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Currently showing posts tagged Slasher Movie

  • They're Playing with Fire (1984) Blu-ray Review

    They’re Playing with Fire (1984)

    Director: Howard Avedis

    Starring: Sybil Danning, Eric Brown, Andrew Prine & Paul Clemens

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Combining skin and thrills, They’re Playing with Fire stars Sybil Danning (Howling II: Your Sister Is a Werewolf) as a sultry college professor who seduces a horny student (Eric Brown, Private Lessons), entangling him in a dangerous plot to obtain her in-laws wealthy inheritance.  Andrew Prine (Amityville II: The Possession) and Paul Clemens (The Beast Within) costar.

    Shrouded as a wild sex-romp in tune with most young men’s desires, They’re Playing with Fire, albeit being very tantalizing, pulls the carpet under its audience in one of the oddest genre switch ups of the decade.  Incessantly drooling over his foxy professor, Mrs. Diane Stevens, and performing odd jobs aboard her luxurious yacht, college student Jay Richard’s lusting pays off when seduced by the blonde bombshell.  Unknowingly plotting a scheme with her husband Michael (Prine) to inherit his family riches from her in-laws, a virtually harmless crack at prowling to scare off the elderly Stevens’ backfires on Jay when a masked assailant ruthlessly knocks off Michael’s mother and grandmother instead.  Trapping him in a seductive love triangle with life or death stakes, Jay’s hormonal jackpot grows grayer by the day.  Regarded as exploitation royalty, Sybil Danning makes mouths water with her fiercely flirtatious performance and sizzling nude sequences that, much to the delight of teenage boys during the video boom, are plentiful.  In a deliriously unexpected spin for viewers assuming the plot from its provocative poster art, They’re Playing with Fire morphs into an erotically-charged thriller with slasher elements that pollinate the film with bloody bursts of violence catching first time watchers off guard.  Helmed by Howard Avedis (Scorchy, Mortuary), They’re Playing with Fire, rightly earning Danning one of her finest performances in a career of countlessly sexy and sleazy roles, is a wild effort right down to its even kookier reveal of the true murderer that is as unusually different as it is libido driving.

    Newly remastered, KL Studio Classics upgrades They’re Playing with Fire with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Revealing satisfying layers of detail in facial features, skin tones are sound with Danning certainly showing off her fair share during the film’s many moments of passion.  Meanwhile, costumes, background pieces and bolder colored vehicles pop quite decently with the film’s source material arriving in tiptop shape and generally free of any unsavory scratches.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix that handles character exchanges, both in intimate, hushed tones and louder barroom environments, nicely while, music cues are well orchestrated and ear-pleasing.  Special features include, Sun & Seduction with Sybil Danning (18:25) where the still mightily attractive lead reveals she landed the role based on her appearance in Playboy Magazine and her initial concerns that the script was overly convoluted.  Furthermore, Danning recalls many a fan encounters where the film played heavily into their puberty and instances of teens stealing the videotape from their fathers!  The genre titan, although finding him cute, reveals costar Eric Brown made the shoot difficult due to his unwillingness to be nude in the film.  Lastly, Trailers for They’re Playing with Fire (1:25), The Bitch (2:38) and The Stud (2:52) conclude the disc’s supplements.

    Beloved by Mr. Skin himself and most young men who experienced the film’s sumptuous offerings during its heyday, They’re Playing with Fire offers plenty of bare-breasted Sybil Danning and a chameleon-like plot that supplies an alarmingly fun touch of slasher elements for fans of the decade’s body count pictures.  A career high for the buxom B-movie queen, carnal delights never tasted this sweet or deadly before her voluptuous college professor wraps her legs around such impressionable hound dogs.  KL Studio Classics’ high-def handling of the sexy sizzler is a solid boost in quality with Danning’s newly recorded chatty sit-down a fine inclusion.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available now from KL Studio Classics, They’re Playing with Fire can be purchased via KinoLorber.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.

  • Slaughterhouse (1987) Blu-ray Review

    Slaughterhouse (1987)

    Director: Rich Roessler

    Starring: Sherry Bendor Leigh, Joe B. Barton, Don Barrett, Bill Brinsfield, Jane Higginson & William Houck 

    Released by: Vinegar Syndrome

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Hog wild horror ensues in Slaughterhouse when financially ruined butcher Lester Bacon (Don Barrett, Hobgoblins) finds his business rival, with an informed lawyer and town sheriff in his back pocket, itching to buy his decrepit property.  Convinced a conspiracy is at hand, the eccentric old-timer orders his cleaver-wielding, pig sound-making son Buddy (Joe B. Barton, Blood Diner) to take care of the offenders.  An above average slasher offering from the glory days of video rentals, Slaughterhouse delivers a simplistically sound plot that takes pride in its story better than most of its indie competitors where body count was always priority.  Following a dare to remain in the foreclosed kill kennel the longest, four teenagers, befit with big hair and hammy dialogue, find themselves at the mercy of the overall-wearing madman where the film truly lives up to it name.  Graced with hilariously oddball performances from Barrett and Barton, Slaughterhouse draws blood with a variety of kills including, limb chopping, skull crushing and taking advantage of the tools at their disposal, corpse grinding.  Climaxing with an expected yet, surprisingly well-orchestrated showdown between the hulkish killer and the film’s final girl surrounded by a shrine of meathooked victims, the inexpensively shot Slaughterhouse may not reinvent the cycle yet, stands as a solid entry next to other southern comfort slashers where its buckets of blood will make likeminded viewers squeal like piggies.

    Exceptionally restored in 2K from the original 35MM interpositive, Vinegary Syndrome proudly presents Slaughterhouse with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Shattering preemptive expectations based on the scratchy American Artists logo at the film’s onset, the low-budget slasher dazzles like never before.  Boasting stable skin tones, bold color grades throughout costume choices and the film’s bloodier moments to deep black levels offering a clear presentation of the onscreen occurrences, Slaughterhouse shines with filmic grace and a virtually spotless cleanup that definitively puts to bed shoddier standard definition and overseas releases alike.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix that honors the film’s original Ultra-Stereo track for the first time on home video, dialogue is clear and robust while musical selections are handled with fine authority, making the feature a delightful listen.  Additionally, an optional Dolby Digital 2.0 is also included.  

    Packed with both new and vintage supplements, bonus features include, an Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Rich Roessler, Producer Jerry Encoe & Production Designer Michael Scaglione, Reminiscene: Interview with Sherry Bendorf Leigh (10:40) catches up with the film’s leading lady as she reflects on the wild time making the film, Making a Low Budget Indie with Writer/Director Rick Roessler (28:16) sits down with the filmmaker as he recounts the development process of the slasher and his goal to push plot while, The Art of Producing a Low Budget Feature with Executive Producer Jerry Encoe (5:37) echoes many of Roessler’s sentiments including, their boredom making military training films that encouraged them to make Slaughterhouse and the difficulty of financing the project.  In addition, an Archival Interview with Rick Roessler from 1999 (15:16), an Archival Interview with Jerry Encoe from 1999 (10:45), Epilogue: 30 Years After the Slaughter (1:13), a Radio Interview Featurette from 1987 (4:50), Local News Coverage of Slaughterhouse Premiere (3:59) and a Shooting the Scenes: Behind the Scenes Featurette (20:48) is also included.  Lastly, Outtakes (3:08), a “No Smoking” - Slaughterhouse Theatrical Snipe (0:28), Theatrical Trailers (2:04), TV Spots (4:26), Radio Spots (0:45), the Slaughterhouse Shooting Script, a DVD Edition of the release and Reversible Cover Art conclude the mammoth spread of supplements.  Celebrating its 30th anniversary in true style, Vinegar Syndrome continues to prove their status as one of cult cinema’s leading distributors with its sparkling 2K restoration of this pigsploitation slasher, tailor-made for fans hogtied by its bloodtastically promising cover art.      

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Vinegar Syndrome, Slaughterhouse can be purchased via VinegarSyndrome.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers. 

  • Cherry Falls (2000) Blu-ray Review

    Cherry Falls (2000)

    Director: Geoffrey Wright

    Starring: Brittany Murphy, Michael Biehn, Gabriel Mann & Jay Mohr

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set in a peaceful Virginia suburb, Cherry Falls finds its community turned upside down when its virginal high school population is targeted by a crazed serial killer.  Plotting a wild sexual night of partying to better protect themselves, Jodi (Brittany Murphy, Clueless), the town sheriff’s only daughter, takes matters into her own hands to track the mysterious murderer.  Michael Biehn (The Terminator), Gabriel Mann (Revenge) and Jay Mohr (Jerry Maguire) co-star.

    Injecting a simple yet, unique twist in the revived teen slasher genre, Cherry Falls looks not to punish the promiscuous sluts of high school royalty but, instead target the pure and innocent virgins of its sleepy town.  When local teenagers turn up savagely murdered and displayed in a disturbing fashion, local authorities conclude their culprit is targeting virgins after discovering the word carved into each victims skin.  Combatting her own relationship dilemmas and pressure to sleep with her longtime boyfriend, Jody Marken (Murphy) finds herself lucky to be alive after evading certain death from the long-haired, knife-wielding killer.  While Sheriff Marken (Biehn), Jody’s father, harbors a deep-rooted secret regarding the suspected killer, hypocrisy amongst her parents forces Jody to failingly seduce her boyfriend before seeking comfort from her English teacher Mr. Marliston (Mohr).  As more victims are claimed and fear amongst the town increased, the student body hilariously plans a “Pop Your Cherry Ball” for a night of fornication to better their chances at survival.  As authorities are preoccupied with the biggest rager of the year, Jody and her father find themselves captured by the unhinged killer in a tense, bloody showdown that takes them from the madman’s basement dwelling to the massive teenage orgy happening nearby.

    Falling almost immediately behind schedule during its making, Cherry Falls continued to fight uphill battles when censorship issues halted theatrical distribution resulting in a less than ideal television premiere on the USA Network.  Garnering a small yet, loyal following, the Geoffrey Wright (Romper Stomper) helmed production amply delivers in its bloodier moments regardless of its TV movie constraints while, unsurprisingly lacking levels of skin for a feature peddling a prominent teen orgy.  Headlined by a cast delivering rather air headed performances, Cherry Falls excels in its satirical agenda as its killer with a Psycho complex offers undeniable hilarity that can hardly be taken seriously.  Admittedly imperfect, Cherry Falls may not possess the cleverness of Scream but, offers decent levels of suspense and humor where one would least expect.

    Scream Factory presents Cherry Falls with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Presented in its original telecast version due to obstacles obtaining its uncut edition, skin tones read naturally while, colors and background detail are nicely displayed with no anomalies spotted.  In addition, black levels found in the film’s many nighttime sequences are approvingly inky with a filmic layer of grain present throughout its runtime.  Following the film’s longtime unavailability, its anticipated high-definition upgrade looks excellent.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dialogue is clearly represented while, Composer Walter Werzowa's (Mortal Kombat) score, eerily reminiscent to Scream’s haunting choral arrangements, are effectively delivered.  Decent, if not slightly underwhelming, the film’s mix is quite sufficient.  In addition, an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix has also been included for your listening pleasure.  Special features include, a newly recorded Audio Commentary with Director Geoffrey Wright, Lose It or Die: The Untold Story of Cherry Falls (24:30) featuring interviews with Writer/Co-Executive Producer Ken Selden and Producer Marshall Persinger.  Sharing their unique experiences from crafting the script, the film’s tense shooting schedule and more, Selden and Persinger offer valued insight into the production although, appear a bit scatterbrained at times.  Also included, Cherry Falls Deputy: Amanda Anka (7:40) captures a new interview with the actress who played the heroic Deputy Mina plus, Vintage Interviews with Brittany Murphy, Michael Biehn, Jay Mohr and Director Geoffrey Wright (6:26), Behind the Scenes Footage (4:32), the Original Script (BD-ROM) and the film’s Theatrical Trailer (1:47) round out the assorted supplements.

    Arriving at the tail end of the 90s slasher cycle, Cherry Falls strives to alter the formula with mostly successful results.  Headlined by the late Brittany Murphy, this attack on virgins feature enjoys its fair share of bloodshed and even more laughably entertaining moments courtesy of its high-heeled antagonist.  Making its Blu-ray debut, Scream Factory welcomes this millennial offering into their growing library with pleasing A/V grades, revealing supplements and a newly commissioned cover art by the talented Joel Robinson.  In search of waterfalls that run blood red?  Then, Cherry Falls just might be what you’re looking for.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Scream Factory, Cherry Falls can be purchased via ShoutFactory.com, Amazon.com and other fine retailers.