly before a family tragedy strikes.  While Lina grieves over the loss of her father, Johnnie grows frustrated at their dismal inheritance leading a real estate opportunity to bloom with Beaky.  As lies and deceit mount in the wake of yet another questionable death, Lina begins to suspect her husband will do anything to stay financially stable… even murder.

    Rightly earning Joan Fontaine an Academy Award for the only Hitchcock lensed performance to earn such an honor, Suspicion is gracefully directed with Grant and Fontaine’s irresistible love story warming viewers’ hearts.  While Johnnie consistently lies and increasing disappoints Lina, Grant’s wit and obvious infatuation with his onscreen wife make his wrongs forgivable.  Shifting its tone to a tensely orchestrated thriller, Johnnie’s obsession with mystery novels and untraceable poisons convinces Lina that her next glass of milk may be her last.  Rattled by nerves and a heart-pounding, high speed car sequence in its waning moments, Suspicion throws itself through the windshield with a wholly underwhelming conclusion that preaches the cons of wrongly suspecting others instead of delivering a gutsier conclusion found in its original source material.  While its ending may be uneventful, Suspicion captures a cocktail of effective atmosphere, sound performances from its leads and remains as technically polished as anything helmed by Hitchcock during this era.

    Presented in 1080p, screened in its 1.37:1 aspect ratio, Suspicion looks sumptuous with deep blacks and natural grain permeating its runtime.  While the lavish settings and intricacies of set pieces including, Lina’s heirloom chairs, appear nicely detailed, textures in costume choices and the film’s monochrome photography are beautifully communicated.  Accompanied with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is wonderfully handled with any signs of crackling distortion absent.  With the exception of Franz Waxman’s (Stalag 17) evocatively simple score, the track is rather simple in its range but, handsomely treated.  Furthermore, special features include, Before the Fact: Suspicious Hitchcock (21:36) which offers a valuable critical analysis of the feature with insight from Author Bill Krohn, Film Historian Robert Osbourne, Filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich and others while, the film’s Theatrical Trailer (1:41) rounds out the supplements.

    In a particularly marvelous decade for the auteur, Alfred Hitchcock’s Suspicion, although suffering from a rather dull finale, ranks highly for its genre blending prowess and award winning turn by Fontaine.  Masterfully restored, Warner Archive treats another of cinema’s greats with the expected quality and care film enthusiasts have come to expect.  

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Warner Archive, Suspicion can be purchased via WBShop.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Susan Slept Here (1954) Blu-ray Review

    Susan Slept Here (1954)

    Director: Frank Tashlin

    Starring: Dick Powell, Debbie Reynolds, Anne Francis, Alvy Moore & Glenda Farrell

    Released by: Warner Archive

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    When Oscar winning screenwriter Mark Christopher (Dick Powell, Murder, My Sweet) is overcome with writer’s block, unexpected inspiration arrives in the form of a 17-year-old delinquent (Debbie Reynolds, Singin’ in the Rain).  In order to save her from a Christmas behind bars, Mark does the unthinkable and marries the teen with intentions of annulling the affair when she turns of age.  Uncertain whether she wants to be the ex-Mrs. Christopher, Susan Slept Here delivers comical hijinks in a tale of possibly mismatched love.  Anne Francis (Forbidden Planet), Alvy Moore (Green Acres) and Glenda Farrell (Little Caesar) co-star.

    Based on the play by Steve Fisher and Alex Gottlieb with the latter contributing the film’s screenplay, Susan Slept Here is a romantic comedy of taboo sized proportion by today’s standards.  Starring in not only his final film performance before leading a successful television career but, also his only feature photographed in color, Dick Powell appears as acclaimed yet, stumbling screenwriter Mark Christopher whose detective pal unloads teenage hooligan Susan Landis (Reynolds) with him in order to pull Mark out of his creative rut.  Against his better judgement, Mark takes the underage beauty in only to be met with understandable confusion and rage from his dynamite fiancée and actress Isabelle Alexander (Francis).  Although Mark’s best buddy Virgil (Moore), in a role originally considered for Mickey Rooney, and his loyal secretary Maude (Farrell) try to keep a lid on the scandalous situation, the harsh reality of Susan likely spending her remaining days in juvenile detention until her 18th birthday prompts the sympathetic screenwriter to scurry to Las Vegas with Susan for a shotgun wedding.  Originally joined together to showcase Susan’s status as an upstanding citizen, true feelings develop as Mark hastily retreats to the mountains to put pen to paper on his new script, based on his own very unusual situation.  Refusing to sign annulment papers while, Mark’s own uncertainty about their age difference subsides, a chance at true love may still be imminent for the odd couple.

    Helmed by former animation director Frank Tashlin (Artists and Models) whose kinetic energy crafting toons is evident in his live-action output, Susan Slept Here’s charm lies heavily in the adorable bubbly personality of Reynolds whose alluring looks and sense of humor make indelible impressions on viewers and her elder beau.  Cheekily narrated, in quite possibly a cinema first, by an Oscar statuette while, graciously being nominated twice for Best Music, Original Song and Best Sound Recording, Susan Slept Here plays its once controversial premise with sheer heart and tastefully romantic notions.  Topped with a late musical-fantasy sequence bursting with exuberant colors, Susan Slept Here may be wired formulaically but, makes for breezy, light-hearted entertainment from simpler times.

    Warner Archive presents Susan Slept Here with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.66:1 aspect ratio.  From RKO Pictures’ hot pink opening logo to the film’s glowing skin tones, the vibrant Technicolor photography is ushered in with warm detail and exceptional, natural grain levels.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, the film’s opening song debuts with a strong, if not slightly sharp, presence before relaying crystal clear dialogue, free of cracks or other observable distortion.  Lastly, the only supplement included is the film’s Trailer (2:17).

    Released to modest success before then studio head Howard Hughes sold off RKO Pictures, Susan Slept Here is a warmly conceived rom-com for a rather head-turning love story.  Reynolds’ youthful exuberance and remarkable beauty matched with Powell’s tender performance makes his feature film finale an endearing one alongside Reynolds’ rising stardom.  Meanwhile, Warner Archive welcomes the Hollywood set charmer with an outstanding hi-def treatment, making sharing a bed with the hearty picture a pleasure.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available April 19th from Warner Archive, Susan Slept Here can be purchased via WBShop.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Key Largo (1948) Blu-ray Review

    Key Largo (1948)

    Director: John Huston

    Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson, Lauren Bacall, Lionel Barrymore, Claire Trevor, Thomas Gomez & John Rodney

    Released by: Warner Archive

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set off the coast of Florida, Key Largo finds mob boss Johnny Rocco (Edward G. Robinson, Little Caesar) and his gang holing up in a local hotel with its owner Nora Temple (Lauren Bacall, Dark Passage), her disabled father-in-law (Lionel Barrymore, Grand Hotel) and ex-Major Frank McCloud (Humphrey Bogart, Casablanca) at their mercy.  Bracing themselves for a detrimental hurricane while keeping Rocco at bay, McCloud, overwhelmed by his wartime experiences, may be their only hope in surviving the ordeal.  Claire Trevor (Murder, My Sweet), Thomas Gomez (Force of Evil) and John Rodney (Pursued) co-star in Director John Huston’s (The Maltese Falcon) esteemed classic.

    In their concluding feature together, real-life married couple Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall continue to solidify their onscreen personas as one of Hollywood’s most beloved pairings.  Adapted from Maxwell Anderson’s popular play although sharing little in common, Key Largo finds Major Frank McCloud (Bogart) visiting the widow and father of his deceased fellow soldier at their beachside resort Hotel Largo.  A virtual ghost town with the exception of several snappily-dressed gentleman and an overly drunk woman, Frank is quickly embraced by his hosts only to grow suspicious of the hotel’s other patrons.  With a violent storm approaching, preparations are quickly made when another mysterious guest previously confined to his room reveals himself to be none other than notorious gangster Johnny Rocco (Robinson).  Drawing their guns, Rocco and his cronies forcefully take control of the hotel while awaiting the arrival of their associates to conclude a lucrative deal.  As weather conditions worsen, the intensity and suspense amongst the trapped trio and their captors increases at every turn.  Personalities clash and egos are tested while, Rocco struggles to maintain control of his unpredictable situation.  Using Nora and her father-in-law as pawns to force Frank into chauffeuring the gang back to Cuba for their great escape, a climactic showdown ensues that only the former Major can take control of if willing.

    Ruggedly good-looking and oozing with charisma, Bogart chalks up another hard-nosed performance, fittingly contrasting to that of his off-screen’s better half.  Although predominately playing the frightened female of the picture, Bacall conveys ample emotion throughout with her hypnotically gorgeous eyes saying so much.  In addition, Edward G. Robinson admirably plays the cigar-chomping heel that audiences have come to love while, the severely arthritic Lionel Barrymore, afflicted with intolerable pain at the time, uses his real-life condition to the advantage of his wonderful performance.  Furthermore, Claire Trevor’s turn as Rocco’s alcoholic rag doll Gaye Dawn is the film’s standout.  Constantly slurring her speech and suffering from shaky withdrawals, Trevor’s agonizing pleas for a drink and willingness to embarrass herself by pathetically singing for a sip is magnetically heart-wrenching and deservedly earned her the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.  Houston’s gripping direction and razor-tense tone easily accounts for the film’s timeless appreciation and appropriate proclamation as one of the director’s best.

    Warner Archive presents Key Largo with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.37:1 aspect ratio.  Outside of mild water stained markings in the film’s establishing shots, the black and white photography is astoundingly gorgeous with rich detail conveyed in faces and perspiration on actors easily identified.  In addition, contrast is sharp with shadowy moments excellently balanced against sunnier sequences.  Finally, black levels are deep and solidly inky making this filmic transfer worthy of its praise.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is appropriately handled and always audible with intrusive hiss or static unnoticed.  Crashing waves, violent winds and gunshots are effectively forceful, leaving little to no room for disappointment.  The sole special feature included is the film’s Theatrical Trailer (2:24).

    Bogart and Bacall once again light up the screen with their intoxicating chemistry while, Claire Trevor’s Academy Award winning performance is a stunner.  Director John Huston’s noirish exploration of the Florida keys engulfed by seedy characters and a fatal storm makes the journey to Key Largo one viewers will never want to see end.  In addition, Warner Archive handsomely salutes this cinematic gem with a transfer worthy of its stature although, special features unfortunately fall on the shallow side.  

    RATING: 4/5

    Available February 23rd from Warner Archive, Key Largo can be purchased via WBShop.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Bolero (1984) / Ghosts Can't Do It (1990) Blu-ray Review

    Bolero (1984) / Ghosts Can’t Do It (1990)

    Director: John Derek

    Starring: Bo Derek, George Kennedy, Andrea Occhipinti, Ana Obregon & Olivia d’Abo / Bo Derek, Anthony Quinn, Don Murray & Julie Newmar 

    Released by: Shout! Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Starring striking beauty Bo Derek (10), Shout! Factory proudly presents a double feature of the sex symbol’s steamiest features!  In Bolero, Derek stars as a curious graduate who intends to discover her womanhood during a journey to the world’s most exotic locations.  George Kennedy (Cool Hand Luke), Andrea Occhipinti (The New York Ripper), Ana Obregon (The Gamble) and Olivia d’Abo (The Wonder Years) co-star.  Next up, Ghosts Can’t Do It centers on happily married couple Katie (Derek) and Scott (Anthony Quinn, Lust for Life) who despite their age difference, lead a fulfilling life.  After coming to terms with her husband’s death, Katie reconnects with Scott’s impatient ghost as she scours the globe for a suitable body for him to be reincarnated in.  Don Murray (Bus Stop) and Julie Newmar (Batman) co-star.  

    Helmed by her late husband John Derek (Tarzan, the Ape Man), Bolero finds virginal graduate Mac MacGillvary (Derek) determined to find her ideal sexual suitor.  Following a celebratory striptease and receiving a lucrative inheritance, Mac, along with best friend Catalina (Obregon) and her faithful chauffeur Cotton (Kennedy), travel to Arabian locales to sow her wild oats only to be underwhelmed by a sleepy shiek mid-seduction.  Hightailing to Spain, Mac becomes enamored with attractive bullfighter Angel (Occhipinti) who successfully deflowers the head over heels American.  Tragedy strikes when her lover is gored, prompting Mac to oversee his full recovery in hopes of spending the rest of their lives together.  A product of the wild Cannon Films, Executive Producer Menahem Golan demanded the film’s many sex sequences be amplified much to the dismay of both Derek’s.  Hardly uncommon for the independent producing mavericks, Bolero, although technically a period piece boasting beautifully scenic locations, is quickly reduced to an exploitative sizzle reel of Derek’s fabulous nude figure.  While its erotic sequences are relatively tame by today’s standards with the uncomfortable exception of 14 year-old Olivia d’Abo appearing fully exposed in several scenes, Golan’s refusal to cut the film to meet proper ratings approval resulted in then distributor MGM to drop the feature.  Released independently, the uninspired effort spotlights Derek having honey suckled off her breasts, nude horseback riding and easily the decade’s cheesiest, fog-entrenched sex scene captured in slow-motion with a hilariously neon lit “extasy” sign in the background.  Dragged through the mud by the Razzie Awards, Bolero would unsurprisingly be nominated for Worst Picture of the Decade (only to lose to 1981’s Mommie Dearest).  Outside of its generous footage of Derek and her female co-stars in their birthday suits, Bolero lacks any true merit, only to be appreciated as a retro train wreck.

    After suffering one of the most talkative heart attacks captured on film, the elderly Scott (Quinn) recovers only to end his own life with a gunshot.  Leaving his gorgeous and much younger wife Katie (Derek) to grieve, Ghosts Can’t Do It finds Scott’s spirit returning to comfort and guide her on a quest for a young body to be reborn into.  Living off the luxuries of Scott’s $2 billion wealth, Katie travels to tropical locales for some fun in the sun while, juggling the responsibilities of Scott’s valued company with assistance from the recently deceased.  In what would be their final creative collaboration between the Derek’s, Ghosts Can’t Do It is a painfully dreadful romcom with a fantasy flair that fails on all levels.  Never shy to shed some skin, Bo Derek’s looks do little to save this turkey from would ultimately be crowned Worst Picture of 1990 by the Golden Raspberry Awards.  With an eye-rolling cameo from The Apprentice star and presidential candidate Donald Trump, Ghosts Can’t Do It never achieves a laugh and dawdles for much of its runtime in a longwinded search for Scott’s ideal body.  Signaling the last headlining appearance by the blue-eyed beauty, Ghosts Can’t Do It is a horrendous effort deserving to rest in peace for all eternity.         

    Shout! Factory presents both films in 1080p, with 1.85:1 (Bolero) and 1.78:1 (Ghosts Can’t Do It) aspect ratios respectively.  Possessing moderate levels of flakes and speckles, Bolero’s skin tones waver from warmly detailed to taking on softer appearances.  Meanwhile, exterior footage of the Moroccan environment, textures in wardrobe and the film’s many horses appears lush while, black levels are so-so.  In its spirited co-feature, picture quality is superior with no intrusive anomalies on display and more consistently accurate skin tones present.  In addition, colors of Derek’s bright ensembles pop magnificently under the film’s sunny climates.  Equipped with DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mixes, dialogue in both films are well-handled with nothing lost in translation while, scoring moments are adequately stacked.  Special features include, a Bolero Trailer (2:36) and a Ghosts Can’t Do It Trailer (2:48).

    The magnetic allure of Bo Derek can hardly be overstated with her two starring efforts in this collection prioritizing her outstanding figure.  Although both films are a barrel of disappointment, Bolero can be mildly appreciated for the exploitative influence of Cannon Films while, Ghosts Can’t Do It is an abysmally unfunny feature best forgotten.  Arriving with only their trailers attached, Shout! Factory gives both films commendable high-definition upgrades, ensuring that one fan’s trash can be another’s treasure.

    RATING: 2/5

    Available now from Shout! Factory, Bolero / Ghosts Can’t Do It can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) Blu-ray Review

    The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015)

    Director: Marielle Heller

    Starring: Bey Powley, Alexander Skarsgård, Christopher Meloni & Kristen Wiig

    Released by: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on the novel by Phoebe Gloeckner, The Diary of a Teenage Girl centers on 15-year-old Minnie Goetze (Bey Powley, Equals) at the peak of her sexual awakening.  Longing for love and acceptance, Minnie engages in a secret affair with her mother’s boyfriend while attempting to make sense of the turbulent world around her.  Alexander Skarsgård (True Blood), Christopher Meloni (Law & Order: Special Victims Unit) and Kristen Wiig (The Skeleton Twins) co-star.

    Marking the directorial debut of Marielle Heller following her stage adaptation of the same novel, The Diary of a Teenage Girl is an oftentimes scandalous yet, never judgmental portrait of the hardships of teen culture.  Set in the free-spirited 70s of San Francisco, aspiring cartoonist and increasingly hormonal teen Minnie Goetze (Powley) finds herself yearning for connection only to find it in the unlikeliest of persons.  Following a drunken night of laughs, Minnie willingly loses her virginity to her mother’s boyfriend Monroe Rutherford (Skarsgård), jumpstarting an infatuation that neither can resist.  Exploring her newfound sexuality, Minnie embraces her elder partner at every opportunity while experimenting with other teenage curiosities.  Dabbling with drugs and attracting the attention of other boys, Minnie documents her evolution by recording diary cassettes and allowing her thoughts to visually paint pictures of Bakshi-esque animation.  From shy and introverted to eccentric and heartbreaking, Bey Powley is remarkable, encapsulating the confused and emotionally disoriented feelings common to teen survival.  In addition, Alexander Skarsgård proves equally exceptional in a performance that is both layered and complex.  Although appearing less frequently than her co-stars, Kristen Wiig is the film’s cherry on top playing a progressive mother, indulging in the hard-partying culture while the unfathomable takes place behind her back.

    Beautifully honest and channeling the essence of other female driven, coming-of-age tales including Little Darlings and Foxes, The Diary of a Teenage Girl wears its heart on its sleeve, allowing viewers to recall their own teenage insecurities with humor and warmth.  Heller’s acute detail in realizing a bygone San Francisco and pulling the mesmerizing performances from her cast makes the rookie filmmaker one to pay close mind to.  Although told from the female perspective, The Diary of a Teenage Girl transcends sexes and relates to every teenager’s spinning world of emotions, earning itself worthy praise as one of the most memorable films of its ilk in recent years.

    Sony Pictures Home Entertainment presents The Diary of a Teenage Girl with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Adhering to softer tones to capture its intended time period, detail remains crisp with skin tones appearing natural and lifelike.  Textures in costume choices are pleasing while, the color palette of the San Francisco streets and Minnie’s apartment are attractive.  In addition, the film’s brief animation moments pop most pleasingly with wonderful richness.  Meanwhile, dimmer moments with 70s era lamps lighting the way cause backgrounds to appear occasionally muddy but never overpower said scenes.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is appropriately prioritized in this character driven effort while, the film’s choice cuts from such leading acts as The Stooges, T. Rex and Heart provide nicely balanced gains further complimenting the track.  Special features include, an Audio Commentary with Director Marielle Heller and Actors Bel Powley & Alexander Skarsgård, Deleted Scenes (5:24) exclusive to Blu-ray, Marielle’s Journey: Bringing the Diary to Life (23:07) exploring Heller’s passion for the project that began as a stage play before boldly taking on the task to adapting it for film.  In addition, an LA Film Festival Q&A with Marielle Heller, Alexander Skarsgård and Bel Powley (25:19), the Theatrical Trailer (1:48) and Previews for Irrational Man (2:11), Jimmy’s Hall (2:20), Infinitely Polar Bear (2:23), Truth (2:12), Grandma (2:12) and Labyrinth of Lies (2:01).  Finally, a Digital HD Code has also been provided.

    Deeply personal yet, universally relatable, The Diary of a Teenage Girl is one of the finest coming-of-age efforts of the decade with its candid exploration of the teenage spirit.  An emotional rollercoaster packed with laughs and pain, Marielle Heller’s first outing behind the camera is an exemplary debut with a career destined for greatness.  Furthermore, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment bestows top-notch technical grades on its release with a sizable supplemental package worthy of indulging.  

    RATING: 4/5

    Available January 19th from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, The Diary of a Teenage Girl can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers. 

  • Cinderella (2015) Blu-ray Review

    Cinderella (2015)

    Director: Kenneth Branagh

    Starring: Lily James, Cate Blanchett, Richard Madden, Stellan Skarsgård & Helena Bonham Carter

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on the timeless fairy tale, Cinderella centers on kind-hearted Ella (Lily James, Downton Abbey) whose world is turned upside down following the passing of her father.  Reduced to the equivalent of a servant by her cruel stepmother and her dimwitted daughters, a chance encounter with the prince and a touch of magic restores hope to the enchanting young lady’s life.  Cate Blanchett (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), Richard Madden (Game of Thrones), Stellan Skarsgård (Thor) and Helena Bonham Carter (Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street) co-star.

    In the successful wake of Alice in Wonderland and Maleficent, Disney reaches new heights with their latest live-action revisionist tale of Cinderella.  Providing slightly more background on its title character than its 1950 animated counterpart, a young Ella is seen surrounded by her loving parents and picturesque household.  In a brief but charming appearance, Hayley Atwell (Agent Carter) as Cinderella’s mother urges her daughter to keep courage and kindness forever in her heart as she lie on her deathbed.  As years pass and Ella’s father learns to love anew, Lady Tremaine (Blanchett) and her two gaudy daughters move in, bringing with them a noticeable coldness towards Ella.  Away on business and falling ill, Ella’s father tragically passes away leaving his only daughter in the trenches of the now widowed Lady Tremaine.  Unloading an unspeakable wave of cruelty on her stepdaughter, Ella becomes the sole servant of the household, forced to wait on her wicked stepmother and selfish stepsisters.  Maintaining her promise to her late mother, Ella attempts to keep her spirits high while caring for friendly mice and always thinking of others first.  Overwhelmed with taunts by her new family leads Ella to a chance encounter with a dashing prince, known only as Kit (Madden).  Enraptured by her presence and urged by his father to wed a princess, Kit vows to see her again by inviting all citizens to the royal ball.  With the assistance of her magical Fairy Godmother (Bonham Carter), the newly nicknamed Cinderella enjoys a romantic evening with Kit, solidifying their love for one another.  With her royal-like appearance available for so long and fearing Kit’s reaction to her peasant status, Cinderella flees the castle as the definitive search for the prince’s true love unfolds.

    Beautifully realized, Director Kenneth Branagh’s captivating adaptation takes the simplistic fairy tale and enriches its narrative with majesty and rich visual grandeur.  Perfectly selected, Lily James casts a spell on viewers with her dizzying elegance as Cinderella while Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett offers humanizing new depth to the detestable Lady Tremaine.  Complimented by lush costume design by Sandy Powell (Shakespeare in Love, The Aviator) and gorgeous production design by Dante Ferretti (Gangs of New York, Hugo), Cinderella is the nearest example of a fairy tale come true.  Abundantly faithful to its animated predecessor, Cinderella manages to weave its own identity that can safely be praised and cherished as Disney’s finest reimagining to date.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Cinderella with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.39:1 aspect ratio.  Much like its protagonist, picture quality is perfect in virtually every way.  Skin tones are warm and inviting while, the wide spectrum of colors found in costumes, most noticeably in Cinderella’s sparkling blue gown, pop beautifully.  Meanwhile, detail from settings to computer-generated creations are crisp with black levels always appearing deep and inky.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is flawless while more intense moments involving horseback chases and Composer Patrick Doyle’s (Brave) rousing score gives listeners a most exceptional soundscape.  Special features include, A Fairy Tale Comes to Life (9:23) where key talent including Producer Simon Kinberg, Director Kenneth Branagh, Screenwriter Chris Weitz and the cast discuss the impact of the timeless tale and the opportunities their adaptation has to add to its legacy.  In addition, Costume Test Fun (2:39), Staging the Ball (11:27), where the various creative departments discuss their roles in realizing the film’s key sequence, an Alternate Opening: Ella’s Childhood (3:02), Ella’s Fury Friends (3:43) and Frozen Fever (7:56), the Frozen inspired short film attached to the film during its theatrical release are also included.  Finally, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Disney Parks (1:02), Once Upon A Time (0:31), Monkey Kingdom (1:02), Born in China (1:14) and Inside Out (1:27) round out the supplements while, a DVD edition of the film and Digital HD Code also accompany the release.

    Bursting with magic and whimsy, Cinderella, while adjusting minor components, pays homage to Disney’s iconic animated masterpiece to deliver an even finer film.  Masterfully casted and beautifully designed, Disney’s latest live-action redo is a splendid accomplishment that will leave viewers entranced.  Exceptional looking with a vigorous sound mix, Cinderella sparkles in high-definition confidently leaving viewers of all ages happily ever after.

    RATING: 5/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Cinderella can be purchased via Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • The Facts of Life (1960) Blu-ray Review

    The Facts of Life (1960)

    Director: Melvin Frank

    Starring: Bob Hope, Lucille Ball, Don Defore & Ruth Hussey

    Released by: Olive Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From the director of White Christmas, The Facts of Life centers on longtime friends and polar opposites Larry Gilbert (Bob Hope, Some Like It Hot) and Kitty Weaver (Lucille Ball, I Love Lucy).  When their spouses are unable to join them on a planned getaway to Acapulco, the two find themselves enraptured with their surroundings and eventually each other.  As their magical vacation comes to close, Larry and Kitty must wrestle with their guilt and love for each other as they decide their fate.  Don Defore (Hazel), Ruth Hussey (The Uninvited), Philip Ober (North by Northwest) and Marianne Stewart (Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte) co-star.

    Following their previous collaborations on Sorrowful Jones and Fancy Pants, Bob Hope and Lucille Ball would reteam 10 years later for a romantic comedy, plagued with behind the scenes turmoil.  From Ball being knocked unconscious during filming to Director Melvin Frank breaking his ankle, Ball’s own Desilu Studios, where a percentage of filming took place, would also partially burn down.  Production woes aside, The Facts of Life details a simple story of love found in the most unexpected places.  Maintaining a typical suburban existence of raising children and spending time with the same friends, Larry Gilbert (Hope) and Kitty Weaver (Ball) sense something lacking in their personal lives that their own spouses fail to notice.  When a couples vacation to Acapulco is planned, Larry and Kitty’s spouses are unable to join leaving the two casual friends to spend the exotic getaway together.  Before long, Larry and Kitty fall madly in love with one another while celebrating their catch of a marlin and sharing romantic dinners together.  As the sun sets on their unexpected love affair, reality sets in when they return home, conflicted with guilt and overwhelmed with their undeniable attraction for each other.

    Far more romantic than comedic, The Facts of Life weaves a tale from a simpler time where married couples still slept in separate beds.  Hope and Ball’s chemistry is contagious and proves to still be sharp following a decade long hiatus.  While their developing love in Acapulco is charming enough, the inclusion of both characters having children makes their actions feel wildly selfish as opposed to simply leaving unappreciative spouses.  As Larry and Kitty attempt to continue the affair on their home turf, comical situations ensue when their local cleaning man nearly catches the couple necking at a drive-in movie.  Plus, a weekend getaway backfires due to inclement weather and a leaky roof bringing out the grouchier sides of their personalities.  After much discussion involving finances, lawyer fees and the remarriage of their spouses, the spark ignited in Acapulco begins to dim as Larry and Kitty are faced with the hard reality of their choices.  Occasionally sweet and heavy on dramatics, The Facts of Life is a heightened account of a love affair that begins earnestly but, sells itself short with an unsatisfying conclusion.  

    Olive Films presents The Facts of Life with a 1080p transfer, preserving its 1.66:1 aspect ratio.  Marking its Blu-ray debut, the film appears inherently soft with Saul Bass’ animated title sequence looking less than stellar.  Luckily, the black and white photography registers modest detail and generally strong black levels, most evident in Hope’s dark hair and countless pieces of wardrobe.  Meanwhile, the DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix relays audible, if not inconsistent, dialogue levels that sometimes require an increase in volume.  A slight hiss is detected on the mix but, never intrudes on the picture.  Expectedly, the only special feature offered is the Theatrical Trailer (2:41).

    Nominated for five Academy Awards and winning for Best Costume Design, The Facts of Life is noticeably more dramatic than past Hope/Ball collaborations while, attempting to deliver a romantic tale of forbidden love and its aftereffects.  Hope and Ball’s chemistry is intact and effective but, their motives feel too selfish to fully get behind.  In addition, their final decision regarding their newfound love feels entirely wasted and the picture suffers as a result.  Olive Films ushers the romantic dramedy onto Blu-ray with sufficient quality that is a fair upgrade from past DVD releases.  Viewers expecting a knee-slapping riot with comedic legends like Hope and Ball in the driver’s seat will be disappointed but, as a relatively grounded film on the complexities of love, The Facts of Life suffices.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Olive Films, The Facts of Life can be purchased via OliveFilms.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers. 

  • The Sure Thing (1985) 30th Anniversary Edition Blu-ray Review

    The Sure Thing (1985)

    Director: Rob Reiner

    Starring: John Cusack, Daphne Zuniga, Anthony Edwards & Viveca Lindfors

    Released by: Shout! Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    In this romantic road trip romp, The Sure Thing stars John Cusack (Say Anything...) as college freshmen Walter “Gib” Gibson.  When Gib is set up with a blonde bombshell across the country, he’s determined to make this sure thing a reality.  Joined by stuck up classmate Alison Bradbury (Daphne Zuniga, Spaceballs) via the campus ride-share program, the two opposites encounter constant obstacles as they both head to Los Angeles, forming an unexpected bond along the way.  Anthony Edwards (Revenge of the Nerds), Viveca Lindfors (Creepshow), Tim Robbins (Mystic River) and Nicollette Sheridan (Spy Hard) in her film debut, co-star.

    From Director Rob Reiner (This Is Spinal Tap), The Sure Thing is a slice of teenage romance and 80s angst, wonderfully realized by stars John Cusack and Daphne Zuniga.  Bored and underwhelmed with his luck with women at college, Walter “Gib” Gibson (Cusack) strikes gold when high school buddy Lance (Edwards) invites him to Los Angeles to meet a dream girl (Nicollete Sheridan) he’s guaranteed to strike a home run with.  Determined to head west but, short on cash, Gib hitches a ride via the campus ride program, sharing the backseat with uptight classmate Alison Bradbury (Zuniga).  Meanwhile, Tim Robbins (Howard the Duck) and Lisa Jane Persky (Peggy Sue Got Married) appear as their hilarious, show tune singing chauffeurs who eventually kick the duo to the curb following their constant arguing.  Constantly butting heads, Gib and Alison have no choice but to stick together as they hitchhike their way to Los Angeles, sharing hilarious adventures along the way.  Combatting unpleasant weather, misplacing their funds and Gib playing mad to rescue Alison from a seedy driver, the two begin to forge an unspoken attraction amidst their different personalities.  As their destination grows closer, Gib must decide whether his sure thing is worth it over his newly found feelings for Alison.

    In his first starring role, John Cusack plays typical college freshmen Walter Gibson with girls and beer taking priority over schoolwork.  Breathing life into the otherwise standard teenage role, Cusack brings a wit and humor to his character that would solidify his charm in roles to come.  In addition, Daphne Zuniga, as the brainy, no nonsense Alison Bradbury, creates wonderful chemistry with her co-star that makes viewers quickly dismiss her cocky personality before, falling in love with her much like Gib does.  With a sunny climate and bitchin‘ soundtrack from top talent including, Huey Lewis & The News, The Cars and Quiet Riot, The Sure Thing stands as a genuine 80s offering of heart and hilarity coming together.

    Shout! Factory presents The Sure Thing with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  With insignificant flakes over its opening title sequence, The Sure Thing projects natural skin tones, crisp colors and excellent detail in close-ups of key talent.  Landscapes pop most noticeably as Gib and Alison make their way west with lush greenery looking most lively.  Occasional softness is seen but, hardly a cause for alarm as the transfer retains natural grain and a generally clean picture, giving this 80s effort a solid bump on high-definition.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, The Sure Thing pushes its dialogue to the forefront with clear audio levels and soundtrack selections making an even louder appearance.  With no distortion or other audio issues prevalent, The Sure Thing sounds swell.  In addition, an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Mono mix has been included for your listening pleasure.  Celebrating its 30th anniversary, Shout! Factory graciously ports over all special features from MGM’s previous DVD release including, an Audio Commentary with Director Rob Reiner, several making of featurettes: Road to The Sure Thing (26:16), Casting The Sure Thing (7:18), Reading The Sure Thing (8:48) and Dressing The Sure Thing (8:48) and a Theatrical Trailer (2:56).  While, a newly produced interview with Reiner, Cusack or Zuniga would have been most appreciated, retaining the previous in-depth supplements is most welcome.

    Although, not an official Brat Packer, John Cusack held his own in the 1980s with notable efforts including, Better off Dead, Hot Pursuit and most famously, 1989’s Say Anything....  Comical and sweet, The Sure Thing stands as one of Cusack’s shining moments of the decade with a simple story of unexpected love, complimented by leading lady Daphne Zuniga’s lovely performance.  Honoring its 30th anniversary, Shout! Factory presents this comedy classic in wonderful fashion, allowing viewers to soak up the high-definition rays of this delightful road trip romance.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available March 24th from Shout! Factory, The Sure Thing can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Beach Blanket Bingo (1965) Blu-ray Review

    Beach Blanket Bingo (1965)

    Director: William Asher

    Starring: Frankie Avalon, Annette Funicello, Deborah Walley & John Ashley

    Released by: Olive Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Everyone’s favorite seaside couple, Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, trade in their surfboards for parachutes in Beach Blanket Bingo, the fifth installment of their popular beach party pictures.  When a skydiving publicity stunt to promote the singing career of Sugar Kane (Linda Evans, Dynasty) balloons out of control, Frankie (Avalon) is convinced to take up the dangerous hobby by fellow instructor Bonnie (Deborah Walley, Gidget Goes Hawaiian) in order to make her boyfriend Steve (John Ashley, Young Dillinger) jealous.  Much to her disapproval of Bonnie’s interest in her boyfriend, Dee Dee (Funicello) decides to test out the wild feat of free-falling as well.  Plus, series regular, Bonehead (Jody McCrea, Lady Street Fighter), finds unexpected love with a real mermaid (Marta Kristen, Lost in Space).  Harvey Lembeck (The Phil Silvers Show), Don Rickles (Casino) and Paul Lynde (The Paul Lynde Show) co-star.

    Remaining within the same campy spirit of its predecessors, Beach Blanket Bingo would mark the final starring appearance of Frankie Avalon who, with the exception of a minor role in 1965’s How to Stuff a Wild Bikini, would hang up his bathing suit until the 1987 parody Back to Beach, reuniting him once again with his beach bunny, Funicello.  Giving the waves a break, Frankie (Avalon) and Dee Dee (Funicello) take to the skies for free-falling excitement while, redheaded instructor, Bonnie (Walley), attempts to swoon Frankie in order to make her co-instructor boyfriend (Ashley) a jealous wreck.  Unsurprisingly, Frankie and Dee Dee go through the turbulent motions audiences have come to expect when a new girl strolls along hoping to steal Frankie away.  Still as gorgeous and youthful as their first picture together, Avalon and Funicello’s chemistry remains intact but, one can’t help feel there enthusiasm for the material waning.  Marking the franchise’s fifth installment in less than two years, the formula has become commonplace but, not entirely stale with the welcome return of Eric Von Zipper (Lembeck), joined by his Malibu Rat Pack gang, and Don Rickles, making his fourth appearance in the series in yet another new role enabling him the opportunity to perform stand-up material.  Well-known for its memorable cameo appearances, Beach Blanket Bingo presents the iconic Buster Keaton (having previously appeared in 1964’s Pajama Party) in another hilarious role.  At the ripe age of 70 and only a year before his passing, Keaton demonstrates remarkable energy and accomplishes the physical comedy gags the legend was best known for.

    In addition, introducing an element of fantasy to the long-running series, Bonehead (better known as Deadhead in previous installments), falls madly in love with an exotic mermaid (Kristen) allowing the loyal supporting character to act outside of his usual numskull mentality.  As the film’s antagonist, South Dakota Slim (Timothy Carey, Minnie and Moskowitz), kidnaps singer Sugar Kane (Evans), the beach gang have another dependable rumble and car chase to make the wrongs right before the closing credits.  More catchy tunes and beachside dancing along, with a notable guest appearance from the flamboyant Paul Lynde as Sugar Kane’s agent, allows Beach Blanket Bingo to charm fans who can’t get enough of Frankie and Dee Dee’s fun times under the sun.

    Olive Films presents Beach Blanket Bingo with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.35:1 aspect ratio.  Just as colorful and warm as Muscle Beach Party, the fifth installment of the franchise possesses more obvious aging artifacts in the form of specks and flakes.  In addition, skin tones, while generally strong and natural, suffer from an unusual diluted appearance in an early scene that fortunately, lasts only briefly.  Meanwhile, night sequences have a softer appearance that slightly transitions to brighter scenes without greatly disrupting the picture.  With no digital tinkering applied, Beach Blanket Bingo projects a very film quality appearance that pleases but, falls shy of Muscle Beach Party’s transfer.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Mono mix, Frankie and Dee Dee’s latest outing supplies a stronger sound mix than its transfer with clear dialogue and no dropouts to mention.  The original Theatrical Trailer (2:45) is also supplied as the sole special feature.

    The sights and sounds of Beach Blanket Bingo stray close to its established formula, making for more innocent fun with Frankie and Dee Dee.  The supporting cast of McCrea, Rickles and Lembeck supply plenty of laughs and the songs, while not quite as noteworthy as earlier efforts, do their job sufficiently.  Certainly stronger than Beach Party’s original followup, Muscle Beach Party, Beach Blanket Bingo’s inclusion of gorgeous mermaids and skydiving excitement is appreciated but, ultimately still falls in the middle of the road.  Olive Films‘ transfer projects bold colors and natural grain although, containing far more aging marks than its fellow sequel.  Relaying sound nicely and including the film’s original trailer (unfortunately, lacking on Muscle Beach Party), Beach Blanket Bingo makes a suitable leap to Blu-ray.  Rounding its final franchise laps, AIP’s fifth beach party romp is far from perfect but, makes earnest attempts to supply some worthwhile additions for Avalon’s final starring sendoff.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Olive Films, Beach Blanket Bingo can be purchased via OliveFilms.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • The Buddy Holly Story (1978) Blu-ray Review

    The Buddy Holly Story (1978)

    Director: Steve Rash

    Starring: Gary Busey, Don Stroud, Charles Martin Smith, Conrad Janis & William Jordan

    Released by: Twilight Time

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Forever changing music history and shaping the sound of rock ‘n roll, a four-eyed, snaggle-toothed Texan would electrify the world and tragically leave it just as quickly.  Oscar-nominated Gary Busey brings life to a musical genius in a performance hailed as a career highlight for the character actor.  Filled with heart and unrestrained energy, Twilight Time proudly presents The Buddy Holly Story in a limited edition 3,000 unit Blu-ray release.

    The Buddy Holly Story details the rise of rock ‘n roll legend, Buddy Holly (Busey), from his early beginnings in Lubbock, Texas to worldwide fame through the power of his music.  Brilliantly executed, Busey and his co-stars perform such Holly classics as “That’ll Be the Day”, “Maybe Baby”, “Not Fade Away” and more live on-screen.  Don Stroud (The Amityville Horror), Charles Martin Smith (American Graffiti), Conrad Janis (Mork & Mindy), William Jordan (Kingpin) and Maria Richwine (Hamburger: The Motion Picture) co-star.

    MOVIE:

    Revived from the ashes of another cancelled Holly biopic, Director Steve Rash (Can’t Buy Me Love) set forth to tell his own tale of the famed musicians brief but, timeless impact.  With certain liberties taken on the film’s events, The Buddy Holly Story never intends to be a fact-checking, biopic yearning for praise due to its attention to detail.  Instead, this musical drama relies solely on Busey’s uncanny performance and powerhouse live staging of Holly’s hits with co-stars Don Stroud and Charles Martin Smith to energize the film.  In retrospect, The Buddy Holly Story falls into minor clichés of the rags to riches story overrun by other music biopics, but always places priority on the music and its effect.  Comfortingly, Busey’s performance is guided by Holly’s perfectionism and songwriting abilities as opposed to any wild excess many musicians take advantage of.  Groundbreaking at the time, the cast’s live performances of Holly’s music are exhilarating and the best aspects of the film.  Raw and authentic, the music swallows the viewer with Busey and company’s tireless abilities keeping heads rocking for hours after the film concludes.

    Keeping true to the celebration of Holly’s music, The Buddy Holly Story chooses to close with Holly’s incredible final performance instead, of a somber depiction of the fatal plane crash that killed the 22 year-old, The Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens.  Far from the factual authority on Holly’s legacy, The Buddy Holly Story remains a throughly entertaining biopic brought to life by Gary Busey’s Oscar-nominated performance and the jovial spirit of Holly’s enduring classics.  Realized by a first time director, The Buddy Holly Story lives on as a cinematic musical effort that wonderfully captures the spirit of the fallen legend.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    VIDEO:

    The Buddy Holly Story is presented with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Virtually blemish free, this low-budget effort looks striking with natural skin tones and colors blossoming nicely.  Detail is quite remarkable with Busey’s crystal blue eyes, imperfect teeth and dripping perspiration capturing in vivid clarity.  Black levels are handled well with only exterior shots of the Apollo and Times Square looking slightly drab in comparison.  Clean with healthy grain levels intact, The Buddy Holly Story looks marvelous!

    RATING: 4.5/5

    AUDIO:

    Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, The Buddy Holly Story sounds mostly satisfying.  Early sequences during the Roller Rink performance, dialogue is slightly hard to make out, most likely due to the location’s acoustics and noise levels of the skates.  Luckily, the live performances are the true highlight of the mix with robust energy and sound levels delegated appropriately.  Dialogue also comes in nicely throughout the rest of the film without any hiss or other anomalies to speak of.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    EXTRAS:

    - Audio Commentary with Director Steve Rash and Star Gary Busey: Ported over from an earlier release, the two collaborators discuss various technical choices used during filming.  In addition, Rash mentions the groundbreaking live performances were all shot in one week for budgetary reasons.  Quiet gaps take place but overall, Busey and Rash maintain decent conversation and share plenty of laughs.  Busey if often caught channeling Holly once again by singing along with the film and still sounds great.

    - Isolated Score Track

    - Original Theatrical Trailer (2:37)

    - 6-page Booklet: Julie Kirgo once again lends her words to this well written piece commenting on Busey’s dynamite performance, the film’s unusual good luck in getting made and its modest $1.2 million budget.  Littered with screengrabs and poster art, Kirgo’s essays are always engaging and deepen the appreciation for the film on hand.

    RATING: 3/5

    OVERALL:

    Hailed as Busey’s finest performance, The Buddy Holly Story is an intoxicating look into the creative genius that helped shape rock ‘n roll.  Straying for certain facts, Steve Rash’s biopic never intended to be an authoritative stance on Holly’s history, opting instead to spotlight the music and mesmerizing live performances of his talented cast.  Twilight Time’s limited edition release looks and sounds phenomenal with vibrant colors and a thunderous mix.  In addition, the special features including Rash and Busey’s vintage commentary track is informative and rich with Julie Kirgo’s wise words always lending a scholarly touch to the material.  The Buddy Holly Story will leave you singing and cheering to Holly’s spectacular songs and Busey’s unforgettable performance in this low-budget, critically hailed hit.

    RATING: 4/5

    The Buddy Holly Story can be purchased exclusively at: http://www.screenarchives.com

  • Worm (2013) Special Edition DVD Review

    Worm (2013)

    Director: Doug Mallette

    Starring: John Ferguson, Shane O’Brien & Jes Mercer

    Released by: Synapse Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    In a future where our dreams are but a distant memory, a new nocturnal product will guide us back to our wildest fantasies at a cost.  Birthed out of a short film presented for Nashville’s “The 48 Hour Film Project”, Synapse Films proudly presents the feature length version of Worm, a unique sci-fi thriller that successfully won the 2013 Dark Carnival Film Festival awards for Best Screenplay and Best Actress.  

    Set in the distant future where people no longer dream, Worm centers on the newly developed Fantasites, a worm-like parasite utilized by humans to experience their wildest fantasies as they sleep.  Charles (John Ferguson), a lonely young man, longing for an escape from his uninteresting life begins using the slimy Fantasites to bring him closer to the girl of his dreams.  Eventually, things spiral out of control for Charles and his friends when the government bans the addictive product and people must seek underground means to obtain it.

    MOVIE:

    Shot on a shoestring budget and invoking a Cronenbergian tone, Worm is a wildly unique execution in genre-blending.  This sci-fi thriller takes place in a future where human dreams have been abolished for 30 years and sleep is overtaken by somber darkness.  Genetically engineered worms, known as Fantasites, hit storefronts promising citizens a new doorway into their most euphoric dreams.  Inserting one worm into your ear canal before bedtime ensures a sleep like no other, prompting everyone to subscribe to this new practice.  Shy and awkward Charles (Ferguson), in need of friendship and love, works as a maintenance man at an apartment complex.  Desperate for attention from his neighbor Reed (Shane O’Brien) and the affection of his girlfriend June (Jes Mercer), Charles seeks Fantasites to help him escape his lonely way of living.    As side-effects to the slimy sleep additives are revealed, the government bans the experimental product, birthing an illegal underground world to feed the Fantasite addiction.  Charles and Reed become junkies, surrendering themselves to whatever means necessary to get their kick.  A potential chance with June is fogged as Charles‘ life becomes a whirlwind of heartbreak and destruction.

    Impressively shot without a script, Worm was generally improvised by the actors which equally helps and hurts the film.  Finessing the dialogue would have strengthened the narrative and the characters‘ development, immensely.  In addition, its limited budget is showcased during bizarre dream sequences that fail to be quite as effective.  Luckily, Composer Bill Mitchell’s xylophone chimes feel reminiscent of Danny Elfman’s more gothic contributions, granting Worm another added layer of creepiness.  While, handled unorthodoxly, Worm still packs a solid punch as a peculiar tale of sci-fi, romance and addiction that makes one wish the production had a larger budget to realize the full scope of their intentions.

    RATING: 4/5

    VIDEO:

    Worm is presented with an anamorphic widescreen transfer, bearing a 2.35:1 aspect ratio.  Shot digitally, Worm looks fairly decent with natural skin tones and colors reading fine.  Unfortunately, the digital, student film appearance never lets viewers forget this is an independent production shot on a dime.  Worm looks as it was intendedly shot but, never appears overwhelmingly impressive.  

    RATING: 3.5/5

    AUDIO:

    Equipped with a Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo mix, Worm is audible if not, slightly problematic.  Several moments of dialogue are relayed lowly while, others suffer from a lackluster sound mix causing background music to overwhelm character interactions.  Overall, the cons on this mix are not rampant and most can be excused by the production’s low-budget.  

    RATING: 3/5

    EXTRAS:

    - Audio Commentary with Director Doug Mallette, Co-Producers Jeremy Pearce & Jennifer Bonior and Visual Effects Supervisor Julian Herrera: Chatty and enthusiastic, the group of friends keep things on track while injecting informative notes and exchanging laughter.  The difficulty of filming with dogs and the low-budget (less than $10,000), which was raised through an Indiegogo campaign, are all discussed on this worthwhile track.

    - Worm - Original Short Film (7:57): The small seed that planted the feature is apparent, but the original short is too all over the map and incoherent to enjoy beyond a curiosity viewing.

    - Deleted Scenes (10:40): Six scenes omitted from the final cut are included.

    - Original Trailer #1 (1:51)

    - Original Trailer #2 (2:07)

    RATING: 4/5

    OVERALL:

    Shot cheaply and with no script, Worm was a risky endeavor that paid off for the most part.  Successfully blending the worlds of science fiction, love and uncontrollable addiction, Worm is one of the standout independent efforts of the year.  Channeling the youth of David Cronenberg and injecting a creepy, childlike score from Bill Mitchell, the nonprofessional cast do their best guiding the slimy story of Worm.  Synapse Films has done a fine service rewarding this indie effort with a wider distribution for more eyes to witness.  Joined by an informative commentary and the original short film, Worm is an engaging specimen with a fresh story that only suffers from common low-budget woes.

    RATING: 3.5/5 

  • Sophie's Choice (1982) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    Sophie’s Choice (1982)
    Director: Alan J. Pakula
    Starring: Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline & Peter MacNicol
    Released by: Shout! Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on the best-selling novel by William Styron, Director Alan J. Pakula (All the President’s Men) brought to life this heartbreaking tale of friendship and the secrets we keep.  Starring Meryl Streep (Doubt), in an Academy Award winning performance, this exhilarating tale is complimented with powerhouse performances that will leave you in awe.  Shout! Factory, in association with ITV Studios, proudly presents Sophie’s Choice in a much deserved collector’s edition.  Ranked #91 in AFI’s Greatest 100 Movies of All Time 2007 list, Sophie’s Choice is a masterwork from all the parties involved.  

    Set in post-World War II Brooklyn, Sophie’s Choice stars Meryl Streep as Sophie Zawistowska, a Polish-Catholic immigrant who survived a Nazi concentration camp.  Living with her middle-aged Jewish boyfriend, Nathan (Kevin Kline), the couple befriend their new neighbor, would-be writer Stingo (Peter MacNicol).  As the couples’ drama unfolds and their bond with Stingo increases, hidden truths are slowly revealed.  

    MOVIE:
    Meryl Streep’s perfectionism to her craft has earned her a record 18 Academy Award nominations and three wins.  Understandably, many consider her to be the greatest living actress with memorable roles in Out of Africa, Adaptation., and August: Osage County.  With a career as illustrious as Streep’s, it becomes difficult to select a favorite let alone a flaw in her works.  Streep’s magnificent turn in Sophie’s Choice is highlighted by her determination to master the Polish and German language in order to perfect her character’s accent.  Almost immediately, the viewer forgets about Meryl Streep and only knows Sophie Zawistowska.  Streep believably sells the role of a Polish-immigrant struggling with the English language in 1940s Brooklyn.  Streep reportedly begged Pakula on her hands and knees for the role that was originally courting Magda Vásáryová.  Sophie’s Jewish, Holocaust obsessed boyfriend, Nathan, is played with equal brilliance by Kevin Kline (The Big Chill), in his feature film debut.  Kline’s energetic performance is akin to Jekyll and Hyde as he adores Sophie one minute and violently grows bitter, jealous and violent the next.  A film debut of this caliber will remind audiences that Kline may have arguably, been the greatest acting discovery of the 1980s.  Sophie and Nathan’s friendship with their new neighbor, Stingo (MacNicol), is the silver lining that bonds the trio.  Texas born, Peter MacNicol (Ghostbusters II) made his film debut only a year earlier with 1981’s Dragonslayer before tackling this intense drama.  A fine character actor with roles in Addams Family Values and Bean, MacNicol brings a breath of gravity to the film amongst his new friends’ complicated relationship.  Destined to write the great American novel, Stingo finds himself swept up in Nathan’s bipolar-esque behavior while, falling for Sophie.

    Bonds strengthen as Nathan’s outbursts become more frequent, resulting in the couples’ dark secrets being revealed.  Stingo learns the truth behind Nathan’s alarming behavior while, Sophie confides in her new friend about her concentration camp experiences. Upon arriving at Auschwitz with her two children, a Nazi soldier forces Sophie with the impossible task of choosing which of one her children will be sent to death.  The emotional impact of this haunting sequence will forever be rooted in your conscience.  As Stingo’s love for Sophie becomes clear and their future together within reach, a darkness is cast over the conclusion to this emotionally-wound, perfectly acted character study.  Sophie’s Choice sweeps the viewer into the trios’ relationship, showcasing the finer sides of true friendship and the dark secrets we all try to suppress.  Beautifully shot and remarkably cast, Sophie’s Choice is a riveting drama and heartbreaking tragedy resulting in cinematic perfection.
    RATING: 5/5

    VIDEO:
    Sophie’s Choice is presented with a 1080 transfer in a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  The film is rich with natural grain and accurate skin tones.  Colors are striking and bold, if not, inconsistent at times.  Stingo’s arrival at his new Brooklyn residence pops with bright green lawns and bushes while, dimly lit scenes in Sophie and Nathan’s apartment and Sophie’s time at Auschwitz relay a soft, (most likely) intentional lifeless color scheme.  Moments of flecks and speckles are far and few between with close-ups looking most impressive.  Sophie’s Choice has never had its fair due on home video but thankfully, Shout! Factory’s transfer is the finest its ever looked.
    RATING: 4/5

    AUDIO:
    Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Mono mix, Sophie’s Choice is a character driven drama with much dialogue that is nicely and cleanly heard throughout.  No cracks or distortion of any kind intrude, making this mix more than adequate.
    RATING: 4/5

    EXTRAS:

    - New Roundtable Discussion with Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline and More

    - Audio Commentary with Director Alan J. Pakula

    - Theatrical Trailer

    - DVD Copy

    RATING: 4.5/5

    OVERALL:
    Sophie’s Choice is a lengthy, period piece drama about the company we keep and the secrets we hold even closer.  Never boring and always engaging, the combined efforts of the magnificent Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline (in one of the finest film debuts of all time) and the criminally underrated Peter MacNicol, make this tale of three unlikely friends one of the most impressive works of the decade.  Handled with the utmost care, Shout! Factory have preserved this classic film in a worthy collector’s edition release.  Matched with a lovely video transfer, crisp sound mix and wonderful special features including the fantastic roundtable discussion with the likes of Streep and Kline, Sophie’s Choice is the rare example of a perfect film that can now be better appreciated thanks to Shout! Factory’s impressive collector’s edition.
    RATING: 4.5/5