Blu-ray/DVD Reviews


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  • Where the Buffalo Roam (1980) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    Where the Buffalo Roam (1980)

    Director: Art Linson

    Starring: Peter Boyle & Bill Murray

    Released by: Shout Select

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Culled from the wild and crazy exploits of gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson, Where the Buffalo Roam centers on the eccentric reporter (Bill Murray, Caddyshack) and his ex-attorney Carlo Lazlo, Esq. (Peter Boyle, Young Frankenstein), fueled on drugs and a madness for adventure, as they navigate the politically spiraling and violent days of the late sixties and seventies.

    The first film taken from Thompson’s toxic brand of chaotic intellect, Where the Buffalo Roam takes liberties with the facts concerning the journalist’s construction of a story based on the misadventures of friend and ex-attorney Carlo Lazlo, Esq.  Rewinding to the years 1968-1972 where Lazlo attempts to free an avalanche of San Francisco youths from overly severe drug charges, Thompson drinks and drugs his way through the proceedings while his latest deadline looms.  Rambling his way from one city to the next and leaving a trail of destruction in his wake, Thompson’s coverage of Super Bowl VI is sidetracked by the equally eccentric Lazlo’s presence who convinces the writer to join him on a mission to supply freedom fighters with heavy artillery.  Bailing on the plane escaping madness once the fuzz show and capturing the attention of young adults across the college campus circuit, Thompson offers sage advice by supporting the notion of illegal substances in the writing process and confronting then Presidential candidate Richard Nixon during an awkward bathroom encounter.  While the chemistry between Murray and Boyle sells and their performances, most notably Murray who does a sound impression of Thompson that was, for better and sometimes worse according to his fellow cast members, carried over to his next season of Saturday Night Live, Where the Buffalo Roam is structurally messy and never as funny or witty as it thinks it is.  Scored by Neil Young in one of his only film efforts, a lackluster screenplay and dismal box-office returns, trifled by Thompson’s own disdain for the finished effort, leaves Where the Buffalo Roam as merely the forgotten predecessor to Terry Gilliam’s much trippier and appreciated Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas adaptation.

    Shout Select welcomes Where the Buffalo Roam to high-definition with a 1080p transfer, preserving its 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  A softer sight, colors are favorable but never do much popping while, skin tones remain nicely detailed and natural-looking.  Very scant notices of scuffs aside, a filmic quality is inherent throughout the feature without any over-sharpening techniques applied.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is serviceable with the mumbling manner of Thompson’s speech requiring an occasional increase in volume while, the film’s excellent music choices (presented for the first time ever on home video!) ranging from cuts by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, The Temptations, Neil Young and more, offer stronger boosts in range and bass.  

    Billed under Shout Select’s Collector’s Edition banner, special features, although limited, include, Inventing the Buffalo: A Look Back with John Kaye (41:58) where the screenwriter recalls being originally tasked with scripting Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, although caring little for its source citing a lackluster narrative structure, while its rights situation was resolved.  Bluntly put, Kaye also admits to being a former drug-addict and cites his research trip with Thompson through such cities as Aspen, Los Angeles and New Orleans as a fun drug binge.  In addition, Kaye felt Art Linson, making his directorial debut on the picture, was in over his head and maintains that his working relationship with Murray was a friendly one with the exception of one evening where the star badgered Kaye to come out and party resulting in Kaye having him removed from his hotel.  Lengthy and refreshingly honest, the interview is a must-watch for fans and detractors alike.  Furthermore, the Theatrical Trailer (3:14) and Reversible Cover Art conclude the supplemental package.

    Rarely funny but earning mild points for Murray’s spot-on interpretation of Thompson and Boyle’s equally worthy performance, Where the Buffalo Roam remains Hollywood’s dusty paperback attempt at bringing Thompson’s madcap brilliance to the big-screen with mostly unfavorable results.  Although its Collector’s Edition status, given its limited supply of extras, may be debated, the quality of Kaye’s interview and the film’s original music fully intact is warrant enough.  Murray completists will be pleased with what he brings to role of one of journalism’s most eccentric voices while, Thompson purists won’t help feeling underwhelmed.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Shout Select, Where the Buffalo Roam can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • No Retreat, No Surrender (1986) Blu-ray Review

    No Retreat, No Surrender (1986)

    Director: Corey Yuen

    Starring: Kurt McKinney, J.W. Fails, Ron Pohnel, Kathie Sileno, Peter Cunningham, Kent Lipham & Jean-Claude Van Damme

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Unquestionably reminiscent of other more prominent teenage-geared martial arts pictures, No Retreat, No Surrender plays far more emphasis on its combat sequences as evidenced by its unoriginal narrative and charmingly cheesy performances.  After a pack of threatening mobsters with plans of taking over every dojo in the country descends on his father’s establishment, Bruce Lee obsessed teen Jason Stillwell (Kurt McKinney, Guiding Light) and his family head to Seattle to start anew.  Finding a pal in the break-dancing R.J. Madison (J.W. Fails, 21 Jump Street) and rekindling a romance with a former flame, Jason finds himself targeted by overweight bully Scott (Kent Lipham, Extreme Prejudice) and local karate hothead Dean Ramsay (Dale Jacoby, Ring of Fire) on the regular.  Consistently outmatched by his peers and punished by his father for his improper use of fighting, Jason seeks solace at the gravesite of martial arts legend Bruce Lee.  Training in an abandoned house with a shrine to his hero, Jason is stunned when the ghost of Lee returns to personally guide him on his path to becoming a prized fighter.  Trouble strikes again when a local tournament is disrupted by the mobsters and their deadly enforcer Ivan “The Russian” Kraschinsky (Jean-Claude Van Damme, Kickboxer) who ravages the competition with only young Jason left to defend the community and his family’s name.  An unsurprisingly first time effort for much of the principal talent, No Retreat, No Surrender is a ridiculous fight feature with hilarity to be had at the expense of the film’s goofy screenplay and unexpectedly silly plot device of Bruce Lee returning from the grave to play sensei.  Adorned with amusing training montages, a feverishly high-powered theme song and a fast-paced final round bout between the American teen and oh-so-80s Russian villain, No Retreat, No Surrender can’t help but be a fun time, using its amateurish shortcomings to its full advantage.

    KL Studio Classics presents No Retreat, No Surrender for the first time on high-definition with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Bearing surface scrapes and scratches throughout its runtime, colors are bold and exacting seen through the bright costume choices with sharp detail observed in facial closeups.  Furthermore, skin tones are consummately natural with a solidly filmic presence left intact.  Joined by a rather shoddy DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix that struggles to make any definable distinctions, dialogue is serviceable while, music, roaring crowds and the clatter of punches being thrown fall flat and underwhelming.  Although pops and other such anomalies are virtually absent, a large increase in volume during viewing is essential for the rather subdued track.  

    Containing both its recommend International (1:38:55) and U.S. Theatrical Cuts (1:24:01), additional special features include, an Audio Commentary with Screenwriter Keith W. Strandberg, Stand on Your Own with Kurt McKinney (17:12) where the film’s star recalls training in martial arts his entire life, landing the gig during an open casting call and the production spending more rehearsal time on fight choreography than the actual performances.  In addition, McKinney delves into the rather shady circumstances that convinced both he and Van Damme to pass on the sequel.  Lastly, Trailers for the International Cut of No Retreat, No Surrender (3:20), An Eye for an Eye (1:52), Enter the Ninja (2:53), Avenging Force (1:18), Revenge of the Ninja (1:41) and Steele Justice (1:36) are also on hand.  Delightfully silly with respectable fight sequences featured, No Retreat, No Surrender may technically be a poorly made effort but, one that cult enthusiasts will revel in for all its dodgy issues and valiant efforts.  Making its Blu-ray debut with both cuts included, KL Studio Classics delivers a roundhouse kick of satisfaction to fans anxiously awaiting for this Cold War of martial arts movies.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available now from KL Studio Classics, No Retreat, No Surrender can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • Snowden (2016) Blu-ray Review

    Snowden (2016)

    Director: Oliver Stone

    Starring: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Shailene Woodley, Melissa Leo, Zachary Quinto, Tom Wilkinson, Scott Eastwood, Timothy Olyphant, Rhys Ifans & Nicolas Cage

    Released by: Universal Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on the controversial true story, Snowden centers on intelligence employee Edward Snowden (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, The Walk) who exposed the NSA’s illegal surveillance activities and the political and personal fallout of his decision.  Shailene Woodley (The Fault in Our Stars), Melissa Leo (The Fighter), Zachary Quinto (Star Trek Beyond), Rhys Ifans (The Amazing Spider-Man) and Nicolas Cage (Joe) costar.

    No stranger to tackling the events of recent history and leaving viewers grossly divided over their political intentions, Academy Award winner Oliver Stone (Born on the Fourth of July, World Trade Center) spotlights his most controversial figure to date in the equally grounded and thrilling Snowden.  Juxtaposing from the whistleblower’s 2013 revelation to journalists about the NSA’s secretive surveillance measures on citizens and his decade long ascent to prestigious positions within the CIA and other agencies, Snowden moves swiftly as it constructs the portrait of a brilliant individual willing to serve his country before profound truths question his very principles and threaten his livelihood if exposed.  Proving his abilities as one of his generation’s finest talents, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, possessing a solid resemblance to his real-life character and seamlessly capturing Snowden’s inherent shyness and uncanny speech mannerisms makes his performance a marvel to watch.  Complimented by especially noteworthy performances by Shailene Woodley as Snowden’s dedicated girlfriend Lindsay Mills, Rhys Ifans as Deputy Director Corbin O’Brian and an understated appearance by Academy Award Winner Nicolas Cage as a mentor to the titular character, Snowden bares no weaknesses in its casting calls for any of its talented thespians.  While Snowden’s ultimate decision to reveal his findings to the world were met with equal cries of praise and treachery, Stone’s dramatization of the events provides viewers with a deeper examination of the man’s personal life as well as his increased anxiety, diagnosis with epilepsy and the tightening noose of being privy to such information suffocating his moral compass and obligation to the people of the world.  With the effect of the actual events still impacting the world and people’s view of their governments, Snowden succeeds in navigating the political intricacies of the controversy with precision while, Edward’s personal journal and sacrifices remain the film’s priority delivering viewers an emotionally bonding and dramatically gripping experience that ranks as one of Stone’s best offerings in years.

    Universal Studios Home Entertainment presents Snowden with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Shot digitally, skin tones are captured with exceptional clarity and spot-on accurateness while, the sunny shades of the film’s Hawaiian sequences are richly projected with details seen in backgrounds of Edward and Lindsay’s apartments handsomely observed.  Equipped with a strong DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, dynamics are not wholly diverse in the character-driven piece with dialogue relayed with the utmost crispness that serves it well.  Special features include, Deleted Scenes (8:51), Finding the Truth (3:57), a typical EPK with interview snippets from Stone, Gordon-Levitt and clips from the film plus, a Snowden Q&A (41:00) moderated by Matt Zoller Seitz, Stone, Gordon-Levitt, Woodley and the real Snowden (via satellite) are on hand in this conversational gathering that covers Snowden’s impressions of a film developed on him as well as the struggle of making the feature.  Lastly, Previews (9:38) for Triple 9, Spotlight, Dope, The Gunman, Rosewater, Nightcrawler, Chef and End of Watch round out the on-disc supplements with a DVD edition and Digital HD Code also included. 

    While the public at large will continue to remain divided over Edward Snowden’s controversial actions, Oliver Stone’s big-screen account of the events will keep moviegoers drawn into its complex questions of principles, freedoms and responsibility.  Chalking up another stirring performance from leading man Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Snowden keeps the global repercussions of the NSA reveal crucial if not secondary to Edward’s personal journey, ensuring an effectively more human story to emerge from the headline-fueled saga.  Meanwhile, Universal Studios Home Entertainment delivers pristine efforts in both video and audio although, special features remain overwhelmingly scant.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Universal Studios Home Entertainment, Snowden can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • The Return of Godzilla (1984) Blu-ray Review

    The Return of Godzilla (1984)

    Director: Koji Hashimoto

    Starring: Ken Tanaka, Yasuko Sawaguchi, Yosuke Natsuki, Keiju Kobayashi, Shin Takuma & Kenpachiro Satsuma

    Released by: Kraken Releasing

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    A direct sequel to the original Japanese classic, The Return of Godzilla finds the gargantuan monster awakening following a volcanic eruption on Daikoku Island.  With a local sea vessel left destroyed and only one surviving mate, a young Tokyo reporter, joined by a brilliant professor and his assistant’s technological advancements, seek to stop the destructive beast before nuclear means bring an end to the attacked country.  

    Following flailing box-office returns and decreased interest in their once treasured franchise, Toho would seek to rejuvenate their nuclear powered star after nearly a decade of hibernation and false starts.  Excluding any monster-sized costars and recapturing the darker tone of its originator, The Return of Godzilla is a powerhouse redemption that makes the titular character once again a menacing force to be reckoned with under a clout of anti-nuclear sublimation, heightened by the real world fears of Cold War armageddon.  Awarded an increased budget and a higher stature for Godzilla than ever before, the long-awaited sequel impresses with detailed miniature sets of the bustling metropolis, a robotically controlled and emotionally prevalent head for its monster, and franchise veteran Kenpachiro Satsuma (Godzilla VS. Hedorah, Godzilla VS. Biollante) bringing destructive grace to the character under its rubber suit.  After Godzilla’s return is quietly downplayed by the government and an attacked Soviet submarine increases tension between the region and the United States, the truth of Japan’s ultimate destructor can no longer be contained.  As diplomats and the military scramble to combat expected attacks from the monster, local reporter Goro Maki (Tanaka), Godzilla survivor Hiroshi Okumura (Takuma), his sister Naoko (Sawaguchi) and the noted Professor Hayashida (Natsuki) develop an experimental homing device to lure the beast away from civilization.  As other nations gear up for defense, a destructive Soviet missile is accidentally launched creating further chaos and increased energy for the battered Godzilla.  Skyline rampages and explosive wreckage ensues before the civilians succeed in luring the King of the Monsters to the actively volcanic Mt. Mihara  in hopes of a fatal eruption.

    While the bulk of its runtime is regulated to governmental squabbling and laboratory developments to thwart the beast, The Return of Godzilla makes the wait well worth it with an entertainingly catastrophic third act that pits Godzilla against the armored fortress known as Super X that temporarily defuses the enemy with cadmium shells.  Earning Japan’s Academy Award for Special Effects, The Return of Godzilla would prove moderately successful for the studio with overseas versions, namely New World Pictures’ Americanized Godzilla 1985 effort, making controversial changes and drifting away from its intendedly darker approach.  Regardless of its preferred viewing form (presented here only in its uncut original incarnation), The Return of Godzilla succeeds in diminishing the colorful hero of sorts the character evolved into and reverting the beast and the franchise back to its gloomier roots of nuclear devastation.

    Kraken Releasing presents The Return of Godzilla with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Repurposing the master utilized on its Japanese counterpart, quality appears relatively dated and lacking sharpness in skin tones while, select costume choices featuring bolder colors pop appropriately.  While no severe age-related scratches or scuffs are on hand, black levels are serviceable yet, suffer from inherent graininess.  Although not quite as desirably crisp as hoped for, The Return of Godzilla looks as good as to be expected.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, the Japanese dialect, joined by English subtitles (including burned-in captions applied over occasional non-Japanese dialogue), is satisfactory while missile blasts, building destruction and Godzilla’s iconic roar suffer from lackluster pushes on the track.  In addition, an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 English mix has also been included.  Unfortunately minimal, bonus features include, a Theatrical Promo (3:03) and an Also Available from Kraken Releasing section featuring trailers for Ebirah - Horror of the Deep (2:16), Godzilla VS. Gigan (2:11) and Godzilla VS. Hedorah (2:09).

    Anxiously awaited although hardly definitive with the legally convoluted Godzilla 1985 cut notably absent, The Return of Godzilla, presented in its original uncut Japanese glory, ranks as one of the series’ best offerings that channels the original film’s anti-nuclear message and returns the radioactive breathing monster back to his villainous standing.  Continuing their domestic releases of the Godzilla franchise, Kraken Releasing welcomes the 1984 sequel with serviceable grades that while imperfect, will leave fans satisfied enough to fill the void in their monster collections with.  

    RATING: 3/5

    Available September 13th from Kraken Releasing, The Return of Godzilla can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • The Finest Hours (2016) Blu-ray Review

    The Finest Hours (2016)

    Director: Craig Gillespie

    Starring: Chris Pine, Casey Affleck, Ben Foster, Holliday Grainer, John Ortiz & Eric Bana

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on the fascinating true story, The Finest Hours retells the greatest small-boat rescue in Coast Guard history where a deadly storm threatened the lives of countless sailors aboard a sinking oil tanker.  Led by Captain Bernie Webber (Chris Pine, Star Trek), the determination and actions of his crew would ultimately define unparalleled heroism.  Casey Affleck (Gone Baby Gone), Ben Foster (The Program), Holliday Grainer (Jane Eyre), John Ortiz (Togetherness) and Eric Bana (Deliver Us from Evil) co-star.

    Detailing the frightening 1952 rescue mission off the coast of Cape Cod, The Finest Hours is the latest of Disney’s inspirational tales lifted from the pages of history.  In one of his best roles to date, Chris Pine stars as disciplined Coast Guard crewman Bernie Webber whose love for local beauty Miriam Pentinen (Grainer) quickly escalates to a charming engagement.  Before long, the seas are struck with a devastating storm that leaves two separate oil tankers split in two with   their crews struggling to survive.  Tasked with an impossible mission, Webber is dispatched to rescue his fellow seamen with a limited crew and only a small boat as their steed.  Juxtaposing between the crew of the sinking ship, led by the resourceful Ray Sybert (Affleck), Webber’s own confrontations with 60-foot waves and the worried citizens on shore, The Finest Hours weaves a historically accurate account that submerges viewers through its increasingly tense circumstances with effective realism.  While Pine leads the film with heavy emotion, Grainer’s chemistry with her onscreen beau is equally noteworthy.  Meanwhile, Ben Foster, alongside Kyle Gallner (Jennifer’s Body) and John Magaro (Carol), provide powerful supporting performances as Webber’s crew mates while Eric Bana, appearing as Webber’s superior officer is largely forgettable.

    Helmed by Craig Gillespie (Million Dollar Arm and Fright Night, the latter released under Disney’s Touchstone Pictures banner), The Finest Hours may appear predictable yet, the exceptional staging of its disastrous sea sequences and uplifting finale greatly outweigh its foreseeable developments.  Theatrically released in 3D during the dead of winter, The Finest Hours would prove to be Disney’s first financial failure in a year of other box-office winners for the Mouse House.  Unfortunate and grossly unwarranted, The Finest Hours may possess shades of saccharine but ultimately triumphs as an important footnote in Coast Guard history, warmly retold with solid performances and impressive visual effects.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents The Finest Hours with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.39:1 aspect ratio.  Cloaked in constant darkness, nighttime sequences on dry land and at sea demonstrate impressive inkiness while skin tones are beautifully handled.  Although the film’s color scheme is far from vast, details are sharply identified in wardrobe choices making for an exceptional viewing experience.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is always audible with the crashing sounds of the sea’s violent waves making tremendous impact.  Bonus features include, Against All Odds: The Bernie Webber Story (14:10) where Director Craig Gillespie, Authors Michael J. Tougias, Casey Sherman and other key talent discuss the film’s true events with footage lifted from the actual town of Chatham, Massachusetts.  In addition, Deleted Scenes (4:28), Brotherhood (1:49), a standard EPK focusing on the camaraderie amongst the male actors, Two Crews (2:02) where the unique circumstances confronted by both crews in the film are briefly detailed and What Is Your Finest Hour? (1:02) where a Coast Guard member retells their most heroic moment are also included.  Finally, The Finest Inspiration: The U.S. Coast Guard (1:42) and a Digital HD Code round out the disc’s remaining supplements.

    Disney’s commitment to real world underdog tales has paid off once again with The Finest Hours.  While its basis may appear predictable from the onset, the emotional subtext and unbelievable odds confronted by the characters gives viewers a thrilling ride that will surely increase one’s appreciation for the fearless members of the Coast Guard.  Furthermore, Disney’s high-definition release is a remarkable sight that makes up for its limited bonus features.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, The Finest Hours can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming (1966) Blu-ray Review

    The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming (1966)

    Director: Norman Jewison

    Starring: Carl Reiner, Eva Marie Saint, Alan Arkin, Jonathan Winters & Paul Ford

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studios Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set on the fictional island of Gloucester off the coast of Massachusetts, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming centers on a Soviet submarine of non-threatening Russians as they run aground near the American island.  Stuck and embarrassed to seek international help, a group of soldiers embark on U.S. soil to locate mechanical assistance, igniting a storm of hilarious panic on the local population.  Carl Reiner (The Dick Van Dyke Show), Eva Marie Saint (Grand Prix), Alan Arkin (Little Miss Sunshine), Brian Keith (The Wind and the Lion), Theodore Bikel (The Defiant Ones), Jonathan Winters (The Smurfs) and Paul Ford (The Phil Silvers Show) lead the ensemble cast.

    At the height of Cold War tension and amongst other cinematic wartime responses including The Bedford Incident and Fail-Safe, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming would offer a noticeably more humorous approach to the grim subject.  Based on the novel by Nathaniel Benchley, this satire of wartime worries and Soviet paranoia would headline a charismatic ensemble cast including, Alan Arkin in his film debut and a screenplay from William Rose (It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad World, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner).  In an instance of art and life coming together, comedic genius Carl Reiner plays vacationing comedy writer Walt Whittaker joined by his loving wife Elspeth (Saint) and their two children.  Soaking in the New England island, an unexpected Soviet submarine, innocently enjoying the American scenery, grounds to a startling halt.  Unable to move, Lieutenant Yuri Rozanov (Arkin), aided by several others, leads a mission to summon local reinforcement to help free them when a series of incidents convince the quiet island’s population that their international enemies have invaded.  Nominated for several Academy Awards, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming follows the local police chief (Keith), along with fellow officer Norman Jonas (Winters), as they attempt to make sense of the fast-traveling news of a Soviet attack.  Meanwhile, the Whittaker’s, aware of the Russians‘ harmless intentions, have little luck improving the situation as hilarious rumor after rumor emerges, increasing the havoc.  As the film follows several groups of characters, as well as highlighting a blooming romance between the Whittaker’s babysitter (Andrea Dromm) and a handsome Russian (John Phillip Law), The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming often feels dated, never fully living up to its uproarious reputation.  Comedy icon Carl Reiner as the leading straight man feels vastly underused while, the young Arkin steals the thunder with his uncanny accent and difficulty with the English language.  While, several moments of genuine humor take place, most notably when Reiner and Gloucester’s switchboard operator attempt to escape from Russian capture, the overwhelming lack of music makes most sequences appear drier than intended.

    Notable for shining Russians in a positive light, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming concludes with a heroic display of courage between the local population and their onetime foes sending the film off on a charming note.  Admired for its favorable impact in both the U.S. and the Soviet Union, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming may not be the most efficient comedy of its kind but, does offer a handful of laughs within its rather lengthy 126 minute runtime that are well worth a shot.

    Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.35:1 aspect ratio.  Littered with its fair share of flakes and speckles, colors waver from the satisfying sight of warm skin tones and beautiful exterior shots to the slightly dingy black levels seen in nighttime sequences.  Retaining its natural grain with digital tinkering spared, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming should appease most.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming arrives with dialogue sounding rich and clear while, its brief uses of music and other striking sound effects offer a suitable boost without ever overwhelming.  Special features include a vintage Making-of Featurette hosted by Producer/Director Norman Jewison as he explains the picture’s history in this absorbing watch (23:00) joined by an Original Theatrical Trailer (4:29).

    A critical and commercial hit, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming dares to look into the face of raging war and laugh, side by side with our proposed enemies.  Starring an endlessly talented cast, Director Norman Jewison’s (In the Heat of the Night) wartime parody ultimately suffers from being a dated product of its time and falling short on more laughs than anticipated.  Luckily, Kino Lorber Studio Classics‘ Blu-ray treatment shines with satisfying tech-specs and a worthwhile interview with Jewison.  Worthy of experiencing, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming  contains decent humor but, should not be expected to issue full-blown war on viewers‘ funny bones.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.