Blu-ray/DVD Reviews


Currently showing posts tagged Walt Disney

  • Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017) Blu-ray Review

    Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017)

    Director(s): Joachim Rønning & Espen Sandberg

    Starring: Johnny Depp, Javier Bardem, Brenton Thwaites, Kaya Scodelario, Kevin R. McNally & Geoffrey Rush

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Crashing into the cinematic seas for its fifth adventure, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales once again finds the flamboyant Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp, Alice Through the Looking Glass) caught in the crosshairs of his most formidable foe yet, the undead Captain Salazar (Javier Bardem, Skyfall).  After being outsmarted by Sparrow years earlier and cursed upon entry into the Devil’s Triangle, the vengeful Salazar seeks to make the endlessly drunk pirate pay.  Meanwhile, young Henry Turner’s (Brenton Thwaites, Maleficent) determination to locate the Trident of Poseidon to free his own father from sea-drifting captivity pits him with Carina Smyth (Kaya Scodelario, The Maze Runner), a resourceful astronomer whose curiosity and intelligence make the journey possible.  Also welcoming Captain Jack’s established frenemy, Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush, Genius), back to the proceedings, the young newcomers find themselves, for better or worse, in the company of Jack as Salazar hunts the swashbucklers to the Trident’s island in an action-packed climax.

    Billed as the franchise’s curtain call, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales returns to the ghoulish roots of its original chapter with a fresh-faced cast of newcomers playing strongly against Depp’s eccentric captain who continues to prove the chameleon-like thespian is having more fun than ever in the role.  Kickstarting with a hilarious and technically impressive bank robbery by Jack’s crew who accidentally steal the entire bank itself, Javier Bardem sends chills down audiences’ spines as the demonic Captain Salzar whose mouthful of black slobber and undead appearance casts an effectively foreboding shadow upon the film.  With several surprises in store for longtime fans of the franchise, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales also gives the treasured Captain Barbossa far more depth than before making the film perhaps the most gratifying for the series veteran.  Far more in line with the charm of the Disney film’s debut outing and boasting top-tier spectacle value, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales is an above average delight that proves Captain Jack still commands the high seas.

    Marveling with its 1080p transfer, presented in a 2.40:1 aspect ratio, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment continues to prove its pristine abilities with this flawless presentation that accentuates sharp skin tones, exacting black levels and crisp details spotted in Salazar’s deathly appearance and his man-eating zombie sharks.  Accompanied with a powerful DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is crisply projected while, the film’s swelling themes provide bonafide boosts to the action-packed proceedings.  Notably shorter than previous Pirates films, special features include, Dead Men Tell More Tales: The Making of a New Adventure (47:50), a seven-part featurette exploring the creation of the epic production with interviews from some of the film’s young stars, the film’s many visual effects and the franchise’s enduring presence in pop culture.  Furthermore, Bloopers of the Caribbean (2:58), a Jerry Bruckheimer Photo Diary (1:40) and Deleted Scenes (2:59) round out the on-disc supplements while, a DVD copy and Digital HD Code are also provided.

    Earning a respectable near $800 million while dividing critics and audiences, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales is a return to form for the franchise that once left fans dizzied by its third adventure before sticking to simplicity with On Stranger Tides.  Harkening back to what made the original film so special without overthrowing it, the fifth installment does an admirable job with its renewed mojo hinting that this may not be Captain Jack’s final sail at sea after all to which we say yo-ho!  Although less desirable in its scant offering of bonus features, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents the film in a quality as visually and sonically rich as the Caribbean itself.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Bambi (1942) Signature Collection Blu-ray Review

    Bambi (1942)

    Director(s): David Hand, James Algar, Samuel Armstrong, Graham Heid, Bill Roberts, Paul Satterfield & Normal Wright

    Starring: Bobby Stewart, Donnie Dunagan, Hardie Albright, Peter Behn, Stan Alexander, Paula Winslowe, Will Wright & Ann Gillis

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on Felix Salten’s novel, Bambi charts a young deer’s adventures in the wild from infancy to maturity as memorable moments and dangerous encounters shape him into the prince of the forest he was born to be.

    Intended to be Walt Disney’s followup to his critically acclaimed debut of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the tale’s bleaker tone and Disney’s perfectionism to capture realistic animated depictions of the characters required years of extensive development before fully coming to fruition.  A master of intuitive storytelling, Disney’s softening of the material for his family-friendly audience proved wise while, the slow and oftentimes demanding nature of bringing more lifelike expression to forest animals than ever before would payoff as one of the studio’s most visually dazzling sights.  Quieter on dialogue with the changing of seasons, complimented by musical orchestrations and the chimes of nature’s critters, unfolding the narrative, Bambi invites viewers to the miracle of a baby deer’s birth as we witness his first steps and words before befriending lifelong friends Thumper, the adorable scene-stealing bunny, and Flower, a bashful skunk.  Cared for by his protective mother and slowly learning how to survive the harsh winter seasons, the threat of gun-touting hunters alter the young deer’s life forever in a sequence long considered one of Disney’s most tragically effective.  Taken in by the fatherly great prince of the woods, Bambi comes of age, returning to the wilderness of his youth to reunite with old friends, falls for a fellow deer and faces his greatest challenge yet when his home is engulfed in flames.  

    The fifth of Disney’s cherished animated features only behind other such classics as Fantasia and Dumbo, Bambi excels through its gorgeous visuals and flawless animation that once again set a new bar of excellence for the studio.  A costly investment that failed to recoup its original budget, Bambi’s impact on audiences has never wavered and continues to delight viewers with its humorous moments of Bambi struggling to find his balance on ice and the tearjerking drama conveyed through its moments of personal loss.  A touchstone achievement with timeless themes of love and conservation at its core, Bambi stands as animation’s lasting love letter to nature and all its majestic inhabitants.

    Recycling their Diamond Edition transfer from 2011, Walt Disney Studios’ Home Entertainment’s 1080p transfer (1:33:1) of Bambi is just as marvelous as before with the gorgeous greenery of the woods, vibrants colors found in the various furs of the animals and fantastic background paintings looking flawless.  Meanwhile, the same DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix is once again on hand delivering dialogue clearly and giving eloquent force to Frank Churchill and Edward H. Plumb’s beautifully dreamy score.  

    In addition to presenting the Original Theatrical Edition (1:09:50) with optional DisneyView and a thoroughly interesting Inside Walt’s Story Meetings: Extended Edition (1:35:55), new supplements include, Studio Stories: Bambi (4:56) featuring archival recordings of Walt Disney culled from interviews circa 1956, Deleted Scenes (7:25) with introductions by Animator Floyd Norman, an Oswald the Lucky Rabbit in Africa Before Dark (5:50) short film, The Bambi Effect (3:00) and Bambi Fawn Facts (3:34).  Furthermore, vintage bonus features carried over feature Classic Deleted Scenes (3:07), a Deleted Song: “Twitterpated” (1:52), The Making of Bambi: A Prince is Born (53:15), Tricks of Our Trade (Excerpt) (7:18), Inside the Disney Archives (8:39), The Old Mill: Animated Short (8:58), The Golden Age (6:24) and the Original Theatrical Trailer (2:12).  Lastly, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Cars 3 (0:57) and Beauty and the Beast (1:38) round out the on-disc extras.  Additionally, Celebrating Tyrus Wong (8:56), available only digitally, examines the long life of the famed artist, who passed away only last year at the age of 106, and his lasting impressions on Bambi.  Fans are also treated to a Collectible Tyrus Wong Lithograph in the packaging’s interior while, a DVD edition and Digital HD are also provided.

    Retaining the same splendid audio and visual specifications as its previous outing on Blu-ray, Bambi’s Signature Collection Edition joins the line with several new worthy supplements including a new Oswald the Lucky Rabbit short while, a stash, albeit incomplete, selection of classic extras are also on-hand.  Lovers, young and old, of Disney’s golden age efforts will be delighted to add this quintessential feature into their collections if they haven’t already and cherish the breathtaking sights of Bambi and his furry friends for years to come.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Bambi can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Pinocchio (1940) Signature Collection Blu-ray Review

    Pinocchio (1940)

    Director(s): Ben Sharpsteen, Hamilton Luske, Bill Roberts, Norman Ferguson, Jack Kinney, Wilfred Jackson & T. Hee

    Starring: Dickie Jones, Christian Rub, Cliff Edwards, Mel Blanc, Charles Judels & Evelyn Venable

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    In Walt Disney’s animated masterpiece, Pinocchio finds a magical wooden puppet coming to life and assisted by his conscience, the faithful Jiminy Cricket.  In an adventurous quest that tests the impressionable marionette’s bravery and honesty, the wave crashing events will determine his desire to become a real boy to his loving creator Geppetto.

    Based on, albeit severely deviating, from Carlo Collodi’s enduring tale, Disney’s followup to the spectacle of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs eclipses its predecessor in every way.  With the profits of Disney’s animated feature-length debut handy, technical advancements from blended color effects to animated underwater realism and a profound desire to prove his studio and artists were more than one-trick ponies, Pinocchio stands as the defining work of a creator unrestricted by his limitless imagination, never to be seen or experienced on such a grand scale again.  Yearning for a child of his own, lonely toymaker Geppetto wishes upon a star for his latest puppet to become a real boy.  Given life to his wooden body by the enchanting Blue Fairy, Pinocchio must prove himself honest and brave before the wish can truly come to fruition.  Narrating the film’s proceedings and serving as Pinocchio’s personal conscience, pint-sized Jiminy Cricket promises to guide the now stringless puppet on his journey of self-discovery.  As temptation rears its head and ignoring the advice of Jiminy, Pinocchio finds himself conned by the swindling Honest John and his feline companion Gideon before being sold to the heinous Stromboli as a moneymaker in his puppet sideshow and whisked away to the anarchic Pleasure Island by a devilish Coachman.  While Geppetto, along with his faithful pets Figaro and Cleo, frantically search for his son, Pinocchio is absorbed by the island’s seedy activities and ultimately transformed into a donkey.  Before long, Pinocchio’s family is swallowed whole by the ghastly whale Monstro, inspiring the wooden boy and Jiminy Cricket to risk life and limb to save them from certain doom and rightly earning his place as a real boy.

    A clear advancement over Walt Disney’s game-changing opus just three years earlier, Pinocchio is the fullest embodiment of Disney’s visionary style and also the studio’s bleakest effort produced during its Golden era.  Retaining the cautionary tone of age-old folktales, Pinocchio urges young viewers to mind menacing temptations and remain truthful while, at its core, is a heartfelt story concerning fathers and sons.  From its serene beginnings in Geppetto’s warm workshop to the foreboding downpours and unwholesome characters Pinocchio encounters on his road to righteousness, the film serves as a fabled account of prepubescent maturity.  Through the garishly intriguing sights of Pleasure Island and Pinocchio’s frightening confrontation with Monstro, the unrelenting suspense and drama captured in these sequences are unparalleled in Disney’s vast history.  Juxtaposed with touching yet, not overly sentimental warmth and comical sight gags at the expense of the puppet’s naiveté, Pinocchio runs the emotional gamut with ease and utmost precision.  With his money firmly placed where his mouth was once again, Disney spared no expense from the film’s grandest moments to its more rudimentary details presenting a feature eclipsing anything produced by its makers, earning its place as Disney’s gold standard for all other features to be compared to.

    Recycling the technical specifications of its Platinum Edition release, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Pinocchio with a 1080p transfer, retaining its 1.33:1 aspect ratio.  A mark of high-definition excellence, colors are vast and bold with age-related anomalies nonexistent and black levels appearing deeply rich.  Furthermore, the same DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix strongly relays the film’s dialogue levels and award winning score with only mild exchanges of softness that is less a complaint then an observation.  Newly produced supplements on this release include, the two-part featurette The Pinocchio Project: “When You Wish Upon A Star” with The Project (3:03) focusing on the recoding of the beloved track’s cover with interviews from the musical participants while, The Video (2:49) presents the finished music video of the completed song.  In addition, Walt’s Story Meetings: Pleasure Island (7:14) takes transcriptions from 1938-1939 story meetings and presents them with recreated narrations and stills to detail the development of this awe-inspiring sequence.  Also included, In Walt’s Words - Pinocchio (4:48) is an archival recording of Walt Disney from interviews conducted in 1956 and his thoughts on his animated followup.  Lastly, Oswald The Lucky Rabbit in “Poor Papa” (5:19), an animated short featuring Disney’s pre-Mickey star rounds out the release’s new to disc bonus  features.

    Offering the film’s Original Theatrical Edition, DisneyView and Sing-Along with the Movie options, classic bonus features ported over include, No Strings Attached: The Making of Pinocchio (56:09), Deleted Scenes (10:33), The Sweatbox (6:25), Geppetto’s Then and Now (10:57), Live-Action Reference Footage (9:57) and a Publicity section featuring the film’s Original Theatrical Trailer (1:52), the 1984 re-release Theatrical Trailer (1:25) and the 1992 re-release Theatrical Trailer (1:33).  Furthermore, “When You Wish Upon A Star” Music Video by Meaghan Jette Martin (3:14), A Wish Come True: The Making of Pinocchio (5:06), a Storyboard-To-Film Final Comparison (4:04) and Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Descendants 2 (0:17), Elena of Avalor (0:17), Born in China (1:14), 2017’s Beauty and the Beast (1:37) and Moana (1:37) round out the entirety of the disc’s supplemental offerings while, a DVD edition and Digital HD Code are also provided.

    Simply stated, the artistic majesty, adventurous storytelling and iconic characters of Disney’s Pinocchio make the film a direct result of wishing upon a star and witnessing true magic come alive.  Released in a golden era of unequivocal classics, Disney’s daring second feature is unlike anything else with a beauty and emotional core unmatched, soaring above the others as the studio’s towering achievement.  Retaining its Platinum Edition’s already flawless restoration, the Signature Collection’s handful of new and stockpile of vintage supplements make those without this essential slice of animated perfection a no-brainer.  

    RATING: 5/5

    Available January 31st from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Pinocchio can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Beauty and the Beast (1991) 25th Anniversary Edition: Signature Collection Blu-ray Review

    Beauty and the Beast (1991)

    Director(s): Gary Trousdale & Kirk Wise

    Starring: Paige O’Hara, Robby Benson, Richard White, Jerry Orbach, David Ogden Stiers, Angela Lansbury, Bradley Michael Pierce, Rex Everheart & Jesse Corti

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    In Disney’s 30th animated feature, Beauty and the Beast finds independent bookworm Belle (Paige O’Hara, Enchanted) rescuing her father from an enchanted castle and a cruel beast’s (Robby Benson, Running Brave) captivity.  Sacrificing her own freedom and looking deep within to see the beast’s inner beauty, the blossoming love between the two unlikely housemates will prove magically invaluable in breaking the spell cast on the titanic castle and its residents.

    A tale as old as time and beloved by generations worldwide, Beauty and the Beast continues the triumphant return to form of Disney’s animation division following the runaway success of The Little Mermaid.  Once again combining timeless characters, brilliant musical arrangements by Alan Menken and the late Howard Ashman, and a story of true love, the romantic fairy tale enchants viewers with its grace, humor and themes of acceptance.  Attempted several times throughout Walt Disney’s career to no avail, Beauty and the Beast continues the magical traditions of its golden age forefathers with mesmerizing art and catchy tunes while, charting its own breathtaking path earning itself the first Best Picture Academy Award nomination for an animated film.  Seeped in gothic romance with glitzy broadway style musical sequences, the valued vocal efforts of Jerry Orbach (Law & Order), David Ogden Stiers (M*A*S*H*) and Angela Lansbury (Murder, She Wrote) bring impressionable life to their memorable roles as Lumiere, Cogsworth and Mrs. Potts but, more importantly make viewers feel warmly at home within their company.  In addition, brute Gaston (Richard White, House of Mouse), along with his hilariously buffoonish accomplice Lefou (Jesse Corti, Zootopia), make for some of Disney’s grandest antagonists while, the development of Belle and Beast’s evolving love may be the most beautiful of all the mouse house’s animated features.

    Showered in critical praise, deserved awards and box-office riches upon its initial release, Beauty and the Beast would continue to welcomes guests to its enchanted castle through a Broadway musical, two direct-to-video followups, an enduring Disney Park presence and a theatrical 3D re-release.  With its reputation graciously preceding itself after a quarter century, Beauty and the Beast’s impact and instantly recognizable songs can’t be understated.  A perfect storm of splendid storytelling and exemplary animation, Beauty and the Beast not only ranks as the crowning jewel of the Disney Renaissance that consisted of other such masterworks as Aladdin and The Lion King but, also one of the studio’s most treasured features of all-time.

    Repurposing their already flawless 1080p (1.78:1) transfer and sonically hailed DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix from its 2010 release, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment once again supplies three versions of the film including the preferred Original Theatrical Edition (1:24:54), Special Extended Edition (1:31:44) and a Sing-A-Long Version (1:24:54).  Also recycling its Audio Commentary (Extended Edition Only) with Directors Kirk Wise and Gary Trousdale, Producer Don Hahn & Composer Alan Menken, new on-disc supplements include, Always Belle (11:32) as Paige O’Hara reflects on her role and childhood love for the arts, Menken & Friends: 25 Years of Musical Inspiration (19:06) where fellow Disney composers Stephen Schwartz (The Hunchback of Notre Dame), Lin-Manuel Miranda (Moana) and Robert & Kristen-Anderson Lopez (Frozen) rap with Menken about the film’s memorable music, #1074: Walt, Fairy Tales & Beauty and the Beast (9:36) details Disney’s earliest developments of the film, The Recording Sessions (3:48) invites viewers into raw footage of the actors laying down their lines and 25 Fun Facts About Beauty and the Beast (5:24) hosted by Kayla Maisonet of Stuck in the Middle and Gus Kamp of Best Friends Whenever.  In addition, a Beauty and the Beast Sneak Peek (1:24) at the 2017 live-action feature, Song Selection (Sing-A-Long Edition Only), a Classic Bonus Preview (0:43) and Sneak Peeks at 2017’s Beauty and the Beast (1:37), The BFG (1:38), Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), a Disney Princess Promo (1:32), Elena of Avalor (1:02), Moana (1:26) and Finding Dory (1:39) are also included.

    For better or worse, several more hours of supplemental content including such new featurettes as Character Development: Lumiere (2:50), Character Development: Beast (3:49) and countless others are available only digitally along with other vintage bonus features.  While their inclusion is plentiful, their lack of on-disc appearances is disparaging for physical media purists.  Finally, a DVD edition and Digital HD Code round out the release’s extensive extras.

    Celebrating its 25th anniversary before asking viewers to be their guest in 2017 for its live-action counterpart, Beauty and the Beast remains as magical and captivating as ever.  With several newly created bonus features included and a reference quality presentation preserved, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment has prepped a sumptuous meal of hi-def majesty for Disney lovers to partake in.  A towering animated achievement and simply one of Disney’s best, Beauty and the Beast deserves a spot in every collector’s west wing!

    RATING: 5/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Beauty and the Beast can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • The Jungle Book (2016) Blu-ray Review

    The Jungle Book (2016)

    Director: Jon Favreau

    Starring: Bill Murray, Ben Kingsley, Idris Elba, Lupita Nyong’o, Scarlett Johansson, Giancarlo Esposito, Christopher Walken & Neel Sethi

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on the timeless tale, The Jungle Book centers on young Mowgli (Neel Sethi in his film debut), a man-cub raised by wolves, as he embarks on an adventure of self-discovery where great danger and unexpected friends lie.  Featuring the talented voice work of Bill Murray (Lost in Translation), Ben Kingsley (The Walk), Idris Elba (Star Trek Beyond), Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave), Scarlett Johansson (Lucy), Giancarlo Esposito (Once Upon a Time) and Christopher Walken (Hairspray), Jon Favreau (Iron Man) directs this modern adaptation.

    Seamlessly blending the magical whimsy of Walt Disney’s animated classic with cutting-edge visual effects, Director Jon Favreau’s live-action adaptation of Rudyard Kipling’s masterwork balances emotional gravity and awe-inspiring moments of marvel for a mesmerizingly audacious experience.  Scripted by Justin Marks (Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li), The Jungle Book remains true to the spirit of its cinematic predecessors while, injecting more of its source material back into its finished product.  Raised by wolves in the Indian jungles, man-cub Mowgli struggles to keep up with the daily challenges of his adopted family.  Plagued by a dry spell, the animals of the jungle congregate at a peaceful drinking location where the feared and severely scarred tiger Shere Khan (Elba) voices his animosity and desire to kill Mowgli.  After much deliberation, the young man-cub solely decides to leave his family for their own safety with assistance from the trusted panther Bagheera (Kingsley).  Journeying to the nearby village, Shere Khan strikes, separating the two and leaving the child to navigate exotic depths of the jungle unknown to him.  Following a near-death encounter with a hypnotic python, Mowgli is rescued by the lovably lazy bear Baloo (Murray), forging a new friendship built on ingenuity and honey consumption.  After reuniting with his former protector Bagheera and news of tragedy is reported, Mowgli overcomes a labyrinth of monkeys and their royal King Louie (Walken) to face his destiny back in the only home he knows.

    Retaining the beloved musical tunes of Terry Gilkyson and the Sherman Brothers, The Jungle Book guides viewers through a computer-generated realm of unbelievable reality populated with photorealistic animals that break new ground in movie magic wizardry.  Stunningly realized by a voice cast of Hollywood’s finest including, the pitch-perfect Bill Murray as Baloo and the briefly seen yet, wholly impactful Scarlett Johansson as the seductively sneaky Kaa, newcomer Neel Sethi brings a youthful energy and wide-ranging charisma to his role as the film’s only central human character.  Epically conceived and pushing the boundaries of adventure to new heights, The Jungle Book delivers far more than the bare necessities, ensuring a heartwarming and intensely packed avenue of escapism for all ages.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents The Jungle Book with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Flawless in every aspect, the lush greenery of the jungle to its more rainy and overcast skies read with exceptional clarity.  Meanwhile, Mowgli’s skin tone breathes with natural ease while, scars and the delicacy of all animal furs appear with impressive detail.  Finally, black levels found in Bagheera’s coat and King Louie’s dilapidated kingdom are exquisitely inky and deep making Disney’s latest transfer yet another mark of visual perfection.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is solidly relayed with the natural ambiance of a jungle setting nicely supported.  In addition, John Debney’s (Sin City, Iron Man 2) score packs immersive depth while, animal roars, bass heavy stampedes and of course, Murray and Walken’s renditions of “The Bare Necessities” and “I Wan’na Be Like You”   making reference quality statements.  Special features include, an Audio Commentary with Director Jon Favreau that is both highly informative and passionate, The Jungle Book Reimagined (35:02) presents a roundtable discussion with Director Jon Favreau, Producer Brigham Taylor and Visual Effects Supervisor Robert Legato on the long, rewarding process of making the film, I Am Mowgli (8:18) explores the charming qualities that earned newcomer Neel Sethi his role in the film and his unique interactions working on an imagined set while, King Louie’s Temple: Layer by Layer (3:14) presents a nicely edited rendition of “I Wan’na Be Like You” juxtaposing from Walken’s recording, the computer-generated developments of the sequence and John Debney’s conduction of the music.  Lastly, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (1:43) and Zootopia (1:37) are included alongside a DVD edition of the release and a Digital HD Code.

    A visual splendor from start to finish, The Jungle Book continues Disney’s long, storied tradition of timeless tales and breathtaking adventure.  Achieved through dazzling technological advances, Director Jon Favreau’s modern rendition honors its animated forefather with the utmost respect while, pushing cinematic boundaries that Walt Disney himself would be impressed by.  Serving its feature rightly, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment delivers a pristine high-definition experience with a delightful dose of supplements including, a highly enjoyable commentary with Favreau that will leave viewers swinging from the trees in excitement.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available August 30th from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, The Jungle Book can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) Signature Collection Blu-ray Review

    Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

    Director(s): William Cottrell, David Hand, Wilfred Jackson, Larry Morey, Perce Pearce & Ben Sharpsteen

    Starring: Adriana Caselotti, Lucille La Verne, Harry Stockwell, Roy Atwell, Pinto Colvig, Otis Harlan, Scotty Mattraw, Billy Gilbert, Eddie Collins, Moroni Olsen & Stuart Buchanan

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    In Disney’s first feature-length animated production, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs tells the timeless tale of pure and innocent Snow White who fears for her life when her vile stepmother the Queen, seeks to eliminate her from becoming the fairest in the land.  In order to evade capture, Snow White falls in the kind company of seven mining dwarfs who open their hearts to the young girl.  Falling for a charming prince and combatting the evil Queen, love conquers all in this seminal classic.

    Garnering worldwide acclaim for his Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies short subjects, forward-thinking Walt Disney was determined to push his studio’s abilities further into uncharted territories.  Developed over an astounding four year period and predicted by many skeptics to be “Disney’s Folly”, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs would cost the thriving studio nearly $1.5 million on a project with unproven potential.  Inspired by Disney’s earliest cinematic encounters, the risky fairy tale adaptation would prompt Disney to mortgage his house and disregard the concerns of his wife Lillian and brother Roy in order to fully realize his vision.  Exploring new possibilities in the realm of animation and pushing his artists to the challenge of creating convincingly human characters, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs became a daily struggle with its completion being the embodiment of groundbreaking artistry.  

    Simplifying its narrative and dazzling viewers with its storybook opening into the Queen’s lair, achieved by the newly created multiplane camera system, sets a fantastical tone ensuring a journey of indubitable beauty.  From its awe-inspiring backgrounds to the scope of the Queen’s castle and the quaint comforts of the dwarfs cottage, the animated debut feature equally serves as a moving piece of high art as it does a compelling tale.  As Disney’s inaugural princess, Snow White is the definition of purity with her jovial spirit and harmonious singing of “I’m Wishing” melting the hearts of viewers.  Memorably joined by the colorful personalities of the short statured miners, the seven dwarfs, whether digging for diamonds and whistling while they work or questioning the benefits of washing up before mealtime, comprise the film’s many adorable sight gags.  In addition to Snow White’s scary dash through the forest, the Queen and her wicked ways deliver other such effectively dark sequences including, the infamous apple eating moment cementing the evildoers cold heart while, Snow White’s courageous love interest, the Prince, feels noticeably one-dimensional in a production bursting with unforgettable characters.  Spellbinding in all its gorgeous technicolor and sending audiences through a gamut of emotions, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs remains Disney’s unprecedented achievement that captured the hearts of millions nearly eight decades ago with its magic still firmly intact.  Nearly perfect (Disney’s sophomore effort, Pinocchio, being his true masterpiece), Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is an artistic marvel that will forever stand the test of time.

    Repurposing its gorgeous transfer from the previously available Diamond Edition, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in 1080p, sporting a 1.33:1 aspect ratio.  Free of any age-related scuffs or other such damage, Disney’s first fairy tale exudes perfection with bright colors leaping off the screen and handsome detail allowing viewers to further appreciate the glorious backgrounds.  In addition, black levels found in the Queen’s cape, the mischievous vultures and Snow White’s dash through the dreary forest are exceptionally inky.  Although no alterations are detected from its previous release, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs can appropriately be filed under the “if it’s not broke, don’t fix it” category.  Furthermore, DisneyView is once again included to optionally view the film with Toby Bluth’s (The Tigger Movie) artwork replacing the vertical black bars.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is prominently positioned with no distortion on hand.  Music is richly soothing while, the film’s climatic finale succeeds in drumming up appropriate excitement.  

    Newly included special features contain, In Walt’s Words: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (4:22), culled from archive recording interviews from 1956, Iconography (7:16) finds modern artists discussing the impact of the film’s long-lasting imagery and powerful symbolism.  In addition, @DisneyAnimation: Designing Disney’s First Princess (5:16) hosts Animator Mark Henn (Pocahontas), Art Directors Michael Giaimo (Frozen), Bill Schwab (Wreck-It Ralph) and Lorelay Bové (Big Hero 6) on the evolution of the film’s titular character and its striking design choices that continue to influence today, The Fairest Facts of Them All: All 7 Things You May Not Know About Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (4:37) hosted by Sofia Carson of Disney’s Descendants, Snow White in Seventy Seconds (1:12), Alternate Sequence: The Prince Meets Snow White (3:39) and Disney’s First Feature: The Making of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (33:15) serving as an extended version of a previously available featurette conclude the release’s latest offerings.  Meanwhile, vintage supplements include, an Audio Commentary with Roy E. Disney and Historian John Canemaker with recordings by Walt Disney, Bringing Snow White to Life (11:35), Hyperion Studios Tour (30:36), Decoding the Exposure Sheet (6:49), Story Meetings: The Dwarfs (5:51), Story Meetings: The Huntsman (3:55), Deleted Scene: Soup Eating Sequence (6:28) and Animation Voice Talent (6:20).  Finally, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), The Disney Store (0:32), Disney Parks (0:32), Zootopia (1:38) and The Good Dinosaur (1:38) are included with a DVD edition of the release and, for the first time ever, a Digital HD Code.

    Appropriately kickstarting Disney’s new Signature Collection, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is the defining tale that gave immediate acceptance to the animated feature.  Magical, frightening and heartwarming, the endearing classic not only stands as one of the mediums finest achievements but, also one of cinema’s most prized efforts.  Boasting its same spectacular presentation from its 2009 Diamond Edition release, newly included supplements join a plethora of vintage content for a satisfyingly packed high-def sophomore outing.  Mirror, mirror on the wall, Disney appreciators and lovers of all cinema should not fathom being without Disney’s essential first feature.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available February 2nd from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Tomorrowland (2015) Blu-ray Review

    Tomorrowland (2015)

    Director: Brad Bird

    Starring: George Clooney, Hugh Laurie, Britt Robertson & Raffey Cassidy

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From the director of The Incredibles and Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol, Tomorrowland brings former boy-genius Frank Walker (George Clooney, Up in the Air) and curious teenager Casey Newton (Britt Robertson, The Longest Ride) together for a mission to uncover a mysterious utopian realm that can salvage their own world’s future.  Hugh Laurie (House M.D.), Raffey Cassidy (Dark Shadows), Kathryn Hahn (Bad Words), Keegan-Michael Key (Key and Peele) and Tim McGraw (The Blind Side) co-star.

    Inspired by the limitless possibilities of a better tomorrow and Walt Disney’s own conceptual views for an innovative utopia, Tomorrowland brings viewers back to a simpler, more optimistic time where a young Frank Walker (Thomas Robinson, Harvey Beaks) brings his intelligent enthusiasm to the 1964 New York World’s Fair.  Although dismissed for his inventions impractical functionalities, Frank is charmed by Athena (Cassidy) who bestows upon him a mysterious pin leading him to a futuristic world unlike anything seen before.  With hope and promise within reach, present day optimist Casey Newton (Robertson) refuses to accept the declining climate of her world littered with global warming, wars and starvation while, searching for the answers to correct it.  Also granted with a similarly mysterious pin, Casey is given a glimpse into the euphoric world of tomorrow only to be pursued by crazed robots intent on eliminating her.  Joining forces with the eternally youthful-looking Athena and an elder Frank (Clooney), the trio travel to Tomorrowland to learn of an impending apocalyptic disaster claiming their world and must devise a way to change their futures.

    Cloaked in mystery and coyly promoted with a less is more approach, Tomorrowland is a refreshingly original concept that confronts today’s overly cynical audiences with a much needed dose of adventurous buoyancy.  A visual delight of futuristic landscapes and technological advancements, Director Brad Bird’s sci-fi opus delivers strong performances from the always dependable Clooney and his talented young co-stars Robertson and Cassidy.  In addition, Hugh Laurie’s portrayal of the cold-hearted Nix is accomplished with glee and well-executed dry humor.  Co-scripted by Damon Lindelof (Lost, Prometheus), structural issues unfortunately plague Tomorrowland’s action-packed pace with an abrupt halt that nearly severs its momentum.  Critically divided and failing to impress at the box-office, Tomorrowland remains a wondrous achievement that dares to be unique and generally succeeds.  While it may not be immune to imperfections, Tomorrowland will enchant audiences with repeated viewings and most assuredly grow in appreciation as the future nears.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Tomorrowland with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.20:1 aspect ratio.  Presenting a wide canvas of natural skin tones, space age vistas and flawless detail in costumes and exceptionally crisp black levels, Tomorrowland is a sight of perfection that deserves the moniker of high-definition reference material.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is excellently prioritized while the effective sound design and Composer Michael Giacchino’s (Super 8, Jurassic World) rousing score, which ranks as one of the year’s best, pushes the mix to exciting bounds.  Special features include, a Plus Ultra Short (3:18) to be played optionally before the feature, Remembering the Future: A Personal Journey Through Tomorrowland with Brad Bird (7:09), Casting Tomorrowland (7:27), A Great Big Beautiful Scoring Session (6:03), The World of Tomorrow Science Hour - Hosted by Futurologist David Nix (5:08) and an Animated Short: The Origins of Plus Ultra (3:36) which serves as a slightly extended version of its counterpart.  In addition, Brad Bird Production Diaries (4:34), a Blast from the Past Commercial (0:41), Deleted Scenes with Filmmaker Introductions (23:28) and Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Disney Parks (0:32), K.C. Undercover (0:32), Star Wars: The Force Awakens (1:52) and Inside Out are also included.  Furthermore, a DVD edition and Digital HD Code round out the release’s supplemental offerings.

    Escorted to a great big beautiful adventure, Tomorrowland impresses upon viewers the magical possibilities of a brighter future while bearing in mind the harsh conditions affecting our world today.  Bursting with originality and imagination, Director Brad Bird’s live-action sophomore effort is not without its faults but, ultimately triumphs.  Blasting to home video, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment awards Tomorrowland with reference worthy technical merits creating an out of this world viewing experience.  Transported to a world of unparalleled wonder, Tomorrowland will leave lasting impressions on those considered dreamers.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available October 13th from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Tomorrowland can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Cinderella (2015) Blu-ray Review

    Cinderella (2015)

    Director: Kenneth Branagh

    Starring: Lily James, Cate Blanchett, Richard Madden, Stellan Skarsgård & Helena Bonham Carter

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on the timeless fairy tale, Cinderella centers on kind-hearted Ella (Lily James, Downton Abbey) whose world is turned upside down following the passing of her father.  Reduced to the equivalent of a servant by her cruel stepmother and her dimwitted daughters, a chance encounter with the prince and a touch of magic restores hope to the enchanting young lady’s life.  Cate Blanchett (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), Richard Madden (Game of Thrones), Stellan Skarsgård (Thor) and Helena Bonham Carter (Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street) co-star.

    In the successful wake of Alice in Wonderland and Maleficent, Disney reaches new heights with their latest live-action revisionist tale of Cinderella.  Providing slightly more background on its title character than its 1950 animated counterpart, a young Ella is seen surrounded by her loving parents and picturesque household.  In a brief but charming appearance, Hayley Atwell (Agent Carter) as Cinderella’s mother urges her daughter to keep courage and kindness forever in her heart as she lie on her deathbed.  As years pass and Ella’s father learns to love anew, Lady Tremaine (Blanchett) and her two gaudy daughters move in, bringing with them a noticeable coldness towards Ella.  Away on business and falling ill, Ella’s father tragically passes away leaving his only daughter in the trenches of the now widowed Lady Tremaine.  Unloading an unspeakable wave of cruelty on her stepdaughter, Ella becomes the sole servant of the household, forced to wait on her wicked stepmother and selfish stepsisters.  Maintaining her promise to her late mother, Ella attempts to keep her spirits high while caring for friendly mice and always thinking of others first.  Overwhelmed with taunts by her new family leads Ella to a chance encounter with a dashing prince, known only as Kit (Madden).  Enraptured by her presence and urged by his father to wed a princess, Kit vows to see her again by inviting all citizens to the royal ball.  With the assistance of her magical Fairy Godmother (Bonham Carter), the newly nicknamed Cinderella enjoys a romantic evening with Kit, solidifying their love for one another.  With her royal-like appearance available for so long and fearing Kit’s reaction to her peasant status, Cinderella flees the castle as the definitive search for the prince’s true love unfolds.

    Beautifully realized, Director Kenneth Branagh’s captivating adaptation takes the simplistic fairy tale and enriches its narrative with majesty and rich visual grandeur.  Perfectly selected, Lily James casts a spell on viewers with her dizzying elegance as Cinderella while Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett offers humanizing new depth to the detestable Lady Tremaine.  Complimented by lush costume design by Sandy Powell (Shakespeare in Love, The Aviator) and gorgeous production design by Dante Ferretti (Gangs of New York, Hugo), Cinderella is the nearest example of a fairy tale come true.  Abundantly faithful to its animated predecessor, Cinderella manages to weave its own identity that can safely be praised and cherished as Disney’s finest reimagining to date.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents Cinderella with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.39:1 aspect ratio.  Much like its protagonist, picture quality is perfect in virtually every way.  Skin tones are warm and inviting while, the wide spectrum of colors found in costumes, most noticeably in Cinderella’s sparkling blue gown, pop beautifully.  Meanwhile, detail from settings to computer-generated creations are crisp with black levels always appearing deep and inky.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, dialogue is flawless while more intense moments involving horseback chases and Composer Patrick Doyle’s (Brave) rousing score gives listeners a most exceptional soundscape.  Special features include, A Fairy Tale Comes to Life (9:23) where key talent including Producer Simon Kinberg, Director Kenneth Branagh, Screenwriter Chris Weitz and the cast discuss the impact of the timeless tale and the opportunities their adaptation has to add to its legacy.  In addition, Costume Test Fun (2:39), Staging the Ball (11:27), where the various creative departments discuss their roles in realizing the film’s key sequence, an Alternate Opening: Ella’s Childhood (3:02), Ella’s Fury Friends (3:43) and Frozen Fever (7:56), the Frozen inspired short film attached to the film during its theatrical release are also included.  Finally, Sneak Peeks at Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Disney Parks (1:02), Once Upon A Time (0:31), Monkey Kingdom (1:02), Born in China (1:14) and Inside Out (1:27) round out the supplements while, a DVD edition of the film and Digital HD Code also accompany the release.

    Bursting with magic and whimsy, Cinderella, while adjusting minor components, pays homage to Disney’s iconic animated masterpiece to deliver an even finer film.  Masterfully casted and beautifully designed, Disney’s latest live-action redo is a splendid accomplishment that will leave viewers entranced.  Exceptional looking with a vigorous sound mix, Cinderella sparkles in high-definition confidently leaving viewers of all ages happily ever after.

    RATING: 5/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Cinderella can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • American Experience: Walt Disney (2015) DVD Review

    American Experience: Walt Disney (2015)

    Director: Sarah Colt

    Starring: Various

    Released by: PBS Distribution

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    In PBS’ exhaustive documentary of their long-running series, American Experience: Walt Disney centers on the polarizing man who dared to wish upon a dream and built an empire of magic and timeless entertainment.  From his early beginnings in the midwest to the development of his own successful studio and beyond, Disney’s complexities and enduring legacy are discussed through countless interviews with biographers, animators and historians in this detailed document of one of the greatest visionaries of all-time.  

    Narrated by Oliver Platt (Bicentennial Man), American Experience: Walt Disney takes viewers back to the cherished midwest origins of Disney where his initial attraction to animation and filmmaking began.  Boldly teaching himself how to crudely animate, Disney, along with noted animation veteran Ub Iwerks, opened his own moderately successful studio before making the leap to Tinseltown.  Joining forces with elder brother Roy, the Disney brothers opened their own new studio leading to the successful Alice’s Adventures shorts before his most popular creation, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, was swindled away from him by a blindsiding producer.  Driven by determination and sticktoitiveness, Disney’s creation of the rebelliously good-natured Mickey Mouse would become an icon to the public with popularity of the character’s technologically advanced sound cartoons booming.  Obsessed with pushing the boundaries of the art form, the Disney Studios quickly became a haven for hungry talent yearning to create within the walls of this unprecedented imagination factory.  As his Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies shorts infused color and other techniques, Disney continued to look towards the future.  Once considered not real art by critics, Disney and his talented stable of artists dazzled audiences worldwide with the first feature-length animated film, 1937’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.  Following up his landmark opus, Disney’s studio churned out other golden age classics including, Pinocchio, Fantasia, Bambi and Dumbo, each with vastly different styles but, all equally gorgeous representations of the now respected animated narrative.  

    While Disney’s many accomplishments are profiled in detail, Producer/Director Sarah Colt’s intimate look takes closer examination of the man himself and his strained relationship with his father, the financial woes struck by the studio during wartime and the animator’s strike of 1941 that Disney saw as a personal betrayal.  Crafting a humanizing portrait of the man many simply referred to as Walt, American Experience: Walt Disney delivers a deeply honest retelling of a brilliant yet, flawed individual told through interviews with Biographer Neal Gabler, Composer Richard Sherman, Veteran Imagineer Marty Sklar, Disney’s son-in-law Ron Miller and more.  As decades past, Disney’s ability to continuously revolutionize never waned in his later years as the legendary tycoon brought his whimsy to television screens across the country while crafting his most ambitious project of all, Disneyland.  Always delighted at the prospect of creating, Disney longed to develop an environment for families where fantasy ruled and the worries of reality were left behind.  Much like his impact in film and television, Disney changed the aspect of vacationing that continues to be felt nearly 50 years after his death.  Enthralling and inspiring, American Experience: Walt Disney stands as one of the most balanced and comprehensive examinations of Disney, allowing viewers to not only hold his many accomplishments in higher regard but, gain a stronger understanding of the American icon like never before.

    Presented in its 1.78:1 aspect ratio, American Experience: Walt Disney presents its newly shot interviews with a genuine sharpness that satisfies.  Although vintage footage of its subject alters in quality, clips from Disney’s many animated features arrive with nicely represented colors.  Equipped with a Dolby Digital 5.1 mix, dialogue is clean and audible during interview sequences while, sound clips of Disney from decades past can be mildly hissy but, surprisingly still in fine shape for their age.  In addition, no special features have been included on this release.

    Cherished and complex, Walt Disney’s ideals and achievements continue to shape a culture still enamored by the game-changing genius.  Amidst criticism of over-sentimentality, Disney’s legacy thrives with new generations charmed by his revolutionary works and immersive worlds of fantasy.  Nearly four hours long and standing proudly with Bob Thomas’ “Walt Disney: An American Original”, American Experience: Walt Disney is an expertly crafted document juggling the flaws and unwavering optimism of one of history’s most creative minds.  Fascinating and personal, American Experience: Walt Disney is an essential work of striking depth for devoted Disney enthusiasts.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Premiering on PBS September 14th-15th and available on DVD September 15th, American Experience: Walt Disney can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection (2015) Blu-ray Review

    Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection (2015)

    Director(s): Various

    Starring: Various

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Presented for the first time together, the Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection welcomes a dozen of Disney’s most revered short subjects spanning the last 15 years.  From the Hans Christian Andersen inspired The Little Matchgirl to the Academy Award winning Paperman and the most recent Frozen Fever, the Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection boasts a profound mix of animation styles and masterful storytelling perfected by Disney’s talented artists.  

    Since Disney’s commitment to resurrect theatrical shorts in 2006, the ability to experiment with groundbreaking techniques and tell unique tales have been met with overwhelming praise.  Treating audiences to an entertaining appetizer ahead of the studio’s latest feature film, Disney’s driven talent strives to push themselves to new limits with each new endeavor.  From the rarely discussed John Henry pitting the classic figure’s brute strength against machine to the beautifully realized Lorenzo and his cursed tail, each short promises wildly unique executions in their limited runtime.  Director Roger Allers’ (The Lion King) The Little Matchgirl is equally breathtaking and heartbreaking while, Goofy’s hilarious attempts to upgrade his home entertainment system in How to Hook Up Your Home Theater stands proudly with other classic Goofy shorts.  In addition, Tick Tock Tale, akin to Pixar’s Toy Story, cleverly showcases the mysterious lives of clocks when no one is looking while, Prep & Landing - Operation: Secret Santa finds the expert duo pulling off a near impossible holiday mission on behalf of Mrs. Claus.  

    Although each short’s animation is gorgeous and ever-changing, the collection’s weaker entries are found in the rather bland The Ballad of Nessie and surprisingly, the prominently promoted Frozen Fever.  Unquestionably following up on the box-office success of its feature, Elsa hurries to prep Anna’s birthday bash while combatting a cold that welcomes a slew of miniaturized snowmen to Arendelle.  Equipped with a new song by Robert Lopez and Kristen-Anderson Lopez, the short pales in comparison to the rest of the collection with an eye-rolling reference to the original film’s popular hit “Let It Go” feeling tacky.  Meanwhile, Tangled Ever After finds Maximus and Pascal in a comical misadventure to retrieve Rapunzel and Flynn’s wedding rings, blending high-stakes and sight gags along the way.  While the greater majority are vastly entertaining, the Academy Award winning trio of Paperman, Get A Horse! and Feast are the true stars of the collection with their cutting edge techniques paying homage to Mickey Mouse’s earliest roots, a chance encounter of love and the heartwarming appetite of a puppy and his owner.  Bursting with originality and charm, the Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection belongs in all animation buff’s libraries.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents the Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection with 1080p transfers, boasting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  Bursting with colorful boldness and perfect clarity, the various animation techniques leap off the screen with flawless definition.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix, each short relays crisp dialogue levels while, music and sound effects of varying degree are captured with ease and robustness.  Special features include newly filmed introductions to each short by their makers, @DisneyAnimation: The Short Story About Shorts Hosted by T.J. Miller (7:18) finds the Big Hero 6 voice actor sitting down for a brief but, informative conversation with several crew members of the various short films.  In addition, Sneak Peeks for Disney Movie Rewards (0:20), Disney Movies Anywhere (0:40), Aladdin Diamond Edition (1:19) and Disneynature’s Born in China (1:14) are included along with a DVD edition of the release and a Digital HD Code.  

    While several of the shorts have already been made available on other Disney releases, the Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection still makes for a delightful addition into any Disney lovers collection.  Comprised of some of the finest works to be released in recent years, each short hosts exceptional animation styles that will leave viewers overwhelmed by their unbounded artistry.  Presented with pristine technical qualities, the Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection captures some of the most beloved short subjects all in one convenient compilation.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available August 18th from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, the Walt Disney Animation Studios Short Films Collection can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • Big Hero 6 (2014) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    Big Hero 6 (2014)

    Director(s): Don Hall & Chris Williams

    Starring: Ryan Potter, Scott Adsit, T.J. Miller, Jamie Chung & Damon Wayans Jr.

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Combining the action and adventure of Marvel Comics with the heart and style of Disney animation, Big Hero 6 focuses on the young Hiro Hamada (voiced by Ryan Potter, Senior Project) after a devastating accident costs his older brother’s life.  Comforted by Baymax, a lovable robotic health companion, Hiro, with the help of his loyal friends, become an unlikely group of superheroes, determined to bring a diabolical villain to justice.  Scott Adsit (30 Rock), Daniel Henney (X-Men Origins: Wolverine), T.J. Miller (Silicon Valley), Jamie Chung (Sucker Punch), Damon Wayans Jr. (New Girl), Genesis Rodriguez (Tusk), Maya Rudolph (Bridesmaids), Alan Tudyk (Frozen) and James Cromwell (The Green Mile) provide voice talent.

    Following up on the massive success of Frozen, Walt Disney Animation Studios would take full advantage of the recently acquired Marvel Comics for inspiration.  Deviating from its comic book source material, Big Hero 6 would become the first animated Disney production to incorporate Marvel characters into its timeless tradition that has birthed such classics as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to the more recent Wreck-It Ralph.  Carving out a tale with a strong emphasis on brotherly relationships, child prodigy Hiro Hamada mourns the death of his older brother, Tadashi, with the help and comfort of Baymax, a robotic nurse developed by Tadashi before his passing.  After learning of a kabuki mask-wearing villain who is violating Hiro’s own groundbreaking technology, the young genius is certain his brother’s death was no accident.  Upgrading Baymax and himself with state of the art armor, Hiro drafts Tadashi’s college friends to aid him in bringing the masked man down.  Encompassing a unique group of individuals including, speed demon Go Go (Chung), safety cautious Wasabi (Wayans Jr.), chemistry ditz Honey Lemon (Rodriguez) and comic nerd Fred (Miller), Hiro forms a team of six unlike any other before.  Filled with hilarious humor and emotional depth, Big Hero 6 flies with soaring colors in virtually every department.  The loss of Tadashi and Hiro’s immediate melancholy tugs at viewers before melting their hearts away at the introduction of the cuddly Baymax.  Adorably clumsy and endlessly caring, Baymax is the breakout character of the film that will leave audiences delighted for knowing him.  

    With solid characters and top-notch action sequences, Big Hero 6 may be slightly predictable in its narrative but, never quits entertaining.  From the cocktail blending setting of San Fransokyo to the brightly colored eye-candy costume designs, the film’s visuals leave a lasting impression and undeniable mark of the highest quality that Disney animation is accustomed to.  Critically acclaimed and taking the best of both Marvel and Disney’s imaginative worlds, Big Hero 6 is a resounding success that takes viewers on a sky high ride of excitement and fun.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment debuts Big Hero 6 with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.39:1 aspect ratio.  Expectedly, vibrant colors burst off the screen in every shot with picture perfect clarity always on display.  Showcasing exceptional inky black levels in Hiro’s microbot creations and its antagonists‘ black attire, Big Hero 6 is nothing short of perfect.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, the film’s soundtrack is yet another work of flawlessness with crisp dialogue levels, explosive action sequences handled accordingly and music, including Fall Out Boy’s “Immortals” title track, offering a solid bass sound that will leave you bopping to the beat.  Special features included are the Oscar nominated theatrical short Feast (6:13).  Marking the directorial debut of Patrick Osbourne (Tangled, Paperman), this uplifting tale focuses on the relationship of an adorable puppy and his owner throughout the years.  Without question one of the finest Disney shorts to emerge in recent years, Feast will leave you teary-eyed and longing to hold your own K9 best friend.  Furthermore, The Origin of Big Hero 6: Hiro’s Journey (15:10), hosted by Jamie Chung (Go Go), finds Directors Don Williams & Chris Williams, Producer Roy Conli and other creative talent discussing the film’s early beginnings and the long road to its completion.  Big Animator 6: The Characters Behind the Characters (6:39) sits down with the animation team as they discuss their earliest passions for animation and their specific roles in the production.  In addition, Deleted Scenes with Introductions by Directors Don Hall & Chris Williams (13:10), a Big Hero 6 Theatrical Teaser (1:41) and a Sneak Peeks reel including promos for Disney Movie Rewards, Disney Infinity 2.0, Star Wars Rebels and Star Wars: The Clone Wars - The Lost Missions are included with a DVD edition and Digital HD Code rounding out the supplemental features.

    Yet another knockout effort for Walt Disney Animation Studios, Big Hero 6 packs heart, humor and action with outstanding results.  Crafting an important focus on brothers and friendship, the Marvel Comics adaptation is an often touching piece of stunning animation, sealed by its well-received characters.  Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment issues their Oscar nominated opus with impeccable technical features and a decent lineup of bonus content including, the also Oscar nominated and highly recommend short, Feast.  Released theatrically in 3D, Big Hero 6 is unfortunately the latest contemporary Disney release to not carry its extra dimensions over for home viewing, much to the dismay of enthusiastic fans.  Regardless, the strength and sheer entertainment factor of Big Hero 6 and its fabulous presentation on Blu-ray allows it to pack a solid punch for the whole family.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available February 24th from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Big Hero 6 can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • 101 Dalmatians (1961) Diamond Edition Blu-ray Review

    101 Dalmatians (1961)

    Director(s): Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton S. Luske & Wolfgang Reitherman

    Starring: Rod Taylor, Cate Bauer, J. Pat O’Malley, Betty Lou Gerson & Ben Wright

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Based on Dodie Smith’s beloved 1956 children’s novel, 101 Dalmatians centers on an adorable litter of dalmatian puppies as they are kidnapped by the bumbling accomplices of the wicked, fur-obsessed Cruella De Vil.  Determined to retrieve their children, Pongo and Perdita, with the assistance of other fellow city animals, brave their London surroundings before the puppies fall victim to Cruella’s cruel fashion fixation.  Rod Taylor (The Time Machine), Cate Bauer (The Third Man), J. Pat O’Malley (The Jungle Book), Betty Lou Gerson (The Fly), Ben Wright (The Sound of Music) & Lisa David (Queen of Outer Space) provide vocal talent.

    Struggling after the box-office failure of Sleeping Beauty, Walt Disney heavily considered shutting down his animation division fearing its increased expenses would destroy the studio.  Nevertheless, Disney rebuffed the idea, remaining loyal to the artistry that his very empire was founded on and righteously continued to move forward.  After falling in love with Smith’s original novel, Disney quickly snatched up the rights, finding the property a perfect fit for his studio to weave their animated wizardry.  Cost conscience as ever, Ub Iwerks, in charge of special processes, modified a Xerox camera allowing drawings to be transferred directly to cels, saving immeasurable time and capital for the studio.  Able to capture the spontaneity of the animators work, 101 Dalmatians has more in common visually with the loose, free-spirited style of Dumbo than the delicate precision of Cinderella.  Told through the perspective of dalmatians Pongo and Perdita, 101 Dalmatians charms the viewer with cuddly characters and yet another memorable antagonist in Cruella De Vil.  Skeletal-looking and draped in a gaudy fur coat with a slimline cigarette holder always in hand, Cruella De Vil is the genius of Disney Legend Marc Davis whose endless talents brought such characters as Snow White, Alice, Tinker Bell and of course, Maleficent to life.  In addition, the film’s contemporary London setting, gorgeously realized by Production Designer Ken Anderson (Sleeping Beauty, The Aristocats), is a stunning sight, once again stylistically different from previous animated Disney productions but, perfectly fitting.  Aided by the support of several other local animals, the puppies are able to evade their dimwitted captors via hilarious, slap-sticking means retaining the heart and humor audiences have come to expect from a Walt Disney production.

    While, the film would prove to be a smashing success becoming the highest grossing film of 1961, Disney was apparently unhappy with the look and style of the finished product.  Meanwhile, audiences have adored the film for its noticeably unique animation, humorous characters and memorable songs, most famously “Cruella De Vil”, from famed songwriter Mel Leven.  Serving as one of the final animated films released under Walt Disney’s supervision before his untimely death in 1966, 101 Dalmatians has stood the test of time as a bonafide Disney classic where it will most assuredly remain for another 101 years and beyond.

    Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment presents 101 Dalmatians with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.33:1 aspect ratio.  Admittedly, there is minor digital tinkering at hand on the transfer, removing instances of natural grain making way for an intendedly squeaky clean presentation.  Far from deal-breaking, 101 Dalmatians still stuns in high-definition with bold colors, inky black levels, most appreciatively in Cruella’s hair and of course, the dalmatians‘ endless spots, along with fine detail allowing the viewer to appreciate the animators looser than usual pencil lines.  A solid sight from start to finish, 101 Dalmatians has never looked quite as vibrant before.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, 101 Dalmatians satisfies once again with crisp dialogue levels and the film’s soothing jazzy score nicely handled throughout its runtime.  No noticeable instances of hiss or distortion were heard throughout this well-handled mix.  In addition, the film’s original Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono mix has also been included for your listening pleasure.  Celebrating its Diamond Edition status, newly added special features include viewing the film in optional DisneyView which incorporates artsy panels to fill out the otherwise black bars as the film plays, The Further Adventures of Thunderbolt, a brief episode of the Thunderbolt television show the puppies view in the actual film (1:46), Lucky Dogs interviews several Disney alumni including Floyd Norman, Lisa Davis, Burny Mattinson, Carmen Sanderson and more as they discuss what working at the studio was like (9:08), Dalmatians 101: Hosted by Cameron Royce finds Royce, star of The Disney Channel’s upcoming Descendants as he counts down the top five coolest anecdotes about 101 Dalmatians (5:20).  In addition, the best treat of the new supplements is Walt Disney Presents: “The Best Doggoned Dog in the World” (1961 Version), a vintage episode of the memorable television series presented in HD (51:05).  Finally, the Diamond Edition ports over the following classic bonus features from its previous DVD release with Redefining the Line: The Making of 101 Dalmatians (33:55), Cruella De Vil: Drawn to Be Bad (7:10), Sincerely Yours, Walt Disney (12:48), several Trailers and TV Spots (7:80), Promotional Radio Spots (1:40) and Music & More (33:46).  Finally, Sneak Peeks for Disney Movie Rewards, Disney Parks, Dog With a Blog, Star Wars: The Clone Wars - The Lost Missions, Big Hero 6 and Tinker Bell and the Legend of the Neverbeast round out the bonus content.

    Long considered a Disney classic, 101 Dalmatians is unquestionably one of the finest efforts the Disney Studio produced in the 1960s, cementing its appeal with later generations through successful re-releases, a live-action remake, an animated television series and a belated direct-to-video animated sequel.  Possessing a stylistic departure from animated efforts before it, 101 Dalmatians is a dazzling sight with a story filled with charm and substance to match.  101 Dalmatians Diamond Edition makes its long-anticipated domestic Blu-ray debut with a colorfully bursting transfer, quaint sound mix and a robust spread of special features, both newly produced and vintage, that total over two hours worth of content.  Heart-filled and humorous, 101 Dalmatians Diamond Edition is essential for Disney devotees and animation aficionados alike.  

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available February 10th, 101 Dalmatians Diamond Edition can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • Maleficent (2014) Blu-ray Review

    Maleficent (2014)

    Director: Robert Stromberg

    Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley, Juno Temple & Sam Riley

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Paying homage to their own legacy, the Mouse House invites you to take a closer look at one of its most vile antagonists.  Marking the directorial debut of Academy Award-winning Art Director Robert Stromberg (Avatar, Alice in Wonderland), experience the fairy tale you thought you knew.  With a screenplay by Linda Woolverton (Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King) and a magnificently sinister performance from Angelina Jolie (Changeling), Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment welcomes you to the evil beginning of Maleficent.

    Reimagining the 1959 Disney classic, Sleeping Beauty, Angelina Jolie stars as the scorned fairy Maleficent.  Bestowing an evil curse on the king’s newborn daughter, Aurora (Elle Fanning, Super 8), Maleficent finds herself conflicted among rival kingdoms as the young princess matures.  Before long, she realizes Aurora may be the key in a life-altering course of action for both of their worlds.  Sharlto Copley (District 9), Juno Temple (Sin City: A Dame to Kill For), Sam Riley (Control) and Brenton Thwaites (The Giver) co-star.


    Retaining several moments of the iconic animated film, Maleficent strives and succeeds in becoming its own beast.  Providing a thorough backstory for the famed villain, the viewer is granted access into the tragic events that would propel Maleficent on her downward spiral.  Once a beautiful, winged fairy, Maleficent is betrayed by Stefan (Copley), her sole human friend with whom she grew to love.  Fueled by greed and the succession of the king, Stefan robs Maleficent of her prized possessions, causing a dark cloud of despair to emerge between their kingdoms.  Echoing the classic setup of Sleeping Beauty, Maleficent, now riled with hate, casts an unbreakable curse on King Stefan’s daughter, Princess Aurora (Fanning), to compensate for what was taken from her.  While, the three good fairies tasked with keeping Aurora safe appear, albeit by different names, they are far more clumsy and neglectful than their animated counterparts.  Meanwhile, Maleficent, along with her raven-morphing servant Diaval (Riley), keep a watchful eye on the young child, inadvertently becoming her unofficial fairy godmother and develop an unexpected relationship.  Channeling the demeanor of Eleanor Audley’s performance, Angelina Jolie stuns as the horned fairy, adding a new layer of sympathy and elegance to the role.  In addition, the natural beauty and charm of Elle Fanning raises the rather shallow Aurora to new heights, providing a genuine connection with the audience.  As King Stefan’s paranoia and fear escalates, a war between his kingdom and Maleficent is imminent.  Stunning visual effects and gorgeous art direction send the characters through intense battle sequences that rival those in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings franchise.  Continuing to evolve, Maleficent injects plenty of unique twists in its final act that will firmly separate itself from its predecessor.

    Hailing from an esteemed visual effects and art direction background, first time director Robert Stromberg successfully brings a fairy tale to life with rich colors and fanciful environments.  Disney alumni Linda Woolverton’s screenplay captures the essence of the original tale while, providing a whole new light on a mysteriously misunderstood character.  Exciting and magical, Maleficent gives new meaning to one of Disney’s most evil and equally beloved villainess’ with relatable themes and arresting performances.

    RATING: 4.5/5


    Maleficent arrives with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 2.40:1 aspect ratio.  Engulfed in a fantasy world of lavish colors and computer-generated creatures, Maleficent casts an immediate spell of quality.  The cheery, warm complexion of Fanning to the pale, porcelain skin tone of Jolie comes through remarkably.  In addition, colorful details ranging from Jolie’s glowing green eyes and Copley’s prosthetic scars pop with clarity.  Maleficent, cloaked in inky black gowns and hidden in shadows, registers beautifully with no crushing or disruptive noise to be found.  Disney has graciously provided viewers with a bewitching visual experience that is nothing short of magnificent.

    RATING: 5/5


    Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, Maleficent sounds wickedly solid in all areas.  From Janet McTeer’s soft-spoken narration to the thunderous battle cries, dialogue is always crisp and well balanced.  The roaring sounds of Maleficent’s wings and blazes of inferno offer strong emphasis with a firm force.  From quieter, more character driven moments to the evil fairies roaring conjuring of spells, Maleficent hits every note perfectly.

    RATING: 5/5


    • Aurora: Becoming a Beauty (4:53): Actress Elle Fanning offers her personal experiences growing up with Sleeping Beauty and her approaches to differentiate Aurora from the original film.  Star Angelina Jolie and Producer Joe Roth also provide insight.

    • From Fairy Tale to Feature Film (8:13): Angelica Jolie, Screenwriter Linda Woolverton, Executive Producer Palak Patel, Director Robert Stromberg and others address the challenges reinventing the classic fairy tale from the antagonists’ perspective.

    • Building An Epic Battle (5:48): Screenwriter Linda Woolverton and Producer Joe Roth discuss the staging and complexities of shooting the first act battle sequence with insight from Stunt Coordinator Eunice Huthart, SFX Supervisor Michael Dawson and Senior VFX Supervisor Carey Villegas.

    • Classic Couture (1:34): Millinery Designer Justin Smith provides voiceover, explaining the making of Maleficent’s head mask and various accessories.

    • Maleficent Revealed (4:45): A montage of several scenes from their onsite filming appearance to their finalized, effects heavy, completion.

    • Deleted Scenes: Stefan in King’s Chamber (2:34), Pixies Seek Asylum (1:51), Pixie Idiots (0:22), Diaval Asks about The Curse (1:00) and Suitor (0:51).

    • Sneak Peeks: Promos for Disney Parks, Star Wars Rebels, Once Upon a Time and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. The Complete First Season.

    • DVD Edition

    • Digital HD Code

    RATING: 3.5/5


    Containing the rough structure of Disney’s 1959 classic, Maleficent dared to be unique and succeeded, creating a box-office smash.  Perfectly cast, Angelina Jolie captures the beauty, mystery and suffering of the horned fairy with a wonderfully layered backstory.  Briskly told and gorgeously designed, Director Robert Stromberg along with Screenwriter Linda Woolverton, carry the magic of Disney animation into the live-action world.  As wonderful as the film itself, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment have bestowed a gorgeous Blu-ray with flawless detail and strong audio specifications.  While, the included special features are decent, covering various degrees of the production, a domestic 3D Blu-ray release is unfortunately lacking for this visually delightful film.  Nonetheless, Maleficent is a wickedly fun time with compelling performances and brilliant production value that Disney enthusiasts will find enchanting.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available November 4thMaleficent can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • Sleeping Beauty Diamond Edition (1959) Blu-ray Review

    Sleeping Beauty (1959)

    Director: Clyde Geronimi

    Starring: Mary Costa, Bill Shirley, Eleanor Audley, Verna Felton, Barbara Luddy & Barbara Jo Allen 

    Released by: Disney

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Marking the final animated fairy-tale to be produced in Walt Disney’s lifetime, Sleeping Beauty has charmed viewers for 55 years with its enchanting artistry and the inclusion of one of its most memorable villains.  Celebrating this animation milestone, Disney proudly welcomes Sleeping Beauty into its prestigious Diamond Edition line and allowing viewers to experience Princess Aurora’s tale like never before.  Available for a limited time, re-experience the magic and wonder of this timeless Disney classic.

    Sleeping Beauty opens on the birth of King Stefan and Queen Leah’s baby daughter, Aurora.  After the evil, unwanted fairy Maleficent places a deadly curse on Princess Aurora, three good fairies, Flora, Fauna and Merryweather, plan to protect her.  Unfortunately, as Maleficent’s will grows stronger, only true love will save the young Princess from certain doom.


    Perfectly achieving Disney’s intended desire of medieval art, Sleeping Beauty would reach soaring new artistic heights that are still marveled at to this day.  Deemed the most expensive Disney feature at the time, costing an astounding $6 million, Sleeping Beauty would ultimately fail to recoup its budget at the box-office.  Often criticized for its lack of character development, Sleeping Beauty has effectively cast its charming spell on viewers for decades, earning praise as one of Disney’s most beloved animated features.  While, Princess Aurora may suffer from being far too two-dimensional at times, it is Disney Artist Eyvind Earle’s color styling and design skills that keep Sleeping Beauty a sight to behold.  In addition, Marc Davis‘ design and execution of the evil Maleficent is the true showstopper of the film, casting a brooding cloud of melancholy in every scene.  In addition, comical interactions amongst the three good fairies and an exciting battle sequence between Prince Phillip and Maleficent, in dragon form, sends Sleeping Beauty off on a breathtaking high note.

    In production for nearly a decade before debuting, Sleeping Beauty stands proudly as one of Disney Animation’s finest efforts.  A slice of artistic perfection, Sleeping Beauty is not only viewed as a cinematic landmark, but its impact is firmly cemented in the original Disneyland where Sleeping Beauty’s Castle serves as its central icon.  Experiencing a new generation of recognition courtesy of Disney’s live-action Maleficent feature film, Sleeping Beauty remains a timeless tale that only occurs once upon a dream.

    RATING: 4.5/5


    Sleeping Beauty arrives with a 1080p transfer, capturing its original 2.55:1 aspect ratio.  Viewers searching for drastic differences in Disney’s Diamond Edition and their previous 50th Anniversary Platinum Edition release won’t find any.  Repurposing the six-year old transfer is hardly a negative as its existing appearance is quite remarkable. Colors are always bright and bold, the exquisite backgrounds are pristinely detailed and black levels impress with no crushing to be found whatsoever.  While, some digital tinkering may be at use, it is never harshly overused and stands as a solid example of how to properly execute its purpose.  Simply put, Sleeping Beauty looks perfect, leaving viewers beyond satisfied.

    RATING: 5/5


    Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix, Disney once again repurposes the existing mix from the 50th Anniversary Platinum Edition.  No cause for alarm as the mix relays crisp dialogue, effective sound effects and beautifully balanced music from Tchaikovsky.  Intense sequences taking place at Maleficent’s dark castle and her final battle with Prince Phillip offer some of the tracks finest moments with wide, booming authority.  Complimenting the impressive video transfer, Sleeping Beauty’s audio treatment will easily delight.  

    RATING: 5/5 


    While, severely lacking several special features from the 50th Anniversary Platinum Edition, Disney has ported over the impressive audio commentary featuring Film Historian Leonard Maltin, Supervising Animator Andreas Deja and Chief Creative Officer of Pixar & Disney Animation John Lasseter.  In addition, three featurettes, The Sound of Beauty: Restoring A Classic (10:50), Picture Perfect: The Making of Sleeping Beauty (43:32) and Eyvind Earle: A Man and His Art (7:33) have also been carried over.  Meanwhile, the Diamond Edition has supplied the following new features:

    • Deleted Scene: The Curse is Fulfilled (2:58): An omitted scene told through storyboards as Aurora engages Maleficent, in disguise, at the spinning wheel.  

    • Deleted Scene: The Arrival of Maleficent (1:58): An alternate, storyboarded take of Maleficent’s grand entrance.

    • Deleted Scene: The Fair (7:48): The three good fairies cast a protection spell over the castle in order for Aurora to live in protection.  Bored, Aurora sneaks off to a local fair for some fun.

    • The Art of Evil: Generations of Disney Villains (9:49): Lino DiSalvo (Bolt, Frozen) and Andrea Deja (Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin) discuss iconic Disney antagonists as well Disney Legend Marc Davis’ countless contributions and talent.

    • @DisneyAnimation: Artists in Motion (4:27): Visual Development Artist, Brittney Lee (Wreck-It Ralph, Paperman), crafts an impressive model of Maleficent entirely out of paper. 

    • Once Upon a Parade (8:49): Sarah Hyland of Modern Family fame guides a group of children on a whimsical tour of Fantasyland and Walt Disney World’s latest Festival of Fantasy parade.

    • Beauty-Oke: “Once Upon A Dream” (2:32):  A sing-along segment featuring the iconic song.

    • Sneak Peeks

    • DVD Edition

    • Digital HD Code

    RATING: 3/5


    Although, lacking in more than several previously available special features, Sleeping Beauty Diamond Edition will be an obvious purchase for Disney completists.  Keeping the out of print 50th Anniversary Platinum Edition handy for obvious reasons, the Diamond Edition of Sleeping Beauty offers the same, pitch perfect A/V specifications with a decent spread of new supplemental features.  Nearly unmatched in its artistic aesthetic and ushering in one of the most iconic Disney villains, Sleeping Beauty is a visual marvel that continues to dazzle viewers over half a century later.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Sleeping Beauty Diamond Edition is available now and can be purchased through and other fine retailers.