Blu-ray/DVD Reviews


Currently showing posts tagged Zombies

  • Vampirina DVD Review


    Director(s): Various

    Starring: Isabella Crovetti, James Van Der Beek, Lauren Graham & Jordan Alexa Davis

    Released by: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Fangs never appeared more precious than in Disney Junior’s Vampirina.  Based on the book series by Anne Marie Pace, this brightly-colored animated series finds young Vampirina relocating to Pennsylvania from Transylvania and adapting to her new surroundings as a monster in a human’s world.  Presenting the program’s first four episodes consisting of two unique adventures each, Vampirina befriends her new next-door neighbors who graciously overlook her family’s monsterific appearances while, Vee’s parents attempt to open their own B&B without their spookier and more human clientele scaring one another off.  Befit with catchy musical numbers in each installment, Vampirina’s nerves get the best of her during the first day of school, an all-girls sleepover to win over Vee’s especially scaredy cat pal takes place while, Vampirina’s household conducts a different kind of surprise party and a viral video of Vee and best friend Poppy busting a move becomes a viral sensation leading to a dance off against Transylvania’s own Dragos the Dancer.  Featuring familiar voice talent from James Van Der Beek (Dawnson’s Creek) and Lauren Graham (Gilmore Girls) to Wanda Sykes (Alpha House) and Dee Bradley Baker (Star Wars Rebels), Vampirina, arriving just in time for the Halloween season, joining the ranks of the Disney Channel’s Hotel Transylvania: The Series, Vampirina that continues to fill the void of more spooky-centric content for preschoolers.

    Although the program’s intended demographic may not be the most vocal of videophiles, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment offers Vampirina in a 1.78:1 aspect ratio, relaying the blue skin tones of Vee and her family with crispness as well as the family’s gothic homestead with glowing allure.  Furthermore, the accompanied Dolby Digital 2.0 mixes on each episode are also perfectly serviceable making dialogue and song cuts an easy and satisfying listen.  Apart from  Sneak Peeks at Coco (1:38) and Disneynature’s Dolphins (1:17), no special features are included.  Pleasantly entertaining as much as it teaches valuable lessons about accepting others regardless of their appearances or social backgrounds, Vampirina is fangtastic fun for youngsters.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, Vampirina can be purchased via and other fine retailers. 

  • C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud (1989) Blu-ray Review

    C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud (1989)

    Director: David Irving

    Starring: Brian Robbins, Bill Calvert, Tricia Leigh Fisher, Gerrit Graham & Robert Vaughn

    Released by: Lionsgate

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    When a corpse used for a high school science experiment goes missing, C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud finds three best friends fearing for their grades as they snatch a decomposing cadaver infected with a cannibalistic virus.  Shortly after being resurrected, the undead army experiment gone wrong goes on a killing spree, adding townspeople to his ravenous flock and leaving the young trio to save the community from themselves!  Brian Robbins (Head of the Class), Bill Calvert (Terror Squad), Tricia Leigh Fisher (Pretty Smart), Gerrit Graham (Phantom of the Paradise) and Robert Vaughn (The Man from U.N.C.L.E.) star.

    Loosely borrowing from its more horror centric predecessor, C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud makes a swift tonal change, relying on laughs and enhanced camp to bring life to the formally underground dwellers once more.  Scripted by Ed Naha (Troll, Dolls) (under the pseudonym M. Kane Jeeves), the misleading mutant populated artwork stretches the truth as the monsters are simpler, fang-toothed zombie types whose bite spreads their plague to other unsuspecting suburbanites.  Panicking after losing the intended corpse for their science experiment, Steve (Robbins) and Kevin (Calvert) don’t hesitate in stealing a thought to be dead replacement from the local Center for Disease Control to salvage their grade.  Roping fellow friend Katie (Fisher) into the mix, an accidental electrocution reanimates the corpse known as Bud (Graham) who’s wildly hungry for human flesh.  Infecting the small town one victim at a time with army officials attempting to quietly and unsuccessfully contain the situation, the three teenagers must put an end to the madness as Bud leads his hungry, hungry pack to the local Halloween dance.  Lacking the gritty grime of its New York based original, the quirky followup’s fresh-faced stars fully embrace the last gasps of the Gen X decade to the amusement of viewers while, Gerrit Graham’s gruntingly hilarious performance as the deathly infected Bud make his physicality and peculiar face movements a hoot to be seen.  Climaxing at a swimming pool where the bikini-donning Katie lures the C.H.U.D. infected citizens to their frozen farewell, C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud by no means upstages its originator but, possesses a contagiously fun energy largely overlooked by cult cinema watching humanoids.

    Lionsgate presents C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Virtually free of scratches or other such anomalies, natural film grain is apparent while overall image quality reads mildly soft.  Skin tones are healthy with the film’s color scheme found in costumes, Bud’s simple make-up design and the teen’s favored burger joint popping nicely.  Discovered and predominately viewed during its VHS era, Bud devotees will be overly pleased with its new life on high-definition.  Supplied with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is satisfyingly captured with ease while, Emmy Award winning Composer Nicholas Pike’s (Graveyard Shift, Critters 2) score of synth and rock queues see noticeable rises on the track.  

    Graced with rewarding supplements as part of the Vestron Video Collector’s Series, extras include, an Audio Commentary with Director David Irving, moderated by Michael Felsher of Red Shirt Pictures, Bud Speaks! with Gerrit Graham (16:18) where the actor reflects on how he never imagined his career to be so permeated by horror/cult credits, his improvisational background, the freedom of having no dialogue in the film and his embracement of the role’s physicality.  Furthermore, Katie’s Kalamity with Tricia Leigh Fisher (12:45) catches up with the actress today as she recalls many laughs shared onset with her costars Robbins and Calvert, praise for Graham’s campy performance and a humorous story during the shoot when a day trip to a local amusement park resulted in countless messages being left on her answering machine ordering her to the set.  Finally, This C.H.U.D.’s For You! with Allan Apone (14:44) hosts the special effects artist as he discusses the experimental freedom working on horror films in the 80s while, a Video Trailer (1:47) and Still Gallery (6:20) round out the bonus features.

    A comedic changeup that substitutes the humanoid monsters from New York for razor-toothed zombies with three science failing high schoolers tasked to clean up the mess, C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud is built for absurdity and generally wets the appetite of bad movie appreciators.  Making its high-definition debut alongside the timely release of its 1984 original, the Vestron Video Collector’s Series continues to spread the genre love high and low with its treatment of this bottom-dwelling sequel sure to make most stiffs wiggle with glee.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available November 22nd from Lionsgate, C.H.U.D. II: Bud the Chud can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • Assault on New Releases #11 - Halloween Edition: Count Dracula's Great Love (1973), Child's Play (1988) Collector's Edition, Burial Ground (1980), Waxwork (1988) / Waxwork II: Lost in Time (1991) & Lady in White (1988) Blu-ray Reviews

    Count Dracula’s Great Love (1973)

    Director: Javier Aguirre

    Starring: Paul Naschy, Rosanna Yanni, Haydée Politoff, Mirta Miller, Ingrid Garbo, Álvaro de Luna de Luma & José Manuel Martin

    Released by: Vinegar Syndrome

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Starring Spain’s premiere horror star Paul Naschy (Night of the Werewolf), Count Dracula’s Great Love finds a carriage of travelers derailed and kindly taken in by the handsome Dr. Marlow (Naschy).  Secretly harboring his true identity as the Prince of Darkness, Marlow stalks and seduces his way to the necks of his gorgeous guests, transforming them into bloodthirsty slaves while, shy virginal Karen (Haydée Politoff, Queens of Evil) becomes the apple of his eye and essential to his much grander plan.  Boasting gothic ambiance, full moons and eroticism, Javier Aguirre (Hunchback of the Morgue) directs with elegance in this atmospheric tale that presents a memorable interpretation of Dracula who is quick to whip and axe his victims as commonly as sink his fangs into them.  Weaving a narrative of originality and rich complexity, Count Dracula’s Great Love remains effective for Naschy’s understated performance and the film’s blood ritual used to resurrect Dracula’s deceased daughter, concluding in lovesick tragedy.

    Beautifully scanned and restored in 2K from the 35mm internegative, Vinegar Syndrome presents Count Dracula’s Great Love with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  While minor intrusions from scratches and cigarette burns are evident, the Spanish feature has never looked better.  Bringing vibrant life to skin tones and the colorful costume choices of its actresses, detail is crisp preserving the fog-entranced tone while, black levels seen in Count Dracula’s cape, casket and dark dwellings are exceptionally inky.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, the film’s English dub track may register t’s and s sounds too sharply but, overwhelmingly exudes clean and audible dialogue levels while, cracks and pop are minimal and of little to no notice.  Presenting both its uncut U.S. edition and its original Spanish language version, viewers are informed that the latter, lacking proper elements from its licensor (and missing shots due to content that are only found in its English counterpart), is presented from lesser quality video sources and a Dolby Digital 2.0 mix in order to appreciatively appease fans yearning for both cuts.  Meanwhile, special features include, a never before released Audio Commentary with Director Javier Aguirre & Actor Paul Naschy featuring optional subtitles in both English and Spanish plus, a newly captured Video Interview with Actress Mirta Miller (8:22) with optional English subtitles.  Furthermore, the U.S. Theatrical Trailer (3:04), a Still Gallery (2:16) and a 6-page booklet featuring an informative essay from Mirek Lipinski are also included alongside a DVD edition of the release and Reversible Cover Art.  Fans of horror’s more gothic and erotic outings will take pleasure sinking their fangs into this significant Spanish offering, splendidly brought to high-definition by Vinegar Syndrome for the first time ever!

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Vinegar Syndrome, Count Dracula’s Great Love can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

    Child’s Play (1988)

    Director: Tom Holland

    Starring: Catherine Hicks, Chris Sarandon, Alex Vincent & Brad Dourif

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Instilling a new titan for modern horror and ushering in a frightening franchise of sequels each varying in quality, the original Child’s Play still reigns as the most effective and chilling of Chucky’s many chapters.  When innocent six-year-old Andy Barclay (Alex Vincent, Wait Until Spring, Bandini) is presented with a Good Guy doll on his birthday, strange occurrences and the death of his babysitter raise questions of responsibility in their wake.  Unsuccessfully convincing his single mother and a homicide detective that his doll is alive and behind the recent string of murders, Andy finds himself pursued by the tiny terror in order to take over his soul.  Before the bodycount pictures its later entries would become with the foul-mouthed killer serving as their marketing mascot, Child’s Play’s less is more approach keeps viewers questioning the validity of Andy’s claims more so than blindly assuming his doll is truly possessed.  Wrapped in mystery and edge of your seat suspense with an oftentimes forgotten voodoo subplot, Child’s Play holds up strongly with a believable blend of special effects wizardry, an urban Chicago setting and top-notch performances with Dourif’s shrieking voice as the crazed Chucky leaving an indelible mark on the nightmares of viewers for years to come.

    Newly scanned in 2K from the interpositive, Scream Factory presents Child’s Play with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Casting a darker yet, more natural appearance during nighttime sequences, skin tones are accurate and nicely detailed while, colors found in Chucky’s red-striped and denim attire along with the neon-lit signage of the toy store in the film’s opening pop well.  Scuffs and other blemishes appear to be absent while, softness during daytime exteriors and inside the Barclay’s apartment look similar to its previous release.  Admittedly modest in its improvements, Scream Factory’s latest stab at Child’s Play unquestionably ranks as its best looking.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix that projects solid dialogue and booming displays of authority during thunderstorms and Joe Renzetti’s (Poltergeist III) creepy score, sound quality is superior.  In addition, an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix has also been included.  Impressively packed with new and old offerings, Disc 1 features a new Audio Commentary with Director Tom Holland plus, a repurposed Audio Commentary with Actors Alex Vincent, Catherine Hicks & “Chucky” Designer Kevin Yagher.  Furthermore, another vintage Audio Commentary with Producer David Kirschner & Screenwriter Don Mancini along with hilarious Chucky Commentaries on select scenes are also included.

    Kicking off Disc 2, Behind-the-Scenes Special Effects Footage (1:00:08), Howard Berger: Your Special Effects Friend ‘Till the End (40:53) and Life Behind the Mask: Being Chucky with Ed Gale (40:02) comprise the release’s newest and highly fascinating featurettes while, Evil Comes in Small Packages (24:49), Chucky: Building a Nightmare (10:05), A Monster Convention (5:26), Introducing Chucky: The Making of Child’s Play (6:15) and a Vintage Featurette (4:54) from MGM’s previous release are ported over.  In addition, a TV Spot (0:17), Theatrical Trailer (2:02), a Behind-the-Scenes Photo Gallery (37 in total), a Posters & Lobby Cards Photo Gallery (20 in total) and Reversible Cover Art featuring the original 1-sheet poster conclude the all encompassing slate of extras.  A frightening sophomore followup from Director Tom Holland (Fright Night), Child’s Play maintains its reputation as one of the better supernatural slashers of the 80s while, Scream Factory’s Collector’s Edition, sprawling with bounds of extras, is nothing short of a gift from the mighty Damballa himself.

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available now from Scream Factory, Child’s Play can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

    Burial Ground (1980)

    Director: Andrea Bianchi

    Starring: Mariangela Giordano, Karin Well, Gianluigi Chirizzi, Peter Bark & Roberto Caporali

    Released by: Severin Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Presented under its alternate The Nights of Terror title, Burial Ground hosts a smorgasbord of guts and bloody depravity when a country getaway for several couples quickly turns into a fight for their lives against reanimated corpses.  Preoccupied with their own sexual appetite when a scientist’s tinkering with evil forces unleashes hell’s hungriest zombies, the couples struggle to defend themselves while keeping the rotting forces from gaining entry into the mansion.  A wall-to-wall bonkers example of Italian exploitation at its finest, Burial Ground’s plot may be paper thin but, graciously overcompensates with gallons of gore and some of the genre’s most memorable zombie designs befit with gaping facial holes, horrific skeletal features and squirming maggots oozing from their pores.  Weaponizing themselves with pickaxes, scythes and other garden tools, the ravenous undead decapitate the help and repeatedly feast on the torn out organs of their prey.  Perhaps even more memorable than the zombie’s persistent attacks, Burial Ground’s bizarro meter soars when Michael (Peter Bark, Arrivano i gatti), the peculiar-looking son of Karen, grows oddly attracted to his mother and makes an incestuous pass at her in the heat of zombiepalooza.  With options running low and escape unlikely, nothing can prepare viewers for Burial Ground’s absurd mouthful of a finale that draws its line in the sand as one of the great “what the…” moments of splatter cinema.

    Gorgeously restored in 2K from pristine elements, Severin Films presents Burial Ground with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.66:1 aspect ratio.  True to its description, this newly struck scan is leaps and bounds superior to past releases with a blemish-free appearance, strong facial tones and impressive detail bringing out the intricacies of the many zombie makeup designs and their intendedly heinous features.  Furthermore, the film’s plethora of blood pops loudly while, black levels, even during the film’s more dimly lit sequences, are effectively inky, allowing viewers to fully appreciate all that is occurring.  Definitive as can be, Severin Films deserves the utmost praise for their esteemed handling of this Italian gorefest.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is perfectly audible throughout without any static or pops detected.  In addition, a separate Dolby Digital 2.0 Italian mix is included with optional English subtitles.  Bonus offerings include, Villa Parisi - Legacy of Terror (15:47) where Movie Historian Fabio Melelli revisits the filming locations that date back to the 17th century and have been utilized by Italian film productions beginning in the 1960s through the present.  Meanwhile, Peter Still Lives: Festival Q&A with Actor Peter Bark (7:35), Just for the Money: Interview with Actor Simone Mattioli (8:57) and The Smell of Death: Interviews with Producer Gabriele Crisanti & Actress Mariangela Giordano (9:20) are joined by Deleted/Extended Scenes/Shots (10:24), the Theatrical Trailer (3:31) and Reversible Cover Art.  Lastly, limited to the first 3,000 units, an exclusive slipcover featuring new artwork by Wes Benscoter is also included.  Riding high on a profoundly successful 2016, Severin Films continues to spoil exploitation enthusiasts with their treatment of Burial Ground, so definitive that the opening of hell’s gates can be the only justification for quality of this caliber.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Severin Films, Burial Ground can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

    Waxwork (1988) / Waxwork II: Lost in Time (1991)

    Director: Anthony Hickox

    Starring: Zach Galligan, Deborah Foreman, Michelle Johnson, Dana Ashbrook, Michah Grant, Eric Brown, Clare Carey, Patrick Macnee & David Warner / Zach Galligan, Monkia Schnarre, Alexander Godunov, Martin Kemp & Bruce Campbell 

    Released by: Lionsgate

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Melding the humorously wacky with the horrific, Waxwork finds a group of collegiate friends who stumble upon a mysterious wax museum displaying the most vile monsters, madmen and psychos albeit without victims.  Before long, their innocent tour lures them into its dark magic to become permanent members of the establishments morbid offerings.  Starring Zach Galligan (Gremlins) and Deborah Foreman (Valley Girl) with appearances from distinguished Englishmen and talented thespians Patrick Macnee (The Avengers) and David Warner (Tron) as the villainous museum owner, Waxwork’s greatest strength lies in its animated displays that honor the classic monsters of yesteryear and submerging would-be victims into their appropriately themed worlds.  Transforming into mini films within a film, the high maintenance China (Michelle Johnson, Death Becomes Her) finds herself immersed within Count Dracula’s gothic castle and forced to duel against his bloodthirsty brides while, the chain-smoking Tony (Dana Ashbrook, Twin Peaks) stumbles into the full moon lit backwoods where the beastly Wolfman (John-Rhys Davies, Raiders of the Lost Ark) hunts.  While the rather busy narrative throws touches of black magic, evil trinkets, freakish butlers and interdimensional realms to the forefront that occasionally scatterbrains the proceedings, Waxwork’s free-for-all conclusion pitting the likes of Marquis de Sade and zombies against the privileged Mark (Galligan) and his wheelchair-bound godfather right the ship in this clever sendup of classic chills under the guise of 80s video age eye-candy.

    Surviving the fiery events of the original film, Mark and Sarah (replaced by Monkia Schnarre, The Peacekeeper) return in Waxwork II: Lost in Time when a resilient zombie hand from the wax museum murders Sarah’s stepfather, pinning the blame on her.  Determined to prove her innocence, the two recover a magical compass enabling them to time travel through dimensions in order to gather the proper evidence to clear Sarah’s name.  Far more fantasy based than its predecessor with the characters winding up in medieval times to combat a black magic wielding sorcerer, Waxwork II: Lost in Time, using Lewis Carrol’s Through the Looking-Glass as a loose template, makes greater use of hilariously parodying genre films than properly traveling through historical events.  Making stops at Victor Frankenstein’s laboratory and the streets of London during Jack the Ripper’s reign of terror, Alien, The Haunting and Godzilla among other films all find their way cheekily homaged in this more refined sequel.  Graced with brief roles from B-movie legends Bruce Campbell (Evil Dead) and David Carradine (Death Race 2000), Waxwork II: Lost in Time widens its universe even more so, delivering a followup with more comedic oomph that surprisingly exceeds its originator by a narrow margin.

    Digitally restored, Lionsgate, under their Vestron Video Collector’s Series imprint, presents both Waxwork and Waxwork II: Lost in Time with 1080p transfers, sporting 1.85:1 aspect ratios.  Bearing generally clean appearances with scant scratches and slight speckling during darker sequences, colors pop effectively with skin tones reading nicely although, softness is not wholly uncommon or overly unpleasant.  Furthermore, its sequel noticeably improves during its extended black and white sequences mocking The Haunting that shine more sharply than the first film.  Respectable upgrades on both features will leave the overwhelming majority of fans more than pleased with the results.  Equipped with DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mixes, dialogue is admirably conveyed while occasional moments during the first film find character lines at odds with other dominating sound factors.  Otherwise making solid use of their respective musical scores, both tracks strongly live up to expectations.  

    Providing each film on their own Blu-ray disc, special features on Waxwork’s Disc 1 include, an Audio Commentary with Director Anthony Hickox & Actor Zach Galligan and an Isolated Score & Audio Interview with Composer Roger Bellon.  Additionally, The Waxwork Chronicles (1:22:17), another first-rate Red Shirt Pictures production divided into six parts, explores the development and making of both films with newly captured interviews from Writer/Director Anthony Hickox, Editor Christopher Cibelli, Producer Staffon Ahrenberg, Special Make-Up Effects Supervisor Bob Keen, Actors Zach Galligan, Monika Schnarre and many others covering everything Waxwork related fans would ever want to know.  Also included, a vintage The Making of Waxwork (24:06) featurette, the Theatrical Trailer (2:02) and a Still Gallery (7:55) conclude the disc’s helpings.  Next up, Waxwork II: Lost in Time’s Disc 2 opens with another Audio Commentary with Director Anthony Hickox & Actor Zach Galligan, an Isolated Score & Audio Interview with Composer Steve Schiff, a Music Video (3:50), Theatrical Trailer (3:03), Still Gallery (7:17) and a Reversible Cover Art capping off the double feature’s supplemental package.  Nostalgia will surely ring loudly for viewers raised on both Waxwork features during the heyday of video rental.  A clever and unique injection of horror and comedy during the slasher prominent decade, both films, with its 1991 sequel having a slight advantage, are enjoyable excursions into silliness that have been passionately peppered with ample bonus features to continue making the legacy of Vestron Pictures proud.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available now from Lionsgate, Waxwork / Waxwork II: Lost in Time can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

    Lady in White (1988)

    Director: Frank LaLoggia

    Starring: Lukas Haas, Len Cariou, Alex Rocco & Katherine Helmond

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Set in the wholesome suburb of Willowpoint Falls circa 1962, Lady in White centers on monster kid Frankie Scarlatti (Lukas Haas, Mars Attacks!) who narrowly escapes death at the hands of a mysterious child murderer.  Aided by the first victim’s ghost, Frankie vows to bring the elusive killer to justice who may be closer than he knows.  Capturing the virtually lost magic of small-town Americana and shot on location in the picturesque region of Upstate New York, Lady in White weaves its atmospheric tale of local legends, ghosts and cold-blooded murder with expert direction and grounded performances that shine with pure naturalism.  Following Frankie’s supernatural encounter, the neighborhood myth of the lady in white searching for her fallen child ties into the picture’s larger story with the very real threat of her assailant still at large injecting a genuine undercurrent of thrills.  Reminiscent of Stephen King’s best coming of age fables, Lady in White’s acute capturing of simpler times while, injecting deeply rooted themes of family, facing fears and discrimination come from a creative voice of passion and experience that Writer/Director Frank LaLoggia (Fear No Evil) conveys in earnest.  An underrated masterwork with an innate connection to the heart and mystery of childhood, Lady in White remains as riveting as ever, eclipsing its reputation as one of the finest ghost stories of its kind.

    Debuting on high-definition with 2 Discs featuring the Director’s Cut (1:57:49, Disc 1), Theatrical Version (1:53:34, Disc 2) and the preferred Extended Director’s Cut (2:06:52, Disc 2), Scream Factory presents Lady in White with 1080p transfers, sporting 1.85:1 aspect ratios.  Utilizing the film’s interpositive and an archived film print to assemble the never-before-released lengthier director’s cut, the inherently soft photography is perfectly maintained while, fall leaves and seasonally appropriate greenery are lively looking.  Seamlessly blending its two elements for a first-rate restoration, the director’s intended cut looks excellent whereas the film’s alternate versions are of equal merit.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix that forewarns hiss and pops that are hardly noticeable on its extended version, dialogue is never inaudible with the subtle ambiance of howling winds and crashing waves complimenting the proceedings nicely while, the film’s beautiful music selections, handled also by its Writer/Director, perform most effectively.  In addition an optional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix has also been included.  However unfortunate that no new supplements were produced for the release, vintage bonus features found entirely on Disc 1 include, an Introduction with Frank LaLoggia (0:46), an Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Frank LaLoggia (Director’s Cut only), Behind-the-Scenes Footage with Introduction by Frank LaLoggia (16:21) and optional commentary from its creator.  Furthermore, Deleted Scenes with Introduction by Frank LaLoggia (36:13) and optional commentary, a Promotional Short Film (7:18), the Theatrical Trailer (1:57), Alternate Trailers (7:10), TV Spots (1:34), Radio Spots (2:21), a Behind-the-Scenes Photo Montage (28 in total) and an Extended Photo Gallery (21 in total) wrap up the on-disc extras while, a Reversible Cover Art is also included.  An evocative coming of age chiller ripe for rediscovery and annual viewing, Lady in White is a prime ghostly offering for the Halloween season that stands out for its relatable themes and haunting narrative worthy of the deepest respect.  

    RATING: 4.5/5

    Available now from Scream Factory, Lady in White can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.


  • The Earth Dies Screaming (1964) Blu-ray Review

    The Earth Dies Screaming (1964)

    Director: Terrence Fisher

    Starring: Willard Parker, Virginia Field, Dennis Price, Thorley Walters, Vanda Godsell, David Spenser & Anna Palk

    Released by: Kino Lorber Studio Classics

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Following a worldwide extraterrestrial assault, The Earth Dies Screaming follows several survivors whose defenses and ingenuity depends on the future of the human race.  Willard Parker (Kiss Me Kate) headlines this British science fiction opus, scripted by Harry Spalding (Curse of the Fly, The Watcher in the Woods) under the pseudonym Henry Cross.

    Surrounded by a siege of collapsed bodies and witness to vehicular disasters, The Earth Dies Screaming finds civilization ravaged by robotic saucer men, leaving only a handful of survivors to counteract the invasion.  Breezy and immensely entertaining, Director Terrence Fisher (Horror of Dracula, The Mummy), commonly known for his gothic masterpieces for Hammer Films, brings ample tension and desolate dread to one of his only proper sci-fi centered features.  As the metallic monsters repurpose fallen humans as eerie, white-eyed hunters, The Earth Dies Screaming, led by an American surrounded by local Englishmen, unquestionably bears its influence on George A. Romero’s zombie classic Night of the Living Dead while, remaining a terrifically undervalued end of days feature in its own right.  Shot at Shepparton Studios in London, suspicion amongst the surviving humans and an expectant mother contribute added doses of suspense to this space age thriller that concludes on an explosive note.

    Kino Lorber Studio Classics presents The Earth Dies Screaming with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.66:1 aspect ratio.  Bearing no detrimental marks of age-related scuffs, the film’s monochrome photography is beautifully relayed with sharp detail and black levels leaving deeply inky impressions.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is well handled and absent of hiss or pops while, the remainder of the rather tame track makes admirable strides through its score and collisions into the alien robots.  Special features include, an Audio Commentary with Film Historian Richard Harland Smith, an Animated Photo Montage (3:37) and Trailers for The Earth Dies Screaming (2:14), Invisible Invaders (2:00), Chosen Survivors (3:06), Panic in the Year Zero (2:24) and The Satan Bug (2:12) rounding out the supplements.

    Trading Dracula’s fangs for terror from above, The Earth Dies Screaming maintains Terrence Fisher’s exacting touch with thrills and atmospheric suspense.  Wildly underrated while influencing later day genre efforts, the menacingly titled British feature stands out against its rampant American made counterparts of the era.  Meanwhile, Kino Lorber Studio Classics welcomes the sci-fi favorite to high-definition with impressive technical grades that genre fans will be happy to have invade their collections.

    RATING: 4/5

    Available now from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, The Earth Dies Screaming can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • The Return of the Living Dead (1985) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    The Return of the Living Dead (1985)

    Director: Dan O’Bannon

    Starring: Clu Gulager, James Karen, Don Calfa, Thom Mathews, Beverly Randolph, John Philbin, Jewel Shepard, Miguel Núñez, Brian Peck, Linnea Quigley & Mark Venturini

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    When an employee’s rookie mistake at a medical supply warehouse releases a toxic gas, The Return of the Living Dead finds corpses reanimating from a nearby cemetery with an undying hunger for human brains.  While a hard-partying pack of punks rage the night away, the ravenously deceased intend to make the tough-looking teens their main course.  Featuring a diverse cast from Clu Gulager (The Last Picture Show) and James Karen (Wall Street) to Thom Mathews (Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives) and scream queen Linnea Quigley (Night of the Demons), this beloved horror-comedy proudly declares it’s party time!

    Cheekily proclaiming itself to be based on true events, The Return of the Living Dead is a brain-chomping romp that seamlessly blends the frightening takeover of zombies with the comedic knee-jerk reactions of those caught within its grasp.  Shortly after warehouse foreman Frank (Karen) introduces new employee Freddy (Mathews) to a decrepit military tank containing a reanimated corpse, faulty craftsmanship unloads a toxic gas into the air jumpstarting their Fourth of July weekend for the worse.  Uncontrollably hacking from the fumes and panicking over the disappearance of the bottled body, the two nervous nellies call warehouse superior Burt (Gulager) after a previously frozen cadaver grows energetically impatient in the meat locker.  While the trio attempt to hack and slash their problems to pieces, Freddy’s girlfriend Tina and his gang of leather-clad punker pals kill time in the graffiti-laden cemetery near the medical supply warehouse.  After several failed attempts to return the cadaver to its quieter state, the blue-collar workers swing by the local mortuary hoping to coax undertaker Ernie (Calfa) to incinerate the chopped up limbs, unknowingly unleashing the fumes into the rainy exterior to bring life to the cemeteries longterm residents who return with an appetite for brains.  Surrounded by hundreds of flesh-eating zombies, the middle-aged adults and punks find themselves combining their efforts to keep the undead far from their noggins.   

    From a story co-conceived by John Russo (Night of the Living Dead), Dan O’Bannon’s directorial debut aptly separates itself from George A. Romero’s groundbreaking, if not grimmer, series of zombie features with a refreshing take that keeps its tongue steadfast to its cheek.  Featuring two universally different groups of characters that work hard for the money while, partying and zero responsibility define the younger rebels, The Return of the Living Dead, exemplified by its teased hairstyles and punktastic soundtrack featuring such acts as 45 Grave, The Cramps and The Flesh Eaters affirms itself as the definitive zombie feature for the 80s.  Showered with knee-slapping one liners, topnotch makeup effects and a career making striptease atop a tombstone from the vivacious Linnea Quigley who remains in her birthday suit for the duration of the film, The Return of the Living Dead has endured and entertainingly corrupted more brains than imagined proving this genre-blending cocktail is more than a statement, it’s a bloody fun lifestyle!

    Boasting a new 2K scan from the inter-positive, Scream Factory presents The Return of the Living Dead with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Supporting a noticeable boost in contrast with skin tones appearing more natural than ever before, colors found in the punks’ loud ensembles and the gooey zombie designs are of particular mention, easily trumping previous releases more subdued appearances.  Meanwhile, black levels are strongly handled crowning Scream Factory’s presentation as the definitive go-to transfer for the cult feature.  Equipped with the film’s Original DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Mono mix, fans will be pleased to hear the zombies original dialogue on the track while, The Damned’s “Dead Beat Dance” remains MIA but not for the lack of trying on Scream Factory’s behalf.  Joined by a sizably impressive DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix that relays dialogue with ease and ups the ante on the film’s punk soundtrack, an additional DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Stereo mix has also been included for your listening pleasure.  Easily Scream Factory’s most packed Collector’s Edition release to date, the multitude of bonus content spans two discs with Disc 1 featuring a new Audio Commentary with Author Gary Smart and Chris Griffiths, along with a second newly-produced Audio Commentary with Actors Thom Mathews, John Philbin & Make-Up Effects Artist Tony Gardner.  Furthermore, two vintage Audio Commentaries featuring Director Dan O’Bannon and Production Designer William Stout along with a Cast and Crew edition hosting Production Designer William Stout and Actors Don Calfa, Linnea Quigley, Brian Peck, Beverly Randolph & Allan Trautman are also included.  Ported over from the previous MGM release, The Decade of Darkness (23:23) is a thoroughly impressive featurette on ‘80s horror cinema with such talking heads as Joe Dante (The Howling), Stuart Gordon (Dolls), Elvira, John Landis (An American Werewolf in London) and others featured plus, Theatrical Trailers (8:31), TV Spots (5:22), a Still Gallery (86 in total) showcasing Posters, Lobby Cards, Movie Stills and other Behind-the-Scenes materials whereas a second Still Gallery (23 in total) displays photos from Special Make-Up Effects Artist Kenny Myers’ personal collection.  Finally, Zombie Subtitles for the film and In Their Own Words - The Zombies Speak where onscreen descriptions for what the brain eaters are thinking round out the disc’s supplements.

    Continuing the onslaught of special features, Disc 2 hosts the phenomenal More Brains: A Return to the Living Dead (1:59:43) documentary from 2011, The FX of the Living Dead (32:49) where Production Designer William Stout, Special Effects Make-Up Artists William Munns, Tony Gardner, Actor Brian Peck and others discuss the development and designs of the film’s undead characters while, Party Time!: The Music of Return of the Living Dead (29:31) catches up with Music Consultants Budd Carr, Steve Pross, Dinah Cancer of 45 Grave, Chris D of The Flesh Eaters, Greg Hetson of The Circle Jerks and many more on how the building of the soundtrack on a limited budget was achieved.  Next up, Horror’s Hallowed Grounds (10:15) finds host Sean Clark as he revisits many of the film’s shooting locations today, A Conversation with Dan O’Bannon: The Final Interview (28:32) is a candid and at times tearjerking sit-down with the film’s writer/director as he discusses the many challenges and rewards that came with making the film while, The Origins of Return of the Living Dead (15:12) interviews John A. Russo.  In addition, The Dead Have Risen (20:34) interviews the cast of the film in this vintage yet, highly entertaining featurette, Designing the Dead (13:39) hosts Writer/Director Dan O’Bannon and Production Designer William Stout as they chart their early beginnings in the industry and their eventual collaboration.  Lastly, although appearing in rough shape and SD sourced, the Workprint Version of The Return of the Living Dead (1:48:05) offers fans an early, 20 extra minute cut of the film for preservations sake.  Advertised with Graham Humphreys exceptional new cover design, the Reversible Cover Art features the film’s original 1-sheet poster imagery as well.

    Darkly hilarious and carnivorously campy, The Return of the Living Dead remains one of the zombie genres greatest efforts with its party-like atmosphere and punk rock attitude loudly making itself known as the most fun you’ll have evading the undead.  A cult classic in the truest sense, Scream Factory has stepped up to the plate to salute the brain-eating feature with a glorious new 2K transfer, several audio options and their most impressive output of bonus features yet amounting to over 12 whopping hours of content.  As definitive as can be, more brains won’t be necessary as Scream Factory’s Collector’s Edition of The Return of the Living Dead will surely quench the appetites for both the living and the reanimated.  It’s party time!!!

    RATING: 5/5

    Available July 19th from Scream Factory, The Return of the Living Dead can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • My Boyfriend's Back (1993) Blu-ray Review

    My Boyfriend’s Back (1993)

    Director: Bob Balaban

    Starring: Andrew Lowery, Traci Lind, Matthew Fox, Edward Herrmann & Mary Beth Hurt

    Released by: Mill Creek Entertainment

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From Producer Sean S. Cunningham (Friday the 13th), My Boyfriend’s Back centers on high school senior Johnny Dingle (Andrew Lowery, School Ties) as he builds up the courage to ask class hottie Missy McCloud (Traci Lind, Fright Night Part 2) to the prom.  Unfortunately, a fatal setback claims Johnny’s life resulting in his comical return from the grave to his keep his dream date on schedule.  Helmed by noted actor and director Bob Balaban (Parents), this offbeat horror/comedy is an entertainingly cheesy romp that adheres to the basic tropes of teen films while, its cast juggles its silly plot of prom queens and zombie infatuation with big, goofy smiles.  Incapable of taking itself seriously, My Boyfriend’s Back juxtaposes its narrative with comic-like panel transitions as Johnny’s undead existence in suburbia is met with equal parts acceptance by his loving parents (Edward Herrmann, The Lost Boys and Mary Beth Hurt, Young Adult) while, Missy’s ex-boyfriend Buck (Matthew Fox in his film debut) is less than enthusiastic.  Decaying by the day as limbs fall off his body and his hunger for human flesh grows, Johnny and Missy’s romance is tested when gun-toting townspeople want their local zombie buried for good.  Combatting a greedy doctor that seeks Johnny for his own experimentations and swaying the approval of Missy’s sheriff father (Jay O. Sanders, JFK), the living and the undead make the most of their magical evening in their fog-entrenched school gymnasium.  Released in 1993 yet, containing the colorful gaudiness of 80s productions, My Boyfriend’s Back notably introduces the late Philip Seymour Hoffman (Capote) in an early role as one of Johnny’s unfortunate meals and Matthew McConaughey (True Detective) in a blink-and-you-miss him appearance.  While the genre-blending black comedy may have arrived a few years behind the curve, My Boyfriend’s Back remains an unsophisticatedly screwy good time ripe for digging up.

    Mill Creek Entertainment presents My Boyfriend’s Back with a 1080p transfer, sporting a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.  With mild speckling on display, skin tones are surprisingly well-handled with only occasional hints of oversaturation.  Otherwise nicely detailed and relaying rather strong doses of color in blood spread across Johnny’s mouth, interiors of the high school’s locker-filled halls and the EC Comic-like transitions, My Boyfriend’s Back may have occasional hiccups but, remains a generally satisfying watch.  Equipped with a Dolby Digital 2.0 mix, dialogue is decently, if not unimpressively, relayed while, the film’s musical selections and intendedly dynamic sound effects are largely flat and disappointing.  No special features have been included on this release.

    Fun and welcomingly out there, My Boyfriend’s Back takes a zombified teenager’s desire for his crush to hilarious heights where undead prejudice and a hunger for limbs are their biggest threats.  Littered with a surprisingly well known cast in early roles, Mill Creek Entertainment ushers this Disney owned skeleton from their Touchstone Pictures banner with a well-handled, filmic transfer while, its audio mix leaves much to be desired.  Admittedly looking better than ever, My Boyfriend’s Back returns from the grave (again) in a manner that should leave fans quite pleased.

    RATING: 3/5

    Available now from Mill Creek Entertainment, My Boyfriend’s Back can be purchased via and other fine retailers.

  • The Serpent and the Rainbow (1988) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    The Serpent and the Rainbow (1988)

    Director: Wes Craven

    Starring: Bill Pullman, Cathy Tyson, Zakes Moake, Paul Winfield, Brent Jennings, Michael Gough & Dey Young

    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    From the director A Nightmare on Elm Street, The Serpent and the Rainbow centers on anthropologist Dennis Alan (Bill Pullman, Spaceballs) as he journeys to Haiti to retrieve a mystic powder said to bring life to the dead.  Navigating the dangerous locale, Dennis finds himself involved in the deadly world of voodoo where the undead, possessions and ancient curses reign.  Cathy Tyson (Mona Lisa), Zakes Moake (Waterworld), Paul Winfield (The Terminator), Brent Jennings (Witness), Michael Gough (Batman) and Dey Young (Strange Behavior) co-star.

    Inspired by real life experiences documented in Wade Davis’ book, The Serpent and the Rainbow is a daring exploration of voodoo and the black arts.  Shot partly in the reportedly unsafe Haiti, Director Wes Craven’s nightmare-fueled opus is a noticeable departure from his previous shockers with an emphasis on the island’s factual political turmoil.  After barely surviving an Amazonia search for rare herbs and experiencing a psychedelic episode, anthropologist Dennis Alan (Pullman) is summoned by a domestic drug corporation to investigate a mysterious powder used during voodoo practices in Haiti that supposedly raises the dead.  Aided by doctor Marielle Duchamp (Tyson), Dennis’ encounter with a local zombie who roams cemeteries fuels his desire to locate the substance only to find himself ruffling the feathers of the barbaric authorities, led by Captain Dargent Peytraud (Moake).  Warned but not harmed, Dennis’ search leads him to swindling witch doctor Mozart (Jennings) who makes a deal to show the American how to develop the drug.  Pursued once again by the authorities, Dennis finds himself in dire straits when he is ruthlessly tortured and has his scrotum nailed to a chair, demanding his immediate departure from Haiti.  Riddled with frightening nightmares of rotting corpses and sinister snakes, Dennis’ short-lived return to America where friends are possessed and his concern for Marielle increased, leads him back to the black magic plagued isle.  Upon arrival, Peytraud’s power and influence knows no bounds as people are slaughtered with the resilient doctor learning firsthand the grave danger he is in.

    Although hesitantly considered a horror film, Craven’s cult classic supplies plenty of unsettling nightmare imagery where a serpent emerges from a decomposing body to attack Dennis while, dark forces cause a scorpion to crawl from the mouth of a living man.  In addition, the savage brutality of the Tonton Macoute beheading innocent lives is equally grizzly and not far removed from reality.  Akin to a fever dream of terror that never wanes, The Serpent and the Rainbow is one of Craven’s most progressively daring features that affects viewers on a purely visceral level of fear.  Earning respectable returns at the box-office, The Serpent and the Rainbow is the rare voodoo related feature that lives up to its intent as a supernatural spectacle.

    Scream Factory presents The Serpent and the Rainbow with a newly struck 1080p transfer from the inter-positive film element, sporting a 1.85:1 aspect ratio.  Although appearing occasionally soft in the dilapidated dwellings of the Haitian villages, greenery is noticeably lush and striking throughout.  Skin tones read moderately well and natural with several instances falling on the redder side.  Meanwhile, detail is strong with perspiration glistening on faces and the intricacies of rotting flesh found on the undead looking quiet noticeable.  Psychedelic colors and blood pop nicely while, black levels are inky and clear.  Filmic and hosting very scant scratches, The Serpent and the Rainbow makes a respectable high-definition debut.  Equipped with a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix, dialogue is audible and effective while, the bustling sounds of the Haitian streets are lively and appropriately balanced.  Meanwhile, Brad Fiedel’s (Fright Night, Terminator 2: Judgement Day) score makes impressive statements against the shrieking screams of terror.  Welcomed into Scream Factory’s Collector’s Edition series, special features include, an Audio Commentary with Actor Bill Pullman, moderated by Rob Galluzzo.  Although Pullman is only present for less than an hour due to filming commitments, Galluzzo does a remarkable job keeping the conversation interesting with Pullman injecting plenty of anecdotes about the filming experience.  In addition, The Making of The Serpent and the Rainbow (23:57) features new (audio) interviews from Pullman while, Author Wade Davis, Director of Photography John Lindley and Special Makeup Effects Artists Lance Anderson and David Anderson appear on-camera.  Yet another typically informative retrospective that fans will appreciate although, the scholarly insight from the late Craven is sadly lacking.  Furthermore, the Theatrical Trailer (1:23), TV Spot (0:31), a Photo Gallery (60 in total) and a Reversible Cover Art featuring the original 1-sheet artwork conclude the supplemental package.

    In what appears to be their last Craven related release and classily dedicated to his memory, Scream Factory welcomes The Serpent and the Rainbow’s unsettling levels of voodoo terror and nightmarish imagery into their respected line of Collector’s Editions.  Casting a superior looking curse with its Blu-ray debut, special features, although understandably lighter than past Craven efforts, deliver worthwhile information that fans of this cult classic will surely appreciate.  Hosting another stellar art design by Joel Robinson (Nightbreed, The Vincent Price Collections), The Serpent and the Rainbow will possess you with its frightening twists and turns.

    RATING: 3.5/5

    Available now from Scream Factory, The Serpent and the Rainbow can be purchased via, and other fine retailers.

  • Blu-ray/DVD Weekly Wrap-Up #7: Monsters, Odd Thomas, The Slumber Party Massacre, Buck Wild & MORE!

    This week's installment of the Blu-ray/DVD Weekly Wrap-Up #7 includes:

    - Monsters: The Complete Series (0:43)
    Street Date: February 25, 2014
    eOne Entertainment:

    - The Slumber Party Massacre (1982) (7:03)
    Street Date: March 18, 2014
    Scream Factory:

    - Return to Nuke'Em High Volume 1 (2013) (12:23)
    Street Date: March 18, 2014
    Anchor Bay Entertainment:

    - Odd Thomas (2013) (18:12)
    Street Date: March 25, 2014
    Image Entertainment:

    - Tom Holland's Twisted Tales (2013) (24:34)
    Street Date: March 18, 2014
    Image Entertainment:

    - Buck Wild (2013) (30:30)
    Street Date: March 18, 2014
    Millennium Entertainment:

    - The Flesh and Blood Show (1972) (35:09)
    Street Date: March 18, 2014
    Kino Lorber:

    - Frightmare (1974) (41:08)
    Street Date: March 18, 2014
    Kino Lorber:

    - Farewells/Sneak Peeks (48:23)

  • Reel Zombies (2008) Special Edition DVD Review

    Reel Zombies (2008)
    Director(s): Mike Masters & David J. Francis
    Starring: Mike Masters, David J. Francis, Stephen Papadimitriou, Sam Hall & Paul Fler
    Released by: Synapse Films

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    Since the golden days of Romero to the recent runaway success of The Walking Dead, zombies have held a grasp on audiences for decades.  With inflated budgets and A-list talent attaching themselves to projects of the living dead, originality is running stale in the genre.  Queue a Canadian team of indie filmmakers with a shoestring budget and playing themselves onscreen to inject some fresh blood.  Synapse Films proudly presents a satirical mockumentary about a ragtag group of friends attempting to stage their latest zombie flick amongst a very real zombie apocalypse.  Grab your weapons and most importantly, your filming equipment as we capture a peek of Reel Zombies...

    Reel Zombies stars Mike Masters and David J. Francis, appearing as themselves, as they eagerly attempt to complete the third film in their Zombie Night trilogy.  Set in the real world of a post zombie apocalypse, Masters and Francis gather up as many of their friends and real zombies to pull off this exciting venture.  With a dirt cheap budget and production woes every step of the way, a documentary crew follows their progress as the danger of actual flesh eating zombies slowly becomes their smallest worry.

    While, the zombie genre has grown tired with its overwhelming amount of awareness amongst the masses, a few promising efforts have impressed, most notably World War Z, Shaun of the Dead and Cockneys VS. Zombies.  With so many similar projects competing for audiences‘ attention, it becomes difficult to gauge the entertainment and originality factor for said projects.  The zombie genre has transformed little since George A. Romero’s 1968 classic Night of the Living Dead debuted, but any attempt to try something unique always attracts attention.  Reel Zombies, completed in 2008, attempts to spin a Christopher Guest-esque mockumentary against a zombie breakout with mostly successful results.  Directors Mike Masters and David J. Francis appear as themselves, along with the rest of their indie filmmaking cronies, when sheer boredom inspires them to shoot a new fictional zombie flick in their infested Canadian homestead.  The charm of Reel Zombies comes from the naturalistic quality of the cast that invites their actual offscreen friendships and humor to shine.  Contrary to popular belief, when asked to “act natural”, most people do the opposite and are not self aware enough to let their true personalities show.  The cast of Reel Zombies have no issue showcasing who they are, opening the floodgates for hilarious banter at every turn.  The documentary that is simultaneously being shot on the making of the film, which is constantly labeled as a mere EPK (Electronic Press Kit, for those unaware) by the cast, captures the good and bad but mostly, the bad.  The fly on the wall footage echos moments of The Office where dimwitted conversation is caught while trying to stage sequences.  Wrangling the real zombies becomes difficult as cast members turn up dead, forcing the makers of the film to take on a “pain is temporary, film is forever” stance and press on.  Reel Zombies not only works as an indie effort in zombie films but, as an effective showcase of the struggles of low-budget filmmaking.  The viewer walks away well informed on many stages of the process without ever feeling like they witnessed a tutorial.

    Reel Zombies works decently as the satirical mockumentary it is but, struggles to shake its less than stellar low-budget feel.  Surely intended, but by the final act, the aesthetic just begins to lose its mojo when the real zombies slowly take over.  As the viewer, we’re supposed to acknowledge these “real” zombies as threats that are endangering our heros but, unfortunately they appear no different than the mock-zombies found in the fictional film.  While, the final act finds the entire cast, with the exception of the documentary crew, meeting an unfortunate end, Reel Zombies still walks away as a decent independent effort that dared to be original.  With a slightly bigger budget and the right cast, Reel Zombies could easily be remade with even better results, but this small Canadian production did a fine job with everything they didn’t have.
    RATING: 3.5/5

    Synapse Films presents Reel Zombies in an anamorphic widescreen (1.78:1) transfer.  Captured through the lens of the documentary crews‘ digital camera, the film matches its intended look with off the cuff interviews and shaky camera movements.  The video presentation isn’t flawless but still captures detail and colors quite nicely.
    RATING: 3.5/5

    Equipped with a Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo mix, Reel Zombies captures dialogue decently especially in on camera interviews but moments where several people are speaking at once, most notably during the script’s table read, the audio becomes overwhelmed and slightly muffled.  Overall, a decent mix that is relayed sufficiently.
    RATING: 3/5


    - Audio Commentary with Directors Mike Masters & David J. Francis and Producer Stephen Papadimitriou: The three friends discuss the genesis of the project as well as their past efforts.  Humor and laughter run rampant as well as informative anecdotes about the shoot.

    - Deleted Scenes and Outtakes: Over 40 minutes worth of material.

    - Original Trailer

    RATING: 3/5

    Reel Zombies is a decent and unique stab at the zombie genre through the eyes of a satirical mockumentary.  The core cast and makers of the film succeed in letting their offscreen personalities shine, creating some truly funny moments.  While, the low-budget angle is clearly intended, it simultaneously hurts the production when attempting to make the real zombies appear menacing.  Synapse Films did a great service acquiring this earnest indie flick which doubles as an informative crash course in no-budget filmmaking.  The video and audio presentation are suitable with a supplemental package of decent extras worth exploring.  Reel Zombies may not be perfect but, it’s desire to try something wildly unique from other zombie efforts deserves a look.
    RATING: 3/5

  • Night of the Comet (1984) Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review

    Night of the Comet (1984)
    Director: Thom Eberhardt
    Starring: Robert Beltran, Catherine Mary Stewart, Kelli Maroney & Mary Wornov
    Released by: Scream Factory

    Reviewed by Mike Kenny

    In the cinematic year of 1984, audiences were introduced to a team of ghostbusting gents from the Big Apple and a crane-kicking kid.  In addition, teenagers residing on every Elm Street found a new reason to be terrified of their nightmares while Indiana Jones returned to the screen for a journey into a doomed temple.  Amidst all that excitement, a low-budget picture made a splash that showcased teenagers practically inheriting the Earth after its demise.  Scream Factory, the horror off-shoot of Shout! Factory, invites fans to rediscover the cult classic from the producers of Valley Girl.  After nearly 30 years since its original release, let’s see if Scream Factory’s highly anticipated edition has the chops to earn a spot on your shelf or be left for the comet zombies...

    Night of the Comet centers on an exciting night where the first comet to grace the planet in 65 million years occurs.  Unfortunately, not everyone is quite as interested in the event.  Regina Belmont (Catherine Mary Stewart of The Last Starfighter) and younger sister Samantha (Kelli Maroney of Chopping Mall fame) are two Valley Girls who are far more involved in their fashion trends, video games and of course, boys!  Upon daybreak, the girls discover they’re the only people left in Los Angeles while the rest of the population is either a pile of ash or a zombie.  What are two Valley Girls left to do in a world to themselves?  Shop, of course!  It isn’t long before the sisters have to defend themselves against ravenous zombies and blood-seeking scientists.

    The strength of a film like Night of the Comet comes from its ability to be so many things in one adventure.  While, the concept of the world ending and being the only ones left is far from new, it’s characters and tone make this a unique ride that knows nothing but fun.  Catherine Mary Stewart and Kelli Maroney’s chemistry is the glue that makes this film as entertaining as it is and allows for terrific humor to emerge.  Stewart’s hardheaded, almost tomboy-like attitude mixed with Maroney’s adorable but quick-witted nature is a perfect combination that never grows tired.  While both characters certainly fit the bill as “Valley Girls”, Stewart manages to hold a job at a movie theater and is gnarly at video games while Maroney wears the title more appropriately as the ditzy cheerleader type.  When the sisters encounter another survivor (Mexican Actor Robert Beltran of Eating Raoul), Stewart injects some hilarious, albeit politically incorrect, insults toward Beltran (“This isn’t date-night in the barrio, Hec-tor”) which makes you nostalgic for times when people weren’t so serious.  Switching gears, the film manages to make way for some creative make-up work on the zombies courtesy of Make-Up Effects Creator David B. Miller (A Nightmare on Elm Street, Dreamscape).  Moments of zombie encounters are far and few between, but when they do occur, the jump scares are effective.  Some would consider surviving the end of the world as a tragedy itself, but never doubt the resilience of teenage girls.  Stewart and Maroney revel in the world they’ve inherited by going on an endless shopping spree as they jam to Cyndi Lauper’s “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun” (performed by Tami Holbrook here).  It’s a scene like this that perfectly embodies the fun factor this film has to offer before being disrupted by a gang of thugs.  These humans on the verge of becoming zombies, headed by leader Willy, have an action-packed shootout with the girls resulting in some choice one liners by the head goon (“I’m not crazy, I just don’t give a fuck!”).

    As if this film wasn’t already hitting all the right cult buttons, more genre actors join the party in supporting roles.  Mary Wornov (Rock ‘n Roll High School) and Geoffrey Lewis (The Devil’s Rejects) are members of a scientific research team who also survived the comet catastrophe.  They are hellbent on scooping up any survivors in order to extract their blood for use in a serum.  The girls now not only have the occasional zombie on the prowl but now human beings gunning for them.  The film’s finale takes place in the scientists‘ secret bunker where the girls are preparing for their imminent doom.  Luckily, you can count on more exciting shoot-outs and explosions before the girls and their faithful companion Hector reclaim the world that is rightfully theirs.  Night of the Comet hits all the right chords in telling a fun, exciting and action-filled roller-coaster adventure.  Sure, there’s the occasional slow spot as the girls are getting accustomed to an empty Los Angles but it doesn’t take long to build its speed back up.  Night of the Comet came out at a time and place that captured a spirit that would be virtually impossible to duplicate today.  30 years later, it’s no real surprise why this film bears the title “cult classic”, it’s a hilarious and scary tale delivered by a talented cast and a bitchin‘ soundtrack.  If there’s one comet-related flick you need to see in the next 65 million years, there’s no question it’s Night of the Comet.
    RATING: 4.5/5

    Night of the Comet is presented in a 1080p High-Definition Widescreen transfer (1.78:1).  There’s no denying that this is the best Night of the Comet has ever looked but I couldn’t help but feel there was an aura of softness to the transfer.  By no means deal-breaking, just a pinch softer than what I had expected.  Skin tones are nice and natural while detail looks peachy in close-ups.  Instances of dirt and debris are minimal at best, making this one clean looking transfer with that filmic grain we love so much firmly intact.  Colors pop as well as I had anticipated with highlights being the neon lights in the radio station as well as Stewart’s turquoise jacket and Maroney’s blue and pink cheerleader outfit.  Scream Factory did a wonderful job on this flick and I almost dare anyone to do better.
    RATING: 4/5

    Night of the Comet features a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix that fell just a bit short of my expectations.  Dialogue comes across clearly although scenes at the radio station become harder to hear as background music overpowers the dialogue.  Raising the volume level to nearly 60 helped, but it still would have been beneficial to adjust the mix at certain moments.  That said, the terrific 80s soundtrack comes blasting out of your speakers which adds to the enjoyment factor of so many scenes.  Action scenes are blaring as can be while again falling a wee bit below my standards.  I found myself reaching for the the volume button again to really get the full impact out of shootout scenes.  Overall, the film does sound clear with soundtrack moments being the highlight.  My only real complaint is the lack of a louder push at more intense moments.  In addition, a DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mix and English subtitles are included.
    RATING: 3.5/5


    In true Collector’s Edition form, Scream Factory goes the extra mile in the special features department (NOTE: An interview with Actress Mary Wornov is listed on the back cover of the packaging but was never shot.  A busy schedule prevented this and the packaging was already printed before changes could be made).  

    - Audio Commentary with Writer / Director Thom Eberhardt

    - Audio Commentary with Stars Kelli Maroney and Catherine Mary Stewart

    - Audio Commentary with Production Designer John Muto

    - Valley Girls at the End of the World: Stars Kelli Maroney and Catherine Mary Stewart contribute to a series of interviews that run roughly 15 minutes.  The actress’ discuss the audition process, the late night shoots, the excitement of filming in a mall to themselves and the lasting impact of the film.

    - The Last Man on Earth?: Actor Robert Beltran sits down for a 12-minute interview injecting interesting anecdotes about his role in the film.  Beltran turned the film down twice before he finally came around and agreed to take the role.  

    - Curse of the Comet: Special Make-Up Effects Creator David B. Miller discusses how his previous work on Michael Jackson’s Thriller landed him the job on Night of the Comet.

    - Behind the Scenes Galleries

    - Film Photo Gallery

    - Theatrical Trailer

    - Reversible cover

    - DVD copy

    RATING: 5/5

    Night of the Comet is like a fine wine, it just continues to grow better with age.  The film is a unique bundle of fun that keeps its tongue firmly planted in its cheek.  The core cast do a phenomenal job making us laugh and root for them as they take down zombie scum and buzzkill scientists.  Nearly a year after its announcement, Scream Factory made the wait for this Collector’s Edition well worth it!  A solid video presentation, serviceable audio mix and a plethora of incredible special features along with Nathan Thomas Milliner’s custom artwork make this a crucial addition in every cult enthusiasts‘ collection.  The burden of civilization rests on you owning this!  Bitchin’, isn’t it?
    RATING: 4.5/5